Cedar Hill

State Park - Texas

Cedar Hill State Park is located on FM 1382 and the eastern shore of Joe Pool Lake in Cedar Hill, Texas (USA), ten miles southwest of Dallas. Cedar Hill State Park has two available camping areas as well a boat ramp, a small picnic area, and a fishing jetty. The Penn Farm Agricultural History Center is located within the park boundaries. The farm has reconstructed and historic buildings from the mid-19th century through the mid-20th century. The DORBA Mountain Bike Trail was designed, built and is maintained by Dallas Off-Road Bike Association. This trail is 12 miles long and consists of three concentric paths—3 miles (Short), 8 miles (Middle) and 12 miles (Outer).

maps

Trails Map of Cedar Hill State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Cedar Hill - Trails Map

Trails Map of Cedar Hill State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Trails Map of the DORBA Unit at Hill State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Cedar Hill - DORBA Trails

Trails Map of the DORBA Unit at Hill State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

brochures

Campground Map of Cedar Hill State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Cedar Hill - Map

Campground Map of Cedar Hill State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Trail Map of Cedar Hill State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Cedar Hill - Trails

Trail Map of Cedar Hill State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Trail Map of the DORBA Unit at Cedar Hill State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Cedar Hill - DORBA Unit Trails

Trail Map of the DORBA Unit at Cedar Hill State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Interpretive Guide of Cedar Hill State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Cedar Hill - Interpretive Guide

Interpretive Guide of Cedar Hill State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Self-Guided Tour to Pen Farm at Cedar Hill State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Cedar Hill - Penn Farm

Self-Guided Tour to Pen Farm at Cedar Hill State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Activity Guide for Cedar Hill State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Cedar Hill - Activity Guide

Activity Guide for Cedar Hill State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Birds of the Oaks and Prairies and Osage Plains of Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Cedar Hill - Birds of the Oaks and Prairies and Osage Plains of Texas

Birds of the Oaks and Prairies and Osage Plains of Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Birds at Cedar Hill State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Cedar Hill - Birds

Birds at Cedar Hill State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Rack Card of Cedar Hill State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Cedar Hill - Rack Card

Rack Card of Cedar Hill State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Official Texas State Parks Guide. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Texas State - Official Texas State Parks Guide

Official Texas State Parks Guide. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Official Texas State Parks Guide (español). Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Texas State - Guía de Parques

Official Texas State Parks Guide (español). Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Cedar Hill SP https://tpwd.texas.gov/state-parks/choke-canyon https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cedar_Hill_State_Park Cedar Hill State Park is located on FM 1382 and the eastern shore of Joe Pool Lake in Cedar Hill, Texas (USA), ten miles southwest of Dallas. Cedar Hill State Park has two available camping areas as well a boat ramp, a small picnic area, and a fishing jetty. The Penn Farm Agricultural History Center is located within the park boundaries. The farm has reconstructed and historic buildings from the mid-19th century through the mid-20th century. The DORBA Mountain Bike Trail was designed, built and is maintained by Dallas Off-Road Bike Association. This trail is 12 miles long and consists of three concentric paths—3 miles (Short), 8 miles (Middle) and 12 miles (Outer).
For assistance using this map, contact the park. Cedar Hill State Park TexasStateParks.org/App • CHECK OUT time is 12 p.m. or renew permit by 9 a.m. (pending site availability). Urban Fish & Wildlife Office • CHECK IN time is 2 p.m. Early arrival is pending site availability. Headquarters • Public consumption or display of any alcoholic beverage is prohibited. • Only one unit is permitted to hook up to utilities per site. Restrooms • A maximum of eight people permitted per campsite. Guests must leave the park by 10 p.m. Quiet time is from 10 p.m. – 6 a.m. • Pets must be kept on leash. Please pick up after them. • Valid permit required on windshield of each vehicle in park. All vehicles to remain on pavement. • Excess parking fee is required at campsites with more than two vehicles (including trailers). • Please review complete Park Rules and Regulations posted at headquarters. • Trails may be closed due to wet conditions. Contact park headquarters for updates: (972) 291-3900, option 1. Chemical Toilet Primitive Sites (Hike-in) 279 280 Native Tall Grass Prairie 250 248 246 244 242 240 h 258 257 256 y. Pk w h an c Br nn Pe 61 62 H2 52 50 51 48 4 457 43 42 34 32 49 111 36 3 3 1 35 3 25 24 H1 27 F Boat Ramp 55 29 Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. G2 15 13 66 8 6 TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. 89 7 8 67 wy. G1 90 88 5 14 6 14 Multiple facilities are handicapped accessible. Lakeview Camping Area Sites 160-230 50/30/20 amp 182 181 180 179 178 177 176 175 227 174 229 225 173 30 2 172 91 30 171 17 28 16 0 26 14 8 4 1 9 7 67 150 23 64 63 116 168 Eagle Ford 149 16 4 16 65 2 1 1 5 Camping Area 1 21 152 16 67 19 22 0 85 154 Sites 79-150 1553 69 86 17 15 156 84 83 50/30/20 157 158 70 20 81 5 73 71 amp 159 7 82 72 18 80 76 79 78 16 2 4 14 12 77 1 3 5 7 9 11 166 5 16 63 1 Road pine hS t r No To H © 2021 TPWD PWD MP P4503-131L (2/21) 199 193 200 195 218 202 20 1 216 203 05 214 2 4 0 2 206 207 208 2 09 210 211 212 102 112 100 58 110 128 126 101 57 0 13 99 1 59 114 129 27 113 98 132 116 97 60 5 11 4 131 96 6 117 119 134 118 44 95 133 1 121 23 94 125 122 93 124 2 120 9 184 6 8 10 M 191 109 108 107 104 13 136 135 1 140 8 14442 13 137 143 141 9 188 190 192 J1 7 85 3 18 1 18 224 226 228 233 FIRES • Campfires are permitted only in fire rings provided at each site. No ground fires are permitted. Please, use extreme caution with any burning materials during the high-fire danger summer brings. Group Picnic Pavilion Parking N • Firewood is available for purchase at park headquarters. Picnic Area 235 Hog Wallow Camping Area Sites 231-280 30/20 amp • Gathering of firewood is prohibited. Interpretive Trail Designated Swimming Area 189 186 Trail Biking Trail CLOSED FOR RENOVATIONS 231 Talala Hiking Trail • Vessels are not allowed in the swimming area and must observe the No Wake rules, particularly in the boat-launch area. Vessels are not allowed to tie up in the boat-launch area. • Stop the spread of invasive species. CLEAN, DRAIN and DRY your boat. Penn Farm Agricultural History Center Scenic Overlook • If your vessel will not start, clear the ramp area. 220 221 223 N1 • Always swim with a friend. Children must be supervised by an adult who can swim. 259 237 232 d 284 282 • No boat clean-up or swimming in the ramp area. 255 25 252 3 251 249 247 245 243 241 239 236 292 290 288 286 • No pets or glass containers allowed in swimming area. 254 234 oa Native Tall Grass Prairie 291 289 28 28 7 28 5 28 3 1 Dump Station 2 296 294 • Have your vessel ready to launch before getting to the ramp area. Launch your vessel and clear the ramp area. Do not block the ramp area. 198 196 ne R Spi 297 295 293 6 27 7 27 8 27 • Swim at your own risk. NO LIFEGUARD on duty. 22 298 4 27 275 301 299 300 Sout 273 Full Hookup Sites 194 Coyote Camping Area Sites 281-355 30/20 amp 9 26 71 2 BOAT LAUNCH PROTOCOL 197 os 270 272 264 263 262 261 260 WATER ACTIVITIES 213 215 217 219 Native Tall Grass Prairie ed Duck Pond 266 332 330 333 329 7 2 5 3 3 334 3 328 3 3 337 33 6 325 8 26 3 3 340 32 324 339 342 341 321 322 310 343 3457 312 34 311 344 309 313 314 308 346 349 315 8 4 3 0 320 305 307 35 303 306 316 351 352 304 354 53 317 3 319 318 302 355 Crossing Du ck Po nd Tr
600 0' 55 1570 West FM 1382 Cedar Hill, TX 75104 (972) 291-3900 www.texasstateparks.org 600' ' Cedar Hill State Park Trails Map Shady Ridge Camping Area Note: this portion LEGEND Eagle Ford Camping Area of the park road is closed for construction. Headquarters Restrooms Parking Boat Ramp Fishing Jetty Scenic Overlook Water/Electric Camping Full Hookup Campsites Primitive Campsites Pavilion Swimming Area Toilet - Composting Boat Ramp Day-use Area West FM 13 82 Belt L ine R oad Painted Buntings 731' ' 650 750' 550' 600' 700' Lakeview Camping Area 0.10 0.08 600' 548' 0.9 8 An entrance permit is required for all visitors to the park. Visit the park headquarters at the main entrance off West FM 1382. 0' 1 0.05 06 0. 55 658' 600' Hog Wallow Camping Area NOTES: 0.11 0.15 Penn Farm Trail 0.6 mi. 0.08 6 550' Talala Trail 2.3 mi. 2 All trails allow multi-use unless otherwise indicated. Contour intervals are 10 feet. Trail lengths are in miles. Elevation levels are in feet. To 51 0. 0.18 65 600' 5 0' Perch Pond y6 7 0' Map compiled by Texas State Parks staff. 0.2 4 60 3 Hw 0.02 0.1 3 Coyote Crossing Camping Area No claims are made to the accuracy of the data or its suitability to a particular use. 0' 75 65 0' Park Entrance 0. 5 0' 75 700' 0' 55 0.02 0' ' 60 550 To Interstate 20 Joe Pool Lake Plum Valley Trail 0.8 mi. 0.23 DORBA Trail (Short) 3.0 mi. 4 7 0.0 7 0.1 POINTS OF INTEREST 0.07 Duck Pond Trail 0.8 mi. Duck 0.12 Pond (GPS coordinates shown in decimal degrees) 0' 0.1 1 PENN FARM 2 TALALA OVERLOOK 65 0.04 33 0. Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. 32.6242° -96.9866° The Penn Family farmed this valley for over 100 years. Remnant buildings and farm equipment transport us back to a middle-class farm around the turn of the 20th century. 1.01 0' 0. 29 55 808' 3.03 ' 550 2.44 ' 700 750' 600' 1.41 32.6175° -96.9875° Talala is the Cherokee Indian name for "woodpecker". Enjoy the breathtaking view from the overlook, one of several at the park. 3 PERCH POND 4 DUCK POND 5 PLUM VALLEY OVERLOOK 32.6135° -96.9826° This scenic overlook provides views of the Tallgrass Blackland Prairie converging with the 85 0 White' Rock Limestone Escarpment. 32.6128° -96.9970° A favorite place for kids to fish, a boardwalk over the water invites all ages for a view of swimming fish or turtles. 800' DORBA Trail (Medium) 8.0 mi. 650' 55 0' 76' 600' ' 750 15 0. 4 850' 55 0' 800' DORBA Trail (Long) 12.0 mi. 32.6085° -96.9888° 829' the children for an easy hike to the pond, Bring where you may catch a glimpse of wildlife stopping by for a drink. 0' 65 843' In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. © 2020 Texas Parks and Wildlife Department PWD MP P4503-0131P (7/20) TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 781' Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. 591'
Cedar Hill State Park DORBA Unit Trails Map LEGEND 1570 West FM 1382 Cedar Hill, TX 75104 (972) 291-3900 www.texasstateparks.org Parking Restrooms Day Use Area POINTS OF INTEREST NOTES: An entrance permit is required for all visitors to the park. Visit the park headquarters at the main entrance off West FM 1382. All trails allow multi-use unless otherwise indicated. Contour intervals are 10 feet. Trail lengths are in miles. Elevation levels are in feet. No claims are made to the accuracy of the data or its suitability to a particular use. Map compiled by Texas State Parks staff. Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. 1 BARRELS 14 BUSH’S SECRET GARDEN 2 WASHOUT HILL 15 12 MILE PRAIRIE 3 POISON IVY ALLEY 16 OVERLOOK 4 7 SISTERS 17 COPPERHEAD CORNER 5 COW CORNER 18 SNAKE EYES 6 5 POINTS 19 RATTLESNAKE ALLEY 7 BLUEBONNET PRAIRIE 20 CACTUS PRAIRIE 8 FLUSCHE CROSSING 21 BUTTERFLY BRIDGE 9 BOBSLED 22 LAKESIDE PRAIRIE 10 GERONIMO 23 2 MILE BRIDGE 11 #7 WASHOUT BRIDGE 24 CAVEMAN CROSSING 12 8-12 SPLIT 25 THE SHOOT 13 HILLTOP BEND 26 SNAKEHEAD BRIDGE In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. © 2019 Texas Parks and Wildlife Department PWD MP P4503-0131Q (7/19) TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. Cedar Hill State Park - DORBA Unit Take to the trails for adventure! TRAIL DIST TIME DIFFICULTY DESCRIPTION DORBA TRAIL (LONG) 12 miles Biking: 2 hours Hiking: 6 hours Challenging Named for the Dallas Off Road Biking Association, three consecutive trails were built by mountain bikers. Intense riding crisscrosses over 1,000 acres of prime mountain bike landscape. Remnants of historic Texas Blackland Prairie provide important habitat for prairie wildlife and migratory birds here at Cedar Hill. The clay-like consistency of the soil becomes very tacky when wet. In order to prevent erosion along the trails, they’re often closed on rainy days. Be sure to check with the office for any trail closures! DORBA TRAIL (MEDIUM) 8 miles Biking: 1 hr. 20 min. Hiking: 4 hours Challenging Covering 8 miles of trail, our blue loop is perfect for that dedicated hiker or biker. Remember, hikers should travel counterclockwise, while bikers travel clockwise. DORBA TRAIL (SHORT) 3 miles Biking: 30 min. Hiking: 1 hr. 30 min. Challenging One of our most popular hiking trails, this route offers views of the lake and plenty of shade. At 3 miles, it’s also more rugged and challenging than some of our other trails. STAYING SAFE KNOW YOUR LIMITS. Prepare for sun and heat. Wear sunscreen, insect repellent and appropriate clothing/hiking shoes. DRINK PLENTY OF WATER. DRINK PLENTY OF WATER. Your body quickly loses fluids when you’re on the trail. Bring a quart (32 oz.) of water per hour of activity. Bringing your furry-friend? Don’t forget water for them, too! TELL OTHERS WHERE YOU’LL BE. If possible, avoid exploring alone. Tell someone where you are going and when you plan to return. WEAR A HELMET. When biking, always ride to your skill level. Wear a helmet to protect yourself in case of a crash. TRAIL ETIQUETTE Trash your trash. Keep the park natural. Pack out all of your trash and Leave No Trace. Leave feeding to nature. Feeding wild animals will make them sick and more likely to cause harm to people. Pick your path. Bicyclists travel clockwise, while hikers should travel counterclockwise on these trails. Be courteous! Cyclists yield to hikers. POTENTIALLY HARMFUL PLANTS AND ANIMALS LIVE HERE. You’ll see them more easily if you stay on trails. BRING A MAP. Keep an eye on trail signs to help orient you in case of an emergency. FOR EMERGENCIES, PLEASE CALL 9-1-1. For information on Texas State Parks, visit www.texasstateparks.org Wildflowers Sign up today for free email updates: texasstateparks.org/email /texasparksandwildlife @TPWDparks #TxStateParks Sponsor: Whole Earth Provision Co.
texas parks and wildlife ENJOY THE PARK We hope you enjoy your visit to Cedar Hill State Park. Here are some things to do at the park: • Take a hike on the Talala Trail or Duck Pond Trail. • Learn more about the plants and wildlife in the park by attending an interpretive program. • Ask for the “Birds of Cedar Hill State Park” field checklist and go birding. • Tour historic Penn Farm. Check the event calendar for guided tours or explore on your own with a self-guided brochure. • Go fishing in Joe Pool Lake or at Perch Pond in the park. • Attend events hosted by the park, such as the Caroling at Penn Farm in December. Check the Calendar of Events on the website. You can be a partner in conserving the natural and cultural resources of the Cedar Hill State Park by: • Leaving no trace as you camp or recreate. If you pack it in, pack it out! • Staying on established trails while hiking, biking or riding to prevent soil erosion and damage to the prairie grasses; and staying off the trails when they are closed after a rain. Interpretive Guide to: RICH IN DIVERSITY Today many acres of prairie grasslands lie beneath the surface of Joe Pool Lake as it captures the waters of Mountain Creek and Walnut Creek. The creation of the lake inundated a number of small family farms. However, the farmstead established by John Wesley Penn in 1859 is preserved within the park, a reminder of the agricultural legacy of early Dallas County. CEDAR HILL STATE PARK AND PENN FARM AGRICULTURAL HISTORY CENTER thIS area is named for its rugged limestone bluffs covered with forests of dark green cedars. Settlers came here for the rich soils and abundant • Helping create and maintain trails by volunteering for a group such as the Dallas Off-Road Bicycle Association (D.O.R.B.A.); visit www.dorba.org to find out more. grasses of the TALLGRASS • Volunteering as a park host. Hosts are needed to help in the campgrounds or with office duties, interpretation or maintenance. harbors endangered prairie Cedar Hill State Park 1570 F.M. 1382, Cedar Hill, TX 75104 (972) 291-3900 • www.tpwd.texas.gov/cedarhill/ Blackland Prairie. The park r e m n a n t s , s m a l l pi e c e s of the tallgrass prairie that once stretched all the way to Canada. Proud Sponsor of Texas Parks and Wildlife Programs © 2015 TPWD. PWD BR P4503-131O (7/15) In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. The park is biologically diverse due to the convergence of two ecosystems. The grasslands of the Texas Blackland Prairie and the upland forests of the White Rock Limestone Escarpment create a transitional habitat zone, supporting plants and animals commonly found in North Central Texas, East Texas, or the Texas Hill Country. A rich combination of grassland and forest provides an ideal habitat for migratory birds. The park’s bird list includes almost 200 species, including year-round residents such as the e­astern bluebird and great-horned owl, and seasonal favorites such as the colorful painted bunting. Red-tailed hawks are among the many species that rely on the grasslands. C E D A R H I L L S T A T E P A R K A N D P E N N F A R M A G R I C U L T U R A L H I S T O R Y C E N T E R UNDERSTANDING THE PRAIRIE Texas Blackland Prairie Ecoregion T he Penn family owned this farm for over a century. It is representative of the small, middle-class farmsteads that once occupied this margin of Dallas County. The site shows an evolution of structures constructed or adapted by the Penn family as needs changed and modern conveniences were added. It also serves as a reminder that humans made the greatest impact on the tallgrass prairie. Farmers such as John Wesley Penn utilized the rich natural resources of the land to build farms and provide shelter for their families. The Penn family grazed cattle and horses on the native prairie grasses for over a hundred years. Over time, most of the tallgrass prairie in Dallas County vanished— plowed under and replaced with crops of wheat or cotton. Perhaps because of the rocky surface and the hilly terrain of the “cedar mountains,” prairie remnants at Penn Farm survived. The continued survival of these prairie remnants depends on our efforts to conserve them by managing, appreciating and protecting them from encroaching developmen
PeNn Farm cedar hill state park SELF-GUIDED TOUR Origin of Penn Farm Historically, Blackland Prairie covered the land of Cedar Hill. Pioneer settlers moved to the Blackland Prairies in the early 1820s when news spread about the fertile soil and pastureland. This led to a dramatic increase in agricultural development in north Texas. On October 24, 1854, the Penn family left Sangamon County, Illinois to move to Cedar Hill, Texas in a covered wagon. Their wagon train included Major John Penn, his wife Nancy, their six children, and several neighboring families. They arrived in Cedar Hill on December 8, 1854. The Penns created a homestead near Wheatland (several miles northeast of Cedar Hill) and grew wheat, corn, oats, and barley and raised horses, sheep, and cattle. Major John Anderson Penn Throughout the next decade, Major Penn acquired over 2,200 acres of land and gave 800 acres to his son, John Wesley, to raise cattle. John Wesley’s parcel expanded to 1,200 acres and became Penn Farm. THINK ABOUT IT Has your family ever moved to a brand new place? At the first trail split, turn left towards the 1859 FARMHOUSE. a working farm In 1859, John Wesley married Lucinda Moore and built the first FARMHOUSE on the property, originally a single room with front and back porches. The Penns and their five children lived in this small one-room house. In 1911, the right addition was constructed for tenant farmers—farmers who worked for the Penns and were provided a room and land to grow crops. The Penns primarily raised beef cattle, milk cows, chickens, and pigs for food. They also had horses and mules for farm work. The men’s responsibilities included land cultivation, the animals, equipment repair, and farm buildings. The women’s responsibilities included raising the children, canning food, chopping wood, laundry, growing a heritage garden, and cooking. Farming was predominantly completed by tenant families and the two slaves who lived on the property. Tenant farmers grew oats and grains and sold half their crops for profit and gave the other half to the Penn family for rent payment. John Wesley Penn Lucinda Penn The building across from the Farmhouse is the SOUTH GRANARY. This granary is the earliest intact example of a 19th century granary found in north Texas. Granaries were used to store grain and fodder (animal feed) on farms. Continue down the path to find the SOUTH CHICKEN COOP. This coop was built in the 1930-40s. The children collected eggs every morning. THINK ABOUT IT What type of chores do/did you do as a child? Walk around the Farmhouse to find the SMOKEHOUSE. This building was built in 1920 and despite being called a Smokehouse, there is no indication that it was used as one. It was named because of its location behind the house. It was used for food storage and appears to have later been used as a chicken coop or rabbit hutch for winter food. Continue down the path towards the WATER TANK. This water cistern was constructed in the early 20th century to store drinking water for cattle. Walk down the path to find the NORTH GRANARY on the left. This is another fodder storage building. Notice that there is an addition to this structure with rain gutters. This extension was added in 1917 as a garage for the family’s automobile, a Ford Model T. Proceed down the path towards the DOUBLE CRIB BARN on the left. The Double Crib Barn is the oldest Penn-built structure on the site, built before 1859. It was common practice for farmers to build farm buildings prior to domestic buildings to house and feed their livestock. Originally, the Double Crib Barn housed livestock and fodder, then was used to store grain after the new barn was built. In front of the Double Crib Barn is another cement WATER TANK which was built in the late 1880s. Across from the Double Crib Barn is the JACK BARN. This barn was built between 1890-1900. The Penns kept donkeys (a male donkey is called a “Jack” and a female donkey is called a “Jenny”). The interior portion of the barn was used to store hay. The concrete was added later during farm restoration. Continue down the path towards the MAIN BARN. John wesley’s legacy In 1888, a western diamondback rattlesnake bit and killed John Wesley at age 55. Lucinda inherited controlling interest of the farm until their children, Andy and Sidney, were old enough to manage it. Andy inherited Lucinda’s portion of the farm after she passed away in 1928 (she was 87 years old). Andy managed the farm through the hardships of the Great Depression and, by WWII, had reduced the number of cattle and maintained fewer acres of cultivated land. Andy Penn Sidney Penn Wa Tow Water Tank Double Crib Barn Water Tank Main Barn Jack Barn North Granary Water Tank Smokehouse 1859 Farmhouse South Chicken Coop South Granary Parking Lot & Restroom Pump House Garage Windmill ater wer 1876 Farmhouse Root Cellar Farm Office North Chicken Coop Tenant’s House r PeNn Farm START the 20th century Andy Pen
Come Paw Through our Pages cedar hill state park activity guide Welcome to Cedar Hill State Park and Penn Farm. Today you’ll have the chance to learn about some local history and natural sciences. There are many things to see, learn and do at the park. We hope you enjoy your time here. The Penn Farm Tour and other programs offered at Cedar Hill State Park will open the door for enjoying the rich history in this area and nurture an appreciation for the environment. The games and information in this guide book are meant to enhance your experience. Other Programs Offered: Penn Farm Tour Pond Walk Talala Trail Hike Fuzzy and Furry Friends Our Scaly Skinned Friends Get To Know the Trees Birding Basics Kid’s Wilderness Survival About the cover: This is a picture of a bobcat. It is rare to see a bobcat, but it isn’t impossible. Keep your eyes open and you may catch a glimpse of some of the animals that live at Cedar Hill State Park. Cedar Hill State Park Pledge I will: • Treat all wildlife with kindness and respect. • Bring home only pictures and memories. • Do my best to have a safe and fun time. • Stay on the trail. • Leave no trace, by packing trash out and throwing it in the dumpster. • Recycle when possible. • Be quiet and polite to others. • Leave my area cleaner than I found it. • Swim only in posted areas and with an adult. Signature of Park Protector Witness to the Park Protector Pledge: Signature of Parent or Participating Adult Get t o K n o w t h e Tr ee s The Mountain Cedar is also known as Ash Juniper. Cedar Hill State Park got its name from the abundance of this shrub-like tree. It has bark that peels in strips. The leaves are short and scale-like. Settlers used to brew the leaves to make a tea that has a high concentration of vitamin C. Most people that are allergic to this tree are allergic to the male tree that produces the tiny cones, which release pollen. The female tree produces small blue berries. The Cedar Elm is sometimes called the “winged elm” due to new twig growth often producing small wing-like scales. The elm’s branches are very dense and grow slightly downward. The leaves feel rough, like fine sandpaper when rubbed. The cedar elm can grow up to 80 feet tall. The Post Oak got its name from farmers and ranchers, who used its wood to make fence posts. It can grow to 70 feet tall. The Post oak’s leaves are leathery and deeply lobed. This tree produces acorns, which many animals eat. Most of the ones you see at the Park are 100 to 400 years old. The Mesquite, also known as the Honey Mesquite, has become one of the most common trees in Texas. The seeds are a beanpod type fruit, that are eaten by coyotes and some other wildlife. Native Americans used this tree to make black dye and a cement for mending pottery. The thorns on its branches were used like safety pins in the Civil War. The Honey Locust can grow over 50 feet tall, with smooth bark. Thorns can grow out of the trunk and branches. A bird called the Northern Shrike will stick its prey onto the thorns and settlers used the thorns as sewing needles. Bobcats have been known to eat the seed pods of the tree. 2 L e a f I l l u s t r a t i o ns Shapes Linear Elliptic Ovate Spatulate Margins Simple Undulate Serrated Lobed Types Simple Palmate Compound Arrangements Alternate Opposite 3 A ct i v i - Tr e e Have you ever made a leaf rubbing? All you need is a crayon, some paper, a leaf and a hard surface. Use the space below to make a leaf rubbing. Place the paper on the leaf, then rub it with the side of your crayon. Try different leaves, or coins, or even old gravestones. Remember, leave whatever you find where you found it! Fun facts about trees! n Moss and lichens usually grow on the north side of a tree. n Baseball bats are often made of ash wood, because of its flexibility. These trees grow straight most of the time. n A gall is a tree’s reaction to an insect laying an egg on it. The outside is actually part of the tree and in the middle is the developing egg or larva. n The Soapberry tree has berries, and the liquid from the berry was used to make soap. 4 Pe nn F a r m H i s t o r y L e sso n The park has more to offer than just the study of natural history. It also can give a glimpse of the past and the family who lived on the farm. Around 1850, John Anderson Penn went to California and found gold. In 1854, John Penn and his family moved from Illinois and settled in Texas. Like many farmers, they grew wheat, corn, oats and barley. John also managed herds of horses, sheep and cattle with his sons. In the late 1850s, son John Wesley Penn became sole owner of 1,100 acres, known as Penn Farm. In 1859, John Wesley Penn married Lucinda Moore and they built a frame house. A tool called an adz was used to shape the logs of this barn and the jack barn. Most of their money was made by raising and selling cattle. During the Civil War, John and two of his brothers joined the Confederate Army where his brother
BIRDS OF THE Oaks and Prairies and Osage Plains of Texas A F I E L D C H EC K L I ST BY BRUSH FREEMAN ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This is the fifth ecoregional bird checklist for Texas in a series initiated by Texas Partners in Flight under the direction of Cliff Shackelford at Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. The following reviewers commented on an early version of this checklist: Fred Collins, Bert Frenz, Cliff Shackelford, and Ken Steigman. Also of great assistance in the development of this checklist were Keith Arnold, Kelly Cotten, Tim Fennell, Jeff Hanson, Mark Lockwood, Willie Sekula, and Matt White. We thank the Migratory Bird Office, Region 2 of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for support. Cover: Illustration of Dickcissel and Red-headed Woodpecker by Rob Fleming. This checklist is dedicated to Rob, who died before this checklist was originally printed in 2003. His artwork has graced many of the department’s bird publications for years. He will be missed. Birds of the Oaks and Prairies and Osage Plains of Texas: A Field Checklist INTRODUCTION T he areas covered in this checklist include a rich birdlife from the western edge of the more eastern forested areas gradually changing to a more western grassland influence (Fig. 1). These two ecoregions are commonly known by other names; for example, the Oaks and Prairies refer to both the Post Oak Belt or Post Oak Savannah and the Blackland Prairie (including the Grand Prairie). The Osage Plains is commonly referred to as the (Western) Cross Timbers. Examples of some of the subregions in this coverage area include The Lost Pines, a variety of smaller prairies including the Grand Prairie, Fayette Prairie, and San Antonio Prairie. For a brief yet excellent description of the major plant communities, please see pages 14-16 in Texas Wildscapes: Gardening for Wildlife by Noreen Damude and Kelly Conrad Bender published in 1999 by Texas Parks and Wildlife Press (ISBN: 1-885696-30-2). A total of 471 species has been documented within the two combined areas. Since these areas lie almost in the middle of Texas and extend mostly in a north-south fashion, the avifauna is truly diverse. This checklist is the first of its kind for the coverage area and uses ecological boundaries instead of political ones. The checklist follows the nomenclature and taxonomy as published in the 7th edition of the A.O.U. Check-list of North American Birds (1998) and its supplements. Haskell Baylor Archer Throckmorton Young ShackelStephens ford Montague Grayson Denton Wise Jack Parker Palo Pinto Tarrant Collin Eastland Johnson Somervell Erath Ellis Hamilton Henderson Anderson Freestone McLennan Limestone Leon Falls Robertson Bell Milam Oaks and Prairies Madison Brazos Williamson Burleson Osage Plains Lee Travis Comal Washington Bastrop Hays Caldwell Austin Fayette Colorado Guadalupe Gonzales DeWitt Figure 1. Coverage area of this checklist Goliad 1 Grimes Lavaca Red River Wood Van Zandt Navarro Bosque Coryell Adjacent ecoregions Hopkins Rains Rockwall Dallas Hill Brown Hunt Kaufman Comanche Coleman Fannin Delta Hood Callahan Cooke Franklin Lamar Clay Oaks and Prairies Waller Osage Plains There is no shortage of open water in the region due to a large number of manmade reservoirs. There are dozens of such impoundments, most of which occur in the northeast part of the coverage area. These bodies of water have produced some of the most surprising records in the region; products of an altered ecosystem. A number of species in this checklist are considered very local or confined to either a southern or northern extreme. For example, Brown-crested Flycatchers will only be found in the southern portion of the coverage area, while American Tree Sparrows or Horned Grebes are primarily found in the northern part. It is also important to understand that most birds show preferences for specific habitat types; a good working knowledge of these preferences will provide the observer the ability to master the birds of the area. A wide variety of published material was used to construct this booklet, including local bird checklists, published materials, records published in ABA’s North American Birds (formerly Field Notes), the Texas On-line Clearinghouse www.texasbirding.net/txclrhouse/, many personal communications with other area-experts, and information provided by the Texas Bird Records Committee. Almost 35 years of birding experience in the region by the author was also used to develop this checklist. The abundance codes for some species are subjective evaluations where published data were insufficient. LEGEND Abundant......................................... Common......................................... Uncommon..................................... Rare................................................ Very rare to casual........................... Accidental or single occurrence...... Lingering single occurrence...........
CEDAR HILL SP BIRD CHECKLIST This checklist is a list of common and specialty birds seen in the park. Staff and volunteers have used previous checklists as well as eBird data to compile these lists. This list should not be used as a comprehensive list of birds seen in this park. Please help us protect the natural avian communities by refraining from using playback tapes of bird songs. Thank you for your cooperation. Waterfowl ___ Canada Goose ___ Wood Duck ___ Blue-winged Teal ___ Northern Shoveler ___ Gadwall ___ American Wigeon ___ Mallard ___ Northern Pintail ___ Green-winged Teal ___ Canvasback ___ Redhead ___ Ring-necked Duck ___ Lesser Scaup ___ Bufflehead ___ Ruddy Duck Grebes ___ Pied-billed Grebe ___ Horned Grebe Pigeons and Doves ___ Rock Pigeon ___ Eurasian Collared-Dove ___ White-winged Dove ___ Mourning Dove ___ ___ ___ ___ Franklin’s Gull Ring-billed Gull Herring Gull Forster’s Tern Loons ___ Common Loon Cormorants and Anhingas ___ Neotropic Cormorant ___ Double-crested Cormorant Pelicans ___ American White Pelican Herons, Ibis, and Allies ___ Great Blue Heron ___ Great Egret ___ Snowy Egret ___ Little Blue Heron ___ Cattle Egret ___ Green Heron ___ Yellow-crowned Night-Heron Swifts ___ Chimney Swift Vultures, Hawks, and Allies ___ Black Vulture ___ Turkey Vulture ___ Osprey ___ Mississippi Kite ___ Northern Harrier ___ Sharp-shinned Hawk ___ Cooper’s Hawk ___ Bald Eagle ___ Red-shouldered Hawk ___ Broad-winged Hawk ___ Red-tailed Hawk Hummingbirds ___ Ruby-throated Hummingbird ___ Black-chinned Hummingbird Owls ___ Eastern Screech-Owl ___ Great Horned Owl Rails, Gallinules, and Allies ___ American Coot Kingfishers ___ Belted Kingfisher Shorebirds ___ Killdeer ___ Least Sandpiper ___ Wilson’s Snipe ___ Spotted Sandpiper ___ Greater Yellowlegs ___ Lesser Yellowlegs Woodpeckers ___ Yellow-bellied Sapsucker ___ Red-bellied Woodpecker ___ Downy Woodpecker ___ Ladder-backed Woodpecker ___ Northern Flicker Cuckoos ___ Greater Roadrunner ___ Yellow-billed Cuckoo Nightjars ___ Chuck-will’s-widow Gulls, Terns, and Skimmers ___ Bonaparte’s Gull Falcons and Caracaras ___ American Kestrel ___ Merlin Tyrant Flycatchers: Pewees, Kingbirds, and Allies ___ Eastern Wood-Pewee ___ Least Flycatcher ___ Eastern Phoebe ___ Great Crested Flycatcher ___ Western Kingbird ___ Eastern Kingbird ___ Scissor-tailed Flycatcher Starlings and Mynas ___ European Starling Shrikes ___ Loggerhead Shrike Finches and Allies ___ House Finch ___ Pine Siskin ___ American Goldfinch Vireos ___ White-eyed Vireo ___ Red-eyed Vireo Jays, Magpies, Crows, and Ravens ___ Blue Jay ___ American Crow Larks ___ Horned Lark Martins and Swallows ___ Northern Rough-winged Swallow ___ Purple Martin ___ Tree Swallow ___ Barn Swallow ___ Cliff Swallow Tits, Chickadees, and Titmice ___ Carolina Chickadee ___ Tufted Titmouse Treecreepers ___ Brown Creeper Wrens ___ ___ ___ ___ House Wren Winter Wren Carolina Wren Bewick’s Wren Gnatcatchers ___ Blue-gray Gnatcatcher Kinglets ___ Golden-crowned Kinglet ___ Ruby-crowned Kinglet Thrushes ___ Eastern Bluebird ___ Hermit Thrush ___ American Robin Catbirds, Mockingbirds, and Thrashers ___ Gray Catbird ___ Brown Thrasher ___ Northern Mockingbird Wagtails and Pipits ___ American Pipit Waxwings ___ Cedar Waxwing Old World Sparrows ___ House Sparrow New World Sparrows ___ Grasshopper Sparrow ___ Chipping Sparrow ___ Clay-colored Sparrow ___ Field Sparrow ___ Lark Sparrow ___ Fox Sparrow ___ Dark-eyed Junco ___ White-crowned Sparrow ___ Harris’s Sparrow ___ White-throated Sparrow ___ Vesper Sparrow ___ Savannah Sparrow ___ Song Sparrow ___ Lincoln’s Sparrow ___ Swamp Sparrow ___ Spotted Towhee ___ Eastern Towhee Blackbirds ___ Eastern Meadowlark ___ Red-winged Blackbird ___ Brown-headed Cowbird ___ Common Grackle ___ Great-tailed Grackle Wood-Warblers ___ Orange-crowned Warbler ___ Nashville Warbler ___ Common Yellowthroat ___ Yellow Warbler ___ Pine Warbler ___ Yellow-rumped Warbler ___ Black-throated Green Warbler Cardinals, Grosbeaks, and Allies ___ Summer Tanager ___ Northern Cardinal ___ Blue Grosbeak ___ Indigo Bunting ___ Painted Bunting ___ Dickcissel © 2019 TPWD PWD CD P4503-0131R (5/19) Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Servic
Cedar Hill S TAT E PA R K PRAIRIES AND LAKES Cedar Hill STATE PARK Rugged, cedar-covered hills and scenic lake views of Joe Pool Lake span the horizons at Cedar Hill State Park. Just minutes away from the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex, this 1,900-acre natural preserve offers the visitor camping and picnicking along with cool water-based recreation such as swimming, fishing, waterskiing and sailing. For an educational glimpse into the past, the restored 1950s farmstead of John Wesley Penn (whose family settled here in the 1850s) affords fascinating insights into the pre-agribusiness era of farming. Camping: Mostly wooded sites with water, electricity, and sewer, shade shelter or shade trees, picnic table and ground-level grill. Primitive sites, too. Group Facilities: Group picnic pavilion with electricity and lights. Fishing: Two lighted fishing jetties, a children’s Perch Pond, and wooden fishing deck. Popular species include largemouth bass, crappie and catfish. Swimming: Swimming beach (no lifeguards). Boating: Two concrete boat ramps with 10 total lanes, and lighted boat-trailer parking. Picnicking: Picnic tables and grills. Trails: Over 15 miles of hiking and biking trails. to Dallas Grand Prairie to Fort Worth 20 Duncanville Cedar Hill State Park Cedar Hill 67 1382 Mansfield Road Centrally located in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex, four miles south of I-20 on FM 1382. Cedar Hill State Park 1570 W. FM 1382, Cedar Hill, TX 75104 • (972) 291-3900 www.texasstateparks.org Rates and reservations: (512) 389-8900. For info only: (800) 792-1112. Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. © 2019 TPWD PWD CD P4503-131H (8/19) In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041.
-Official- FA C I L I T I E S MAPS Get the Mobile App: ACTIVITIES texasstateparks.org/app Toyota Tundra Let your sense of adventure be your guide with the Toyota Official Vehicle of the Texas Parks & Wildlife Foundation Tundra — built to help you explore all that the great state of Texas has to offer. | toyota.com/trucks BUILT HERE. LIVES HERE. ASSEMBLED IN TEXAS WITH U.S. AND GLOBALLY SOURCED PARTS. Contents 4 6 8 10 Activities and Programs Parks Near You Places to Stay Recreational Vehicles 12 Tips for Time in Nature Ray Roberts Devils River 14 Visitor Fees and Passes Directory TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT 18 Big Bend Country 26 34 48 56 64 80 86 Gulf Coast TPW COMMISSION S. Reed Morian, Chairman Houston Arch “Beaver” Aplin, III, Vice-Chairman Lake Jackson James E. Abell Kilgore Oliver J. Bell Cleveland Anna B. Galo Laredo Jeffery D. Hildebrand Houston Jeanne W. Latimer San Antonio Robert L. “Bobby” Patton, Jr. Fort Worth Dick Scott Wimberley T. Dan Friedkin, Chairman-Emeritus Houston Lee Marshall Bass, Chairman-Emeritus Fort Worth Hill Country Panhandle Plains Pineywoods Prairies and Lakes South Texas Plains Carter P. Smith Executive Director Rodney Franklin State Parks Director Josh Havens Communications Director Facilities and Activities Index 44 State Parks Map Special thanks to Toyota and advertisers, whose generous support made this guide possible. Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Cover photo: Tyler State Park, Chase Fountain Texas State Parks Official Guide, Seventeenth Edition © TPWD PWD BK P4000-000A (5/20) TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. WELCOME from Rodney Franklin, State Parks Director   Texas contains some of the most diverse public lands in the country. There is a wealth of cultural heritage. Wildlife abounds, landscapes flourish with beauty and our history is abundant. Your state parks are a part of the legacy that makes Texas proud. The people of Texas recently helped secure that legacy for future generations by voting yes to Proposition 5. Thank you! These 630,000-plus acres showcase some of our state’s greatest treasures. Parks help people make memories with family and find respite in nature’s playground. They strengthen local economies and bind communities. Most of all, parks enable each of us to spend time outside to recharge, be healthy and relax in our own way. I invite you to enjoy your state parks, exploring the best of Texas with friends and family. The parks are here for you. They belong to you. Please visit, have fun, and help protect them forever! Thank you, Texas! Texans voted to approve passage of Proposition 5 in the November 5, 2019 election. Now 100% of the sporting goods sales tax will go to fund the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and Texas Historical Commission. This funding will help secure the future of local parks, state parks and historic sites for generations to come, all without increasing taxes. We would like to extend our deepest gratitude. See what’s in store for Texas State Parks: texasstateparks.org/better ACTIVITIES & PROGRAMS What is there to do in state parks? Enjoy a family picnic, tour a hallowed historic site or choose from some of these visitor favorites: Bike Pedal across parks at any speed, in any style, with any group. Choose the routes, surfaces and distances that fit your comfort zone. Walk Start with a shorter loop, tackle tougher terrain or join a guided tour. Fish Fish without a license in as many as 70 state parks. Many offer tackle loaner programs and special learnto-fish events. Boat or Paddle Rent canoes and kayaks, explore a Texas Paddling Trail or launch a boat. View Wildlife Discover the birds, mammals and plants that live in Texas. Many parks have signage and checklists to help you learn more about the wildlife around you. 4 Camp Swim Find a site that meets your needs. Test out new recipes, share your favorite stories and enjoy the stars. Beat the heat at creeks, rivers, lakes, springs, pools and ocean beaches. More information & reservations: texasstateparks.org (512) 389-8900 Many state parks offer special guided and self-guided progra
Guía de Parques INSTALACIONES Descarga la Aplicacíon Móvil MAPAS ACTIVIDADES texasstateparks.org/app ¡Los niños entran gratis! La entrada es gratis para los niños de 12 años y menores. Encuentra un parque: parquesdetexas.org Contenido Estero Llano Grande SP 2 4 6 8 9 10 18 Actividades y Programas Parques Cercanos Lugares para Quedarse Tarifas y Pases Directorio Mapa de Parques Instalaciones y Actividades BIENVENIDO Rodney Franklin, Director de Parques Texas tiene algunas de las tierras públicas más diversas del país, con una gran riqueza natural y cultural. La vida silvestre está por todas partes, los paisajes florecen con belleza, y la historia es abundante. Sus parques estatales son parte del legado que nos enorgullece. La gente de Texas ayuda a asegurar ese legado para las generaciones futuras al visitar y ser voluntarios. ¡Gracias! Estos más de 630,000 acres exhiben algunos de los grandes tesoros del estado. Los parques nos ayudan a crear recuerdos con la familia y a encontrar consuelo en la naturaleza. Los parques fortalecen las economías locales y unen a las comunidades. Sobre todo, los parques nos permiten pasar tiempo al aire libre para recargar energías, estar saludables y relajarnos a nuestra manera. Les invito a disfrutar de sus parques estatales, explorando lo mejor de Texas con amigos y familia. Los parques están aquí para todos. Nos pertenecen a todos. ¡Visítelos, diviértase y ayude a protegerlos para siempre! Foto de portada: Estero Llano State Park, Chase Fountain © 2021 TPWD PWD BK P4000-000A (5/21) TPWD recibe fondos del Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU. (USFWS por sus siglas en ingles). TPWD prohíbe la discriminación por raza, color, religión, nacionalidad de origen, discapacidad, edad y género, conforme la ley estatal y federal. Para solicitar un acomodo especial u obtener información en un formato alternativo, por favor contacte a TPWD en un Teléfono de Texto (TTY) al (512) 3898915 ó por medio de “Relay Texas” al 7-1-1 ó (800) 735-2989 ó por email a accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. Si usted cree que TPWD ha discriminado en su contra, favor de comunicarse con TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, o con el Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU., Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. De acuerdo con la Ley de Depósito del Estado de Texas, esta publicación está disponible en el centro de Distribución de Publicaciones del Estado de Texas y/o las Bibliotecas de Depósito de Texas. ACTIVIDADES Y PROGRAMAS ¿Qué puedo hacer en los parques estatales? ¡Disfruta de un día de campo, visita un sitio histórico o elige entre muchas otras opciones! Bicicletas Pedalea a lo largo de los parques a cualquier velocidad, en cualquier estilo, con cualquier grupo. Elige las rutas, el tipo de terreno y las distancias que cumplan con tu zona de confort. Caminatas Empieza con un circuito más corto, avanza a terrenos más difíciles o únete a una caminata guiada. Pescar Puedes pescar sin licencia en tantos como 70 parques estatales. Muchos parques ofrecen equipo para pescar a manera de préstamo y eventos especiales para aprender a pescar. Barcos Renta canoas y kayacs y explora uno de los senderos acuáticos en Texas. Nadar Animales Silvestres Acampar Descubre aves, mamíferos y plantas que tienen su hogar en Texas. Muchos parques tienen señalamientos y listados que te ayudan a aprender más. Encuentra un lugar que cumpla con lo que quieres. Prueba nuevas recetas, comparte historias favoritas y disfruta de las estrellas. 2 Más información y reservaciones: parquesdetexas.org Escape del calor en arroyos, ríos, lagos, manantiales, piletas y playas del mar. Tu seguridad en el agua es muy importante. Lleva el chaleco salvavidas. Aprende a nadar. Guarda a los niños. (512) 389-8900 ¡Pregunta en tu parque cuáles están disponibles! Los niños de 12 años y menores entran GRATIS Cielos Estrellados Escapa de las luces de la ciudad y goza de maravillosas vistas del cielo que no encontrarás en ninguna otra parte. Ven a una fiesta de estrellas o toma una excursión de constelaciones auto-guiada. Familias en la Naturaleza Elige un taller o diseña tu propia aventura. ¡Monta una tienda de campaña, cocina al exterior, prende una fogata y juega al exterior! Nosotros te Toma una publicación gratuita de actividades o pregunta por los paquetes gratuitos con los parques proporcionamos todo el equipo. No es necesario tener experiencia. participantes. Usa los binoculares, lupas, libros de bosquejos y libros de guías para explorar el parque. Mochilas para Exploradores Soldados Búfalo de Texas Descubre la historia con cuentos, vestuarios y herramientas. Sigue la pista de un animal, pesca con caña, cocina sobre una fogata, visita los fuertes y más. Adéntrate en las historias de vida de aquellos que sirvieron valientemente en los primeros regimientos Áfrico-Americanos de las Fuerzas Armadas. ! Seguridad en el Parque Ten cuidado con el agua Pr

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