Davis Mountains

State Park - Texas

Davis Mountains State Park is located in the Davis Mountains in Jeff Davis County, Texas. The closest town is Fort Davis, Texas. The park elevation is between 5,000 and 6,000 ft (1,500 and 1,800 m) above sea level. The park is next to the Fort Davis National Historic Site and the two are connected by four miles of hiking trails. Within the park is the "Indian Lodge", an adobe motel with thirty-nine rooms, sixteen that were built by the Civilian Conservation Corps during the 1930s (completed in 1939) and twenty-four added by Texas Parks and Wildlife in the 1967. A large bird blind next to the main road offers enclosed and open viewing areas for the many species of birds that are attracted to the feeders near the blind. The park has seven miles of equestrian trails in the special use Limpia Canyon Primitive Area, the section of the park north of Texas State Highway 118.

maps

Trails Map of Davis Mountains State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Davis Mountains - Trails Map

Trails Map of Davis Mountains State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

brochures

Interpretive Guide of Davis Mountains State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Davis Mountains - Brochure

Interpretive Guide of Davis Mountains State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Campground Map of Davis Mountains State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Davis Mountains - Map

Campground Map of Davis Mountains State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Trails Map of Davis Mountains State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Davis Mountains - Trails Map

Trails Map of Davis Mountains State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Birds of Davis Mountains State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Davis Mountains - Birds

Birds of Davis Mountains State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Rack Card of Davis Mountains State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Davis Mountains - Rack Card

Rack Card of Davis Mountains State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Official Texas State Parks Guide. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Texas State - Official Texas State Parks Guide

Official Texas State Parks Guide. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Official Texas State Parks Guide (español). Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Texas State - Guía de Parques

Official Texas State Parks Guide (español). Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Davis Mountains SP https://tpwd.texas.gov/state-parks/davis-mountains https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Davis_Mountains_State_Park Davis Mountains State Park is located in the Davis Mountains in Jeff Davis County, Texas. The closest town is Fort Davis, Texas. The park elevation is between 5,000 and 6,000 ft (1,500 and 1,800 m) above sea level. The park is next to the Fort Davis National Historic Site and the two are connected by four miles of hiking trails. Within the park is the "Indian Lodge", an adobe motel with thirty-nine rooms, sixteen that were built by the Civilian Conservation Corps during the 1930s (completed in 1939) and twenty-four added by Texas Parks and Wildlife in the 1967. A large bird blind next to the main road offers enclosed and open viewing areas for the many species of birds that are attracted to the feeders near the blind. The park has seven miles of equestrian trails in the special use Limpia Canyon Primitive Area, the section of the park north of Texas State Highway 118.
INTERPRETIVE GUIDE Javelina are a common sight in the Davis Mountains. RISING FROM THE GRASSLANDS OF THE CHIHUAHUAN DESERT, THE DAVIS MOUNTAINS ARE A SKY ISLAND – A MOUNTAIN OASIS SURROUNDED BY A VAST OCEAN OF DESERT BECKONING YOU TO EXPLORE ITS SECRETS. COOLER TEMPERATURES AND INCREASED RAINFALL OFFER PROTECTION AND ESCAPE FROM THE HOT DESERT LOWLANDS FOR PEOPLE AND WILDLIFE ALIKE. THE WORK OF THE CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS LAID THE FOUNDATION Davis Mountains State Park is a globally important birdwatching area and premier stargazing location. You can also enjoy hiking, mountain biking and day-use horseback-riding trails, camping and park ranger-led programs. McDonald Observatory and Fort Davis National Historic Site are nearby. We encourage you to tread lightly and help protect this unique and sensitive environment. • Keep Wildlife Wild – Please don’t feed or harass wildlife. • Trash Your Trash or Pack it Out – It’s ugly and can make wildlife sick. • Take Only Memories and Pictures – Leave all plants, wildlife, rocks and artifacts for future visitors to enjoy. • Be Safe – Bring water and proper footwear for hikes. Know where you are in case you need to call for help in an emergency. Many trail areas do not have cell phone coverage. • Stick to the Trails – Reduce impact and steer clear of things that can poke, prick, bite or sting you. • Protect Your Pets – Keep them on a leash no more than six feet in length and please pick up after them. • Be Kind to Other Visitors – Yield to visitors on horseback and watch for mountain bikers. • Protect Our Dark Skies – Home to some of the darkest skies in Texas, we recommend using minimal campsite lighting. Davis Mountains State Park TX-118 N, Park Road 3, Fort Davis, TX 79734 (432) 426-3337 • www.tpwd.texas.gov/davismountains Indian Lodge 16453 Park Road 3, Fort Davis, TX 79734 (432) 426-3254 • www.tpwd.texas.gov/indianlodge Follow us on Facebook and Instagram! FOR THIS TEXAS TREASURE. © 2019 TPWD. PWD BR P4501-0004E (7/19) In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. DAVIS MOUNTAINS STATE PARK AND INDIAN LODGE M O U N T A I N S S T A T E P A R K A N D I N D I A N L O D G E CASSIE COX, TPWD D A V I S SKY ISLAND CONSERVATION The Davis Mountains are a placed of undeniable beauty. At a mile above sea level, the terrain, flora and fauna of this park differ from the surrounding Chihuahuan Desert below. Cottonwoods and willows border Limpia Creek in the northern portion of the park. Large Emory oaks and gray oaks line its tributary, Keesey Creek which runs through the campground. When flowing, both are precious Montezuma quail water resources for wildlife. Canyon treefrogs, black-tailed rattlesnakes, Montezuma quail, mule deer and an occasional mountain lion are 1935 CCC Camp set up while building the state park and lodge I ndian Lodge represents the pinnacle of CCC construction in the state of Texas. The original 16-room structure was considered an architectural masterpiece when completed in 1935, and it has nobly withstood the test of time. After carefully studying southwestern building design, architect Bill Caldwell settled on a style reminiscent of the sprawling pueblos of New Mexico, including a plaza-like exterior courtyard. Nestled snugly on a Davis Mountains hillside, Indian Lodge looks part of the landscape itself, and for good reason. Utilizing centuries-old adobe construction techniques, the men of CCC companies 879 and 881 molded earthen bricks from a mixture of water, straw and soil excavated on-site. They muscled tens of thousands of these 40-pound blocks into place to form 18-inch-thick walls rising as high as three stories. The lodge was finished with locally harvested, hand-sewn pine vigas and river cane latilla ceilings adding rustic charm to the historic lobby. Some of the cedar furniture, hand carved by CCC Company 1811 of Bastrop State Park in Central Texas, is still used today. Keesey Canyon Overlook in Davis Mountains State Park only a few of the animals that live here. Archeological evidence shows that at least as early as 10,000 years ago, Native Americans relied on the variety of pl
Davis Mountains #TxStateParks State Park #BetterOutside @texasparkswildlife /texasparksandwildlife TexasStateParks.org/App LEGEND BEWARE OF MOUNTAIN LIONS AND JAVELINAS. Please do not leave children or pets unattended. Secure all food in closed vehicles. Headquarters Keep Wildlife Wild: do not feed animals or hang birdfeeders at campsites. Sky line Dr 2.6 mile ive Trail s on ew ay State Parks Store rk vis pa Da e o at es t ort ily. t s u F da e th tin r. m. at on te . s il c Cen t 5 p d a en e tr itor rs a 3A t th Vis ito ad bu S vis o , R y NH to rk dar is ed Trail Pa un Dav clos Skyline Drive o b rt is Fo HS N Lodge Interpretive Center Restrooms Showers PARK ROAD PH3 3A Primitive Sites Office/Store Water Only Sites Water and Electric Sites PARK ROAD 3A yl Sk in Full Hookup Sites rive eD .34 mil Indian Lodge es Dump Station Equestrian Trail Day Use Only il T ra il ail Access Tr 3 Primitve Equestrian Camping te zu m a Q Wildlife Viewing Area iles .33 m Trail uarters Headq Hiking Trail on PH2 ua PARK ROAD M To Fort Access Trail @TPWDparks 1.6 miles one-way To Fort Davis, Marfa and Balmorhea re C .58 m ek PH1 118 5000 TEXAS Gate Limpia Creek Limpia Creek Well (non-potable water) Primitive Equestrian Camping Area Seep Trail 1.25 miles s mile ek Cre pia Lim Trail 5400 560 Texas State Parks Store 1. T-shirts, caps and one-of-a-kind gift items are available at the Texas State Parks Store located in the Indian Lodge Gift Shop. d al on ory cD at ) M erv iles To bs 3 m O (1 Ke es ey Old CCC Trail one-w 3 miles 2.5 0 ay Primitive Camping Area 1.5 miles one-way Sheep Pen Canyon Loop 5.6 mile Well (non-potable water) TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. © 2019 TPWD PWD MP P4501-004D (2/19) Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. N Biking Trail iles 1.37 miles Indian Lo dge Trai Picnic Area l Group Picnic PLEASE NOTE • CHECK OUT time is 12 p.m. or renew permit by 9 a.m. (pending site availability). • Public consumption or display of any alcoholic beverage is prohibited. • A maximum of eight people permitted per campsite. Guests must leave the park by 10 p.m. Quiet time is from 10 p.m. – 6 a.m. • Pets must be kept on leash. Please pick up after them. • Equine must have proof of a negative EIA (Coggins) test within the past 12 months. The form VS 10-11 is proof of testing. • Gathering of firewood is prohibited. Campfires are permitted only in fire rings provided at each site, unless park is under a burn ban. Call park for detailed information regarding burn bans. • Overnight camping permitted only in designated primitive camping areas. Do not rearrange the landscape with rock ramparts or windbreaks. • A maximum of four people permitted per primitive campsite. • Never cut branches, saplings or trees. • Campfires are not permitted in the primitive area. COOK ONLY ON CONTAINERIZED FUEL STOVES. • BRING OUT WHAT YOU PACK IN. • It is an offense to deposit wastewater, sewer or graywater on the ground. PARK RESERVATIONS TexasStateParks.org ParquesDeTexas.org (512) 389-8900 Parking Amphitheater Wildlife Viewing Wheelchair Accessible Scenic Overlook PH Park Host Residence Maintenance P.O. Box 1707 TX Hwy. 118 N., Park Road 3 Fort Davis, TX 79734 (432) 426-3337 Proud Sponsor of Texas State Parks
Davis Mountains State Park Trails Map Texas Hwy 118 N. Park Rd. 3 Fort Davis, TX 79734 (432) 426-3337 www.texasstateparks.org LEGEND Headquarters Interpretive Center Restrooms Parking Primitive Campsites Campsites with Water & Electric Equestrian Campsites Campsites with Water Mountain Biking Trail Hiking Trail Horse Trail Rock Water Tank Scenic Overlook Picnic Sites Amphitheater Playground Dump Station NOTES: Biking trails are designated at trailhead. Contour intervals are 20 feet. Trail lengths are in miles. Elevation levels are in feet. No claims are made to the accuracy of the data or to the suitability of the data to a particular use. Map compiled by Texas State Parks staff. In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. © 2019 Texas Parks and Wildlife Department PWD MP P4501-0004F (7/19) Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. POINTS OF INTEREST (GPS coordinates shown in degrees, minutes, seconds) 1 SKYLINE DRIVE 30° 35’ 45.2” N 103° 55’ 49.0” W Paved switchbacks take you to historic stone structures as well as incredible views during day hikes or evening stargazing. 4 KEESEY CANYON OVERLOOK 30° 35’ 30.3” N 103° 55’ 39.2” W Enjoy picturesque views from this high point on the Skyline Drive Trail. 7 EMORY OAK WILDLIFE VIEWING AREA 30° 35’ 46.3” N 103° 56’ 05.3” W "Fanciest little bird blind in Texas." Enclosed building with view of a water feature and bird feeders. 2 THE KING'S TABLE 30° 35’ 59.3” N 103° 54’ 21.9” W Find the unobtrusive stone stairway down to a hidden picnic site with spectacular views. 5 INTERPRETIVE CENTER 30° 35’ 44.1“ N 103° 55’ 49.4” W Don’t miss the exhibits, wildlife viewing area and pollinator garden! 8 HEADQUARTERS TRAIL 30° 35’ 57.2” N 103° 55’ 46.8” W Easy walk to a wildlife viewing area, with a taste of park flora and views. 3 TRAILHEAD TO FORT DAVIS NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 30° 36’ 00.6” N 103° 54’ 19.8” W A short walk from the CCC Overlook. The fort is a 1-mile hike from the state park boundary. 6 INDIAN LODGE 30° 35’ 33.1” N 103° 56’ 36.6” W This beautiful white adobe lodge is a part of the CCC's legacy in Texas. 9 LIMPIA CREEK VISTA 30° 36’ 25.3” N 103° 55’ 16.4” W The park’s highest point, and reward for a 700-ft. ascent. Cameras are a must. TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. Davis Mountains State Park Explore trails that range from high adventure to peaceful stroll. Whether you’re a mountain biker, equestrian, hiker or trail runner, Davis Mountains State Park offers what your heart desires. Scenic vistas and abundant wildlife are around every corner. Breathe in the mountain air and experience the same sensation that the young men of the CCC did. They built this park in the 1930s to be enjoyed for generations to come. Javelina FOR EMERGENCIES, PLEASE CALL 9-1-1. TRAIL DIST TIME HEADQUARTERS TRAIL 0.3 mi one-way 10-15 min. Easy Take an easy scenic walk with views of Keesey Canyon below and a 35-million-year-old lava flow above, ending at the Emory Oak Wildlife Viewing Area. MONTEZUMA QUAIL TRAIL 0.9 mi one-way 1 hr. Moderate From the wildlife viewing area, quickly climb 220 ft. for canyon and Indian Lodge views. Walk a short ridge and finish with a sharp descent to the campground. INDIAN LODGE TRAIL 1.5 mi one-way 1.5 hrs. Challenging Begin behind Indian Lodge, ascending to stunning views of the Davis Mountains. End by taking the short stretch of the Montezuma Quail Trail to the campground, or the longer stretch to headquarters. SKYLINE DRIVE TRAIL 2.6 mi one way 2 hrs. Moderate From the Interpretive Center, ascend 544 ft. to Keesey Canyon Overlook. Follow Skyline Drive to see historic buildings and views of Fort Davis and local landmarks. End at the CCC trailhead. LIMPIA CREEK TRAIL 2.5 mi one-way 2 hrs. Moderate From the parking lot follow an easy flat trail through Limpia Canyon, then slowly climb 550 ft. to Sheep Pen Canyon Loop junction, enjoying amazing views of the Davis Mountains. SHEEP PEN CANYON LOOP 5.6 mi 3-4 hrs. Moderate Traverse a mountain plateau through oak-juniper forests, high desert grasslands and some of the park’s best views! Find a well and trail spurs to primitive camping and Limpia Creek Vista. OLD CCC TRAIL 1.6 mi one-way
TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE BIRDS OF DAVIS MOUNTAINS S TAT E PA R K A N D V I C I N I T Y A FIELD CHECKLIST 2016 INTRODUCTION L ying within the northern portion of the vast Chihuahuan biotic province, Jeff Davis County is located in the heart of the TransPecos region of far west Texas. The county comprises 2,258 square miles and varies in elevation from approximately 3,800 feet to 8,378 feet above sea level. About 3,000 residents inhabit Jeff Davis County which is predominately ranching country and includes only two towns – Valentine and Fort Davis, the county seat. The most prominent geographical feature, the Davis Mountains, are characterized by rugged mesas, jagged escarpments, and sharp peaks in the highlands that are interspersed with gentle, rolling hills. Formed by a burst of intrusive and extrusive volcanic activity approximately 35 million years ago during the Miocene, the Davis Mountains today represent the largest and highest mountain range entirely within the state of Texas; over 600 square miles of the range are at elevations over 5,000 feet. The highest paved road in Texas terminates on top of Mount Locke at the McDonald Observatory at an elevation of 6,791 feet. Jeff Davis County supports a diversity of habitat types due in large measure to the variance in elevation. Grasslands composed of mixed-grass or short-grass communities occur in the basin flats surrounding the mountains as well as on plateaus and rolling hills and are best developed up to 5,200 ft elevation. Blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis) and sideoats grama (B. curtipendula) are dominant although many other species occur, including bluestems (Bothriochloa spp.), three-awns (Aristida spp.), tobosa (Hilaria mutica), and muhlys (Muhlenbergia spp.). Chihuahuan desert scrub, typical of the lowland desert, has invaded certain grassland areas where lack of fire, soil erosion and periodic droughts have allowed the encroachment of desert plants. Creosotebush (Larrea tridentata), honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa), catclaw mimosa (Mimosa aculeatacarpa var. biuncifera), and other shrubs are common in these areas. Grassland habitats and their associated birdlife are best observed from US 90, TX 17, TX 118, TX 166, and RR 505 generally south and west of Fort Davis. 1 Elements of pinyon-juniper-oak woodlands are found generally between 4,400 – 5,500 feet elevation where gray oak (Quercus grisea), Emory oak (Q. emoryi), and rose-fruited juniper (Juniperus coahuilensis) are dominant. At elevations above 5,500 feet, Mexican pinyon pine (Pinus cembroides) is found, alligator juniper (J. deppeana) begins to replace the other junipers, and silverleaf oak (Q. hypoleucoides) appears as a co-dominant. Chisos red oak (Q. gravesii), chinkapin oak (Q. muhlenbergii), bigtooth maple (Acer grandidentatum) and Texas madrone (Arbutus xalapensis) occur in moist canyons and on protected slopes. At still higher elevations, generally above 6,000 feet, a montane woodland of pines and scattered oaks is found, skirted by an understory of grasses. Dominant trees in this woodland are ponderosa pine (P. ponderosa), southwestern white pine (P. strobiformis), and Gambel’s oak (Q. gambelii). Occasional stands of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) are also present. The scenic loop drive through the Davis Mountains (TX 17, TX 118, and TX 166) traverses portions of both the pinyon-juniper-oak and pine-oak communities. Streams, marshes (ciénegas), and earthen stock tanks dot the landscape and provide a variety of aquatic and wetland habitats, offering much-needed water, shelter, and food resources for wildlife. Riparian vegetation occurring in these areas includes Rio Grande cottonwood (P. deltoides ssp. wislizenii), Goodding willow (Salix gooddingii), yewleaf willow (Salix taxifolia), little walnut (Juglans microcarpa), netleaf hackberry (Celtis reticulata), desert willow (Chilopsis linearis), velvet ash (Fraxinus velutina), seepwillow baccharis (Baccharis salicifolia), and cattails (Typha sp.). Well developed cottonwood/ash/willow gallery woodlands occur in some locations along permanent watercourses, such as portions of Limpia and Musquiz creeks, although in other settings riparian vegetation forms low, dense thickets. Davis Mountains State Park is situated in the transition zone between extensive grassland communities that encircle the Davis Mountains and the lower extension of the oak-juniper-pinyon woodlands, which 2 dominate intermediate elevations of the mountains (altitudes in the park range from 4,900 to 5,675 feet). Emory oak woodlands occur along Keesy Creek and its canyon, while junipers and oaks occur intermixed with numerous shrubs, grasses, forbes, and succulents such as yucca and agave on slopes and at higher elevations in the park. Cottonwood and willow are common components of the riparian vegetation bordering Limpia Creek. The avifauna of the park is composed of species characteristic of grasslands, woodlands and riparian areas. Most of the birds
T E X A S S T A T E P A R K S Davis Mountains S TAT E PA R K B I G B E N D C O U N T RY Davis Mountains STATE PARK Davis Mountains State Park blends the best Texas has to offer — scenic moun­tains, picturesque campsites, superb birdwatching, beautiful trails and a historic full-service hotel. Try your luck at spotting the rare Montezuma quail in the morning and climb a rocky mountain slope in the evening. Enjoy a shady campsite or relax in a quaint room at Indian Lodge, built in 1933 by the Civilian Conservation Corps. One visit to Davis Mountains is sure to lead to more! Camping: Campsites with water only or water and electricity plus tent pads or full hookups (some with shade shelters) and cable TV. Also primitive camping sites. Group Facility: Group picnic area under the oaks. Picnicking: Picnic tables and grills. Interpretive Center: New exhibits and bird viewing area. Trails: Over 12 miles of hiking trails, including a 4-mile trail that leads to Fort Davis National Historic Site. Also, mountain bike and equestrian trails. Special Feature: Skyline Drive winds to some of the park’s highest ridges and provides a breath-taking view of the park and Davis Mountains. 118 P3 Davis Mountains State Park 166 Fort Davis 118 17 Located in Jeff Davis County, one mile north of Fort Davis on Texas 17, then three miles west on Texas 118N to Park Road 3. Davis Mountains State Park P.O. Box 1707, Fort Davis, TX 79734 • (432) 426-3337 www.texasstateparks.org Rates and reservations: (512) 389-8900. For info only: (800) 792-1112. © 2015 TPWD PWD CD P4501-004C (8/15) In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041.
-Official- FA C I L I T I E S MAPS Get the Mobile App: ACTIVITIES texasstateparks.org/app Toyota Tundra Let your sense of adventure be your guide with the Toyota Official Vehicle of the Texas Parks & Wildlife Foundation Tundra — built to help you explore all that the great state of Texas has to offer. | toyota.com/trucks BUILT HERE. LIVES HERE. ASSEMBLED IN TEXAS WITH U.S. AND GLOBALLY SOURCED PARTS. Contents 4 6 8 10 Activities and Programs Parks Near You Places to Stay Recreational Vehicles 12 Tips for Time in Nature Ray Roberts Devils River 14 Visitor Fees and Passes Directory TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT 18 Big Bend Country 26 34 48 56 64 80 86 Gulf Coast TPW COMMISSION S. Reed Morian, Chairman Houston Arch “Beaver” Aplin, III, Vice-Chairman Lake Jackson James E. Abell Kilgore Oliver J. Bell Cleveland Anna B. Galo Laredo Jeffery D. Hildebrand Houston Jeanne W. Latimer San Antonio Robert L. “Bobby” Patton, Jr. Fort Worth Dick Scott Wimberley T. Dan Friedkin, Chairman-Emeritus Houston Lee Marshall Bass, Chairman-Emeritus Fort Worth Hill Country Panhandle Plains Pineywoods Prairies and Lakes South Texas Plains Carter P. Smith Executive Director Rodney Franklin State Parks Director Josh Havens Communications Director Facilities and Activities Index 44 State Parks Map Special thanks to Toyota and advertisers, whose generous support made this guide possible. Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Cover photo: Tyler State Park, Chase Fountain Texas State Parks Official Guide, Seventeenth Edition © TPWD PWD BK P4000-000A (5/20) TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. WELCOME from Rodney Franklin, State Parks Director   Texas contains some of the most diverse public lands in the country. There is a wealth of cultural heritage. Wildlife abounds, landscapes flourish with beauty and our history is abundant. Your state parks are a part of the legacy that makes Texas proud. The people of Texas recently helped secure that legacy for future generations by voting yes to Proposition 5. Thank you! These 630,000-plus acres showcase some of our state’s greatest treasures. Parks help people make memories with family and find respite in nature’s playground. They strengthen local economies and bind communities. Most of all, parks enable each of us to spend time outside to recharge, be healthy and relax in our own way. I invite you to enjoy your state parks, exploring the best of Texas with friends and family. The parks are here for you. They belong to you. Please visit, have fun, and help protect them forever! Thank you, Texas! Texans voted to approve passage of Proposition 5 in the November 5, 2019 election. Now 100% of the sporting goods sales tax will go to fund the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and Texas Historical Commission. This funding will help secure the future of local parks, state parks and historic sites for generations to come, all without increasing taxes. We would like to extend our deepest gratitude. See what’s in store for Texas State Parks: texasstateparks.org/better ACTIVITIES & PROGRAMS What is there to do in state parks? Enjoy a family picnic, tour a hallowed historic site or choose from some of these visitor favorites: Bike Pedal across parks at any speed, in any style, with any group. Choose the routes, surfaces and distances that fit your comfort zone. Walk Start with a shorter loop, tackle tougher terrain or join a guided tour. Fish Fish without a license in as many as 70 state parks. Many offer tackle loaner programs and special learnto-fish events. Boat or Paddle Rent canoes and kayaks, explore a Texas Paddling Trail or launch a boat. View Wildlife Discover the birds, mammals and plants that live in Texas. Many parks have signage and checklists to help you learn more about the wildlife around you. 4 Camp Swim Find a site that meets your needs. Test out new recipes, share your favorite stories and enjoy the stars. Beat the heat at creeks, rivers, lakes, springs, pools and ocean beaches. More information & reservations: texasstateparks.org (512) 389-8900 Many state parks offer special guided and self-guided progra
Guía de Parques INSTALACIONES Descarga la Aplicacíon Móvil MAPAS ACTIVIDADES texasstateparks.org/app ¡Los niños entran gratis! La entrada es gratis para los niños de 12 años y menores. Encuentra un parque: parquesdetexas.org Contenido Estero Llano Grande SP 2 4 6 8 9 10 18 Actividades y Programas Parques Cercanos Lugares para Quedarse Tarifas y Pases Directorio Mapa de Parques Instalaciones y Actividades BIENVENIDO Rodney Franklin, Director de Parques Texas tiene algunas de las tierras públicas más diversas del país, con una gran riqueza natural y cultural. La vida silvestre está por todas partes, los paisajes florecen con belleza, y la historia es abundante. Sus parques estatales son parte del legado que nos enorgullece. La gente de Texas ayuda a asegurar ese legado para las generaciones futuras al visitar y ser voluntarios. ¡Gracias! Estos más de 630,000 acres exhiben algunos de los grandes tesoros del estado. Los parques nos ayudan a crear recuerdos con la familia y a encontrar consuelo en la naturaleza. Los parques fortalecen las economías locales y unen a las comunidades. Sobre todo, los parques nos permiten pasar tiempo al aire libre para recargar energías, estar saludables y relajarnos a nuestra manera. Les invito a disfrutar de sus parques estatales, explorando lo mejor de Texas con amigos y familia. Los parques están aquí para todos. Nos pertenecen a todos. ¡Visítelos, diviértase y ayude a protegerlos para siempre! Foto de portada: Estero Llano State Park, Chase Fountain © 2021 TPWD PWD BK P4000-000A (5/21) TPWD recibe fondos del Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU. (USFWS por sus siglas en ingles). TPWD prohíbe la discriminación por raza, color, religión, nacionalidad de origen, discapacidad, edad y género, conforme la ley estatal y federal. Para solicitar un acomodo especial u obtener información en un formato alternativo, por favor contacte a TPWD en un Teléfono de Texto (TTY) al (512) 3898915 ó por medio de “Relay Texas” al 7-1-1 ó (800) 735-2989 ó por email a accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. Si usted cree que TPWD ha discriminado en su contra, favor de comunicarse con TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, o con el Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU., Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. De acuerdo con la Ley de Depósito del Estado de Texas, esta publicación está disponible en el centro de Distribución de Publicaciones del Estado de Texas y/o las Bibliotecas de Depósito de Texas. ACTIVIDADES Y PROGRAMAS ¿Qué puedo hacer en los parques estatales? ¡Disfruta de un día de campo, visita un sitio histórico o elige entre muchas otras opciones! Bicicletas Pedalea a lo largo de los parques a cualquier velocidad, en cualquier estilo, con cualquier grupo. Elige las rutas, el tipo de terreno y las distancias que cumplan con tu zona de confort. Caminatas Empieza con un circuito más corto, avanza a terrenos más difíciles o únete a una caminata guiada. Pescar Puedes pescar sin licencia en tantos como 70 parques estatales. Muchos parques ofrecen equipo para pescar a manera de préstamo y eventos especiales para aprender a pescar. Barcos Renta canoas y kayacs y explora uno de los senderos acuáticos en Texas. Nadar Animales Silvestres Acampar Descubre aves, mamíferos y plantas que tienen su hogar en Texas. Muchos parques tienen señalamientos y listados que te ayudan a aprender más. Encuentra un lugar que cumpla con lo que quieres. Prueba nuevas recetas, comparte historias favoritas y disfruta de las estrellas. 2 Más información y reservaciones: parquesdetexas.org Escape del calor en arroyos, ríos, lagos, manantiales, piletas y playas del mar. Tu seguridad en el agua es muy importante. Lleva el chaleco salvavidas. Aprende a nadar. Guarda a los niños. (512) 389-8900 ¡Pregunta en tu parque cuáles están disponibles! Los niños de 12 años y menores entran GRATIS Cielos Estrellados Escapa de las luces de la ciudad y goza de maravillosas vistas del cielo que no encontrarás en ninguna otra parte. Ven a una fiesta de estrellas o toma una excursión de constelaciones auto-guiada. Familias en la Naturaleza Elige un taller o diseña tu propia aventura. ¡Monta una tienda de campaña, cocina al exterior, prende una fogata y juega al exterior! Nosotros te Toma una publicación gratuita de actividades o pregunta por los paquetes gratuitos con los parques proporcionamos todo el equipo. No es necesario tener experiencia. participantes. Usa los binoculares, lupas, libros de bosquejos y libros de guías para explorar el parque. Mochilas para Exploradores Soldados Búfalo de Texas Descubre la historia con cuentos, vestuarios y herramientas. Sigue la pista de un animal, pesca con caña, cocina sobre una fogata, visita los fuertes y más. Adéntrate en las historias de vida de aquellos que sirvieron valientemente en los primeros regimientos Áfrico-Americanos de las Fuerzas Armadas. ! Seguridad en el Parque Ten cuidado con el agua Pr

also available

National Parks
USFS NW