Devils River

State Natural Area - Texas

Devils River State Natural Area part of three ecosystems, the Edwards Plateau, the Tamaulipan mezquital and the Chihuahuan Desert. It is located 66 miles (106 km) north of Del Rio, Val Verde County in the U.S. state of Texas. Dolan Falls in the natural area is the highest volume waterfall in Texas. The area was once home to the Comanche, Kiowa and Kickapoo tribes. Pictographs painted with red panthers are found in the area's fifty-three rock shelters, which archeologists have dated to 3000 b.c. The area is home to many varieties of flora and fauna, including the Mexican free-tailed bat as well as live oak, pecan and sycamore trees.

maps

Trails Map of Devils River State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Devils River - Trails Map

Trails Map of Devils River State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

brochures

Trails Map of the Del Norte Unit of Devils River State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Devils River - Trails Map

Trails Map of the Del Norte Unit of Devils River State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Park Map of the Del Norte Unit of Devils River State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Devils River - Park Map

Park Map of the Del Norte Unit of Devils River State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Paddler Map of Devils River State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Devils River - Paddler Map

Paddler Map of Devils River State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Birds of the Edwards Plateau at Devils River State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Devils River - Birds Edwards Plateau

Birds of the Edwards Plateau at Devils River State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Birds of the Trans-Pecos at Devils River State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Devils River - Birds Trans-Pecos

Birds of the Trans-Pecos at Devils River State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Fishes of Devils River State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Devils River - Fishes

Fishes of Devils River State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Rack Card of Devils River State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Devils River - Rack Card

Rack Card of Devils River State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Official Texas State Parks Guide. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Texas State - Official Texas State Parks Guide

Official Texas State Parks Guide. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Official Texas State Parks Guide (español). Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Texas State - Guía de Parques

Official Texas State Parks Guide (español). Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Devils River SNA https://tpwd.texas.gov/state-parks/devils-river https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devils_River_State_Natural_Area Devils River State Natural Area part of three ecosystems, the Edwards Plateau, the Tamaulipan mezquital and the Chihuahuan Desert. It is located 66 miles (106 km) north of Del Rio, Val Verde County in the U.S. state of Texas. Dolan Falls in the natural area is the highest volume waterfall in Texas. The area was once home to the Comanche, Kiowa and Kickapoo tribes. Pictographs painted with red panthers are found in the area's fifty-three rock shelters, which archeologists have dated to 3000 b.c. The area is home to many varieties of flora and fauna, including the Mexican free-tailed bat as well as live oak, pecan and sycamore trees.
Devils River State Natural Area Del Norte Unit Trails Map 21715 Dolan Creek Road Del Rio, TX 78840 (830) 395-2133 www.texasstateparks.org LEGEND Headquarters Group Barracks Maintenance Area Parking Restrooms Showers Composting Toilet Hiking Trails Primitive Campsites Swimming Birdwatching Blind POINTS OF INTEREST (GPS coordinates shown in degrees, minutes, seconds) Trails are hiking and biking. Contour intervals are 10 feet. Trail lengths are in miles. Elevation levels are in feet. 1 VISITOR CENTER AND INTERPRETIVE EXHIBITS 29° 56' 27.78" N 100° 58' 16.68" W Check-in for registration and orientation. View the interpretive exhibits about the Natural Area's resources. 2 NEWTON PENS PICNIC AREA 29° 55' 4.58" N 100° 59' 8.12" W A picnic area near historic ranching structures. 3 NEWTON BIRDING BLINDS 29° 55' 2.63" N 100° 59' 10.33" W Two birding blinds are located on the Newton Loop, a great place to see the Natural Area's feathery friends. 4 12-MILE LOOP TRAILHEAD ACCESS POINTS Northeast access: 29° 56' 29.36" N 100° 55' 41.07" W Southwest access: 29° 54' 25.82" N 100° 59' 34.94" W Two trailhead access points with adjacent parking areas. 5 RIVER GATE ACCESS PARKING AREA 29° 54' 14.33" N 100° 59' 39.52" W Park here to hike down to Devils River. One-mile hike. 6 DEVILS RIVER OAK TREE 29° 53' 49.9" N 100° 59' 47.59" W This oak tree on the cliff edge provides habitat to our wildlife. 7 FINEGAN SPRINGS 29° 53' 60.00" N 100° 59' 53.86" W Finegan Springs, named for a previous property owner, has an impressive supply of 12,000-22,000 gallons per minute, feeding Devils River. 8 WINDMILL 29° 54' 45.241" N 100° 58' 7.841" W This windmill is reminiscent of the Natural Area's ranching heritage. A good trail reference point at approximately 2.2 miles from the junction with Devils River road and 3.8 miles from the 12-mile loop trail parking area. No claims are made to the accuracy of the data or to the suitability of the data to a particular use. Map compiled by Texas State Parks staff. In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. © 2019 Texas Parks and Wildlife Department PWD MP P4501-0151M (7/19) Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. Devils River State Natural Area - Del Norte Unit Explore a hidden oasis and peaceful retreat. Three ecoregions collide at Devils River State Natural Area, making it home to the beautiful tropical parula and Devils River minnow. Hike to Devils River to see Finegan Springs, one of many that supplies the river its crystal-clear waters. Enjoy hiking trails, bird-watching and savor the solitude. People have appreciated these resources for thousands of years and we hope you do, too. TRAIL DISTANCE DIFFICULTY DESCRIPTION NEWTON LOOP 0.12 mi. Easy Cactus wrens serenade as you hike down a native plant pathway. View birds from our two blinds. The Newton family once ranched in this area. You can see the historic ranching structures all around. 12-MILE LOOP 12.4 mi. Difficult Enjoy spectacular landscape views and encounter historic structures left by the Fawcett family who once ranched this land. DEVILS RIVER TRAIL 0.94 mi. Moderate View the spectacular canyon walls, plant life and wildlife habitat on your hike down to the river. FINEGAN SPRINGS TRAIL 1.0 mi. Moderate Hike along the river through some water crossings to Finegan Springs. Tread lightly. This area is home to lots of wildlife, and birdwatching is great as you hike along to some larger trees near the end of the trail. STAYING SAFE KNOW YOUR LIMITS. Prepare for sun and heat. Wear sunscreen, insect repellent and appropriate clothing/hiking shoes. DRINK PLENTY OF WATER. Your body quickly loses fluids when you’re on the trail. Bring a quart of water per hour of activity. TELL OTHERS WHERE YOU’LL BE. If possible, avoid exploring alone. Tell someone where you are going and when you plan to return. WEATHER CHANGES QUICKLY. Check forecasts before you leave and prepare for changes in the weather. YOU MAY NOT BE ABLE TO CONNECT. It’s a good idea to take along a cell phone and GPS unit, but don’t count on them. FAMILY FRIENDLY FUN. Public consumption or display of alcoholic beverages is prohibited and NO gl
Devils River #TxStateParks State Natural Area #BetterOutside /texasparksandwildlife @texasparkswildlife @TPWDparks TexasStateParks.org/App B Park LEGEND ound ary N 7 Headquarters Restrooms lo 12 mile op Composting Toilet Campsites #5-7 PLEASE NOTE 6 No paved roads. 22 miles of gravel road into park. Roads subject to closure due to flooding. No trash service. Pack it in. Pack it out. SPEED LIMIT 15 5 Park Boundary To Hwy. 277 (22 miles) Dolan C re ek Ro ad an m ile ek C re o lo A Hike-in Sites Dolan Cre ek r Pa kB n ou ry da p 1 B kB 2 oun dar y 3 Dolan y ar 4 nd rk u Bo .9 miles to River Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. San Pedro Point Locked Gate D Park Boundary © 2019 TPWD PWD MP P4501-151B (2/19) Cre ek Pa TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. Primitive Campsites Group Barracks Hiking Trail Biking Trail Swimming Parking Maintenance Mileage Marker Hike and Bike Access Only Main Trail • Pets must be on a 6-foot leash at all times and not allowed in park buildings. Campsites #1-4 Par • Park closes at 10 p.m. Check out time is 2 p.m. • Protect our dark skies. Starting 2 hours after sunset, please use minimal lighting as needed to safely navigate within your campsite. 12 Do l • Overnight facilities, including fees, are made by reservation only. Reservation number above. Showers e s vil Riv er • Public consumption or display of any alcoholic beverage is prohibited. • No ground fires permitted. Gathering of firewood is prohibited. • Swim at your own risk. • Please review complete Park Rules and Regulations. PARK RESERVATIONS TexasStateParks.org ParquesDeTexas.org (512) 389-8901 21715 Dolan Creek Road Del Rio, TX 78840 (830) 395-2133 Proud Sponsor of Texas State Parks
Critical Paddler Information Things You Should Know Before Paddling the Devils River: Despite the beautiful setting, a trip down any stretch of the Devils River from SH 163 at Baker's Crossing to the Rough Canyon Marina at Lake Amistad can be difficult and challenging to plan, exhausting to navigate, and life-threatening if not prepared, even for the most seasoned paddlers. It is critical for paddlers to plan and prepare well in advance for a physically demanding, remote river trip, and to make arrangements for take-out with a private outfitter or private property owner if needed. A Devils River Access Permit is required if accessing any TPWD managed lands during a river trip. Designated public camping is presently allowed, with applicable reservations, at Baker’s Crossing, San Pedro Point – Del Norte (river mile 15), Mile 12 Paddler camp, Mile 20 Paddler camp, Mile 29 Paddler Camp – Dan A. Hughes; and at Amistad National Recreation Area. All other campsites along the river bank must be within the gradient boundary in order to avoid trespassing on adjacent private properties. Legal campsites within the gradient boundary are limited in number. All paddlers on the Devils River should familiarize themselves with gradient boundary determination and plan trip accordingly to ensure all campsites selected are legal. Camping on islands within the river, while legal, can be extremely dangerous if the river rises. Know the weather forecast prior to launch.                Do not attempt to paddle the Devils River unless you are an experienced paddler in good physical condition with wilderness paddling experience; are well prepared; and fully understand the river challenges, hazards, and river-use etiquette. The Devils River can flash-flood from rains that fall within its watershed from over 100 miles away and can become dangerous and life threatening, VERY QUICKLY. While the river water clarity and quality is excellent, take proper water treatment precautions before drinking. Carry abundant DRINKING WATER OR WATER TREATMENT CAPABILITY. MAINTAIN GOOD HYDRATION! Severe sunburn, dehydration and heat exhaustion are common hazards on the Devils River. Wide brimmed hats, long sleeve shirts, long pants, quality sunglasses and environmentally safe sunscreen provide needed protection from direct sunlight reflection and exposure in general. Strong headwinds are common and can be challenging even to the fit and experienced paddler. In the winter, cold fronts can cause temperatures to drop 40-plus degrees in minutes, prepare accordingly. Be aware that venomous insects and snakes may be encountered, along with numerous plants with spikes, thorns and spines. There are many obstacles in the river that can be dangerous if not navigated properly. This map notes the location of some of the common river hazards, however, others maybe encountered. Running Dolan falls is not recommended at any water level. Wear tough, closed-toe water shoes. Aqua socks or open sandals are not adequate. Carry a first-aid kit that contains items to treat serious injuries in an isolated environment, where rescue is likely hours away. Cell phones don’t work in the Devils River corridor. If you climb hills attempting to get cell service you will likely be trespassing on private property. For safety, consider satellite communications ... BUT BE PREPARED FOR A LONG WAIT!! If you are doing a one-day trip, plan at least for overnight, with food/water/emergency ration supply for an extra day or two. Packing light will make your trip more enjoyable. A common mistake is overloading boats with extra coolers carrying non-essentials. These coolers often spill their contents into the river. Secure all gear within your craft so that WHEN your canoe or kayak floods or is upside down in the river nothing will float away. River Etiquette:  Human waste negatively impacts environmental and water quality and is ultimately a hazard to the river ecosystem. Utilization of a WAG Bag (Waste Alleviation and Gelling Bag) to contain and remove human waste from the river corridor is a permit requirement.  Pick up litter, even if it is not yours. Strive to leave no visible evidence of human presence.  If camping at one of the TPWD managed sites, a camp reservation is required in addition to a permit.  Carry heavy-duty dry bags/containers for trash. Stow your trash bag inside your vessel so that it will not get ripped, snagged, or cut, causing you to lose your trash into the river. Plastic bags alone do not make adequate trash bags.  No glass. Broken glass creates a serious health hazard.  Noise travels a long way on water. Please respect others and enjoy the sounds of nature.  Be prepared to take care of yourself and do not become someone else’s problem. Rescue could be days away! Expect to pay for emergency extraction.  RESPECT PRIVATE PROPERTY – DO NOT TRESPASS!  Secure food items and trash from critters at night. Raccoons are common and can get into many rec
TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE BIRDS of the EDWA RDS P L AT E A U a field checklist BY MARK W. LOCKWOOD THIRD EDITION • 2008 Counties included in the coverage area of this checklist. Portion of counties that are not part of the Edwards Plateau (shaded area) are not covered. Cover: (clock-wise) Illustration of Golden-cheeked Warbler by Clemente Guzman III, Black-capped Vireo by Rob Fleming and Hooded Oriole by Clemente Guzman III. Birds of the Edwards Plateau: a field checklist the edwards plateau The Edwards Plateau is also known as the Texas Hill Country. It is an extensive plateau covering much of central and west-central Texas. It occupies over 36,000 square miles, roughly 17% of the state. The Hill Country is best known for two rare songbirds, the Golden-cheeked Warbler and Black-capped Vireo. However, these are just two of the many species that can be found in the region. This checklist includes all or part of 26 counties stretching from Travis in the east to Crockett in the west (see map). The Lampasas Cut Plains and the extreme northwest­ ern portion of the Live Oak-Mesquite Savanna, which includes portions of the Concho Valley, are not included in this checklist. The Edwards Plateau is the southernmost extension of the Great Plains. It is formed by Cretaceous limestone and slopes from northwest to southeast. The Balcones Escarpment forms the southern and eastern boundary of the region. The western boundary is marked by the Pecos River and the Rolling Plains border the plateau to the north. There are several distinct habitat types found on the plateau. The region bordering the Balcones Escarpment is dominated by Ashe Juniper (Juniperus ashei)–oak wood­ lands, a habitat unique to the Edwards Plateau and a few nearby areas. This habitat is most associated with the Hill Country. Riparian woodlands are found following the many streams and rivers that meander across the plateau. These forests provide habitat to a distinctly different group of birds. Open grasslands and shrublands can be found throughout the region, but these habitats are most characteristic of the northern and western parts of the plateau. edwards plateau birds The central location of the plateau is one of the reasons so many species of birds can be found there. The avifauna of the Edwards Plateau includes a mix of species from the surrounding ecological regions of the state. A total of 431 species are included in this checklist. The avifauna of the western plateau is influenced by the arid habitats found farther west. Cactus Wren, Black-throated Sparrow, and Pyrrhuloxia are often associated with desert habitats, but are also found on the plateau. Some of the South­ western specialties also reach the western plateau, such as Zone-tailed Hawk, Gray Vireo, Varied Bunting, and Scott’s Oriole. The riparian corridors of the region provide habitat to many species that more common farther east, such as Barred Owl, Acadian Flycatcher, Red-eyed Vireo, and Northern Parula. Several species primarily found in South Texas can be found along the southern edge of the plateau. Green Kingfisher, Long-billed Thrasher and Olive Sparrow are probably the most common of these birds. This checklist was compiled by Mark W. Lockwood of Alpine, Texas. Nomenclature and organization are based upon the A.O.U. Check-list of North American Birds (7th Edition) as supplemented. 1 Please help us protect the natural avian communities in state parks by refraining from using playback tapes of bird songs. Frequent use of these tapes disrupts normal avian activity patterns, including essential territorial behavior, and may lead to nest failure. Thank you for your cooperation. LEGEND Abundance abundant – normally present and easy to find in proper habitat, often in large numbers common – normally present, and should be found, in proper habitat uncommon – normally present, but can be missed, in proper habitat in small numbers rare – not expected, annual although occurring only a few times per year  very rare – occurs at irregular intervals, but not on an annual basis  lingering individuals   accidental – average of one or two records every ten years Geographic occurrence/Status R Texas Bird Records Committee review species E Eastern half of the Edwards Plateau W Western half of the Edwards Plateau S Southern portion of the Edwards Plateau, generally referring to the Balcones Canyonlands subregion SW Southwestern portion of the Edwards Plateau, Val Verde and Kinney counties in particular NW Northwestern portion of the Edwards Plateau, Crockett, Schleicher and Sutton counties in particular NE Northeastern portion of the Edwards Plateau Nesting status N regular and widespread breeding species N* regular breeding species, but has a more local distribution N** very rare as a breeding species, often only one record N? status as a breeding species is uncertain CITATION Lockwood, M. W. 2008. Birds of the Edwards Plateau: a field checklist. Natural Resource
TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE BIRDS of the TR A NS-PECOS a field checklist Black-throated Sparrow by Kelly B. Bryan Birds of the Trans-Pecos: a field checklist the chihuahuan desert Traditionally thought of as a treeless desert wasteland, a land of nothing more than cacti, tumbleweeds, jackrabbits and rattlesnakes – West Texas is far from it. The Chihuahuan Desert region of the state, better known as the Trans-Pecos of Texas (Fig. 1), is arguably the most diverse region in Texas. A variety of habitats ranging from, but not limited to, sanddunes, desert-scrub, arid canyons, oak-juniper woodlands, lush riparian woodlands, plateau grasslands, cienegas (desert springs), pinyon-juniper woodlands, pine-oak woodlands and montane evergreen forests contribute to a diverse and complex avifauna. As much as any other factor, elevation influences and dictates habitat and thus, bird occurrence. Elevations range from the highest point in Texas at 8,749 ft. (Guadalupe Peak) to under 1,000 ft. (below Del Rio). Amazingly, 106 peaks in the region are over 7,000 ft. in elevation; 20 are over 8,000 ft. high. These montane islands contain some of the most unique components of Texas’ avifauna. As a rule, human population in the region is relatively low and habitat quality remains good to excellent; habitat types that have been altered the most in modern times include riparian corridors and cienegas. Figure 1: Coverage area is indicated by the shaded area. This checklist covers all of the area west of the Pecos River and a corridor to the east of the Pecos River that contains areas of Chihuahuan Desert habitat types. There is overlap in coverage of other regional checklists, specifically in Val Verde and Crockett counties (Birds of the Edwards Plateau by Lockwood) and in Ector, Upton and Reagan counties (Birds of the High Plains and Rolling Plains by Sieffert). 1 Also influenced by elevation, the region’s climatic patterns read like a farmer’s almanac for an entire state. Normally, one rainy season occurs here on an annual basis, associated with the onset of the southwestern monsoon pattern that usually begins in July and ends in September. Winter seasons can be mild except at the higher elevations. Spring seasons are usually dry and windy; and landscapes dominated by the brown and yellow colors of dormant grasses typically reflect that. Although not a wasteland, areas of low desert-scrub, especially along the Rio Grande can be inhospitable at times; 100°+ temperatures can begin as early as February and persist as late as November. Rainfall for these areas usually averages less than 6 inches annually, while the eastern portions of the region and the highest elevations can receive more than 20 inches. Summer seasons in the higher elevations are usually cool to warm at best and generally wet in contrast to the lower desert and much of the rest of Texas. Although portions of the Chihuahuan Desert ecoregion extend north into southern New Mexico and southeastern Arizona, the major part of the region is found south of the border with Mexico. In fact, 65% of the physiographic area is in Mexico. Overall, the ecoregion covers 243,000 square miles. Still, the portion that occurs in Texas is large, covering approximately 50,000 square miles, or about one-fifth of the landmass of Texas. Most of the region remains privately owned, yet more public lands exist here than in any other region of the state. From a conservation (and birding) point of view several national parks (comprising ~956,208 acres) and numerous state holdings (~533,250 acres) provide access to many significant areas within the region. Many of these locations have well-developed bird lists with defined seasonal occurrence. There are several other publications that characterize the region’s avifauna and/or portions thereof (see the references listed below). Nevertheless, this is the first stand-alone field checklist to embrace the region as a whole. This checklist includes all of the species recorded within the region along with their expected seasonal occurrence. The author has followed the nomenclature and taxonomy presented in the 7th edition of the A.O.U. Check-list of North American Birds (1998) and supplements. chihuahuan desert birds This checklist includes 505 species that have been observed in the region, which is 81% of the species known to occur in Texas. A total of 244 of the species listed herein (48%) have nested at least once or are suspected as nesters. A dedicated column denotes nesting status as well as geographic occurrence (where needed) and status to provide users of this checklist with additional information on selected species. Characterization of the region’s avifauna is difficult at best because of the patchy nature of the habitats and the sporadic occurrence of numerous peripheral species. In the southeastern portion of the region a number of eastern U.S. birds reach the western limits of their ranges. Red-shouldered Hawk, Chuck-will’s-widow, Easte
Fishes of the Devils River Longnose Gar Spotted Gar Lepisosteus osseus Lepisosteus oculatus Central Stoneroller Blacktail Shiner Proserpine Shiner Campostoma anomalum Cyprinella venusta Cyprinella proserpina Texas Shiner Sand Shiner Bullhead Minnow Notropis amabilis Notropis stramineus Pimephales vigilax Manantial Roundnose Minnow Devils River Minnow Dionda argentosa Dionda diaboli Non-native Rio Grande Darter Mexican tetra Gizzard Shad Dorosoma cepedianum Common Carp River Carpsucker Gray Redhorse Cyprinus carpio Carpoides carpio Moxostoma congestum Etheostoma grahami Astyanax mexicanus Mosquitofish Sailfin Molly Gambusia sp. Headwater Catfish Channel Catfish Flathead Catfish Ictalurus lupus Ictalurus punctatus Pylodictus olivarus Poecilia latipinna Conchos Pupfish Cyprinodon eximius Non-native Non-native Green Sunfish Longear Sunfish Redear Sunfish Bluegill Redbreast Sunfish Redspotted Sunfish Lepomis cyanellus Lepomis megalotis Lepomis microlophus Lepomis macrochirus Lepomis auritus Lepomis miniatus Non-native Non-native Largemouth Bass Smallmouth Bass Blue Tilapia Rio Grande Cichlid Micropterus salmoides Micropterus dolomieu Oreochromis aureus Herichthys cyanoguttatus Photos and layout by River Studies Program- Texas Parks and Wildlife Dept. and the Fishes of Texas Project
T E X A S S T A T E P A R K S Devils River STATE NATURAL AREA B I G B E N D C O U N T RY Devils River STATE NAT URAL A RE A A remote and picturesque 20,000-acre preserve, Devils River State Natural Area sits at the junction of three ecological zones: the Chihuahuan Desert to the west, the Hill Country to the east and the Tamaulipan Brushlands of northern Mexico to the south. The terrain is mostly dry and treeless, but near the Devils River, springs gush out of the bedrock and provide sufficient moisture for groves of pecans, sycamores and spreading live oaks. Prehistoric artifacts in the area date to over 11,000 years ago, and 4,000-year-old multicolored human shapes and other designs decorate area rock shelters. More modern local Native American groups included Apaches, Comanches, Kiowas and Kickapoos. Park open Friday through Monday. Camping by advance reservation only. Camping: Primitive camping sites, group barracks (capacity 10). There are no supplies available near the park. Bring all necessary food, water and gas. Trails: Nature trails available for day hikes, mountainbiking, backcountry hikes, horseback riding. Paddling: Day-use paddling within park boundaries. Paddling outside park boundaries or overnight trips require a Devils River Access Permit (advance purchase required). River is approximately a one-mile hike from parking area. Features: Birding, nature viewing, swimming, fishing. to Sonora Dolan Creek Road 277 to Rock Springs Devils River State Natural Area Loma Alta 277 377 to Del Rio Located in Val Verde County; 3.5 miles north of Loma Alta on Highway 277; then left on Dolan Creek Road for 22 miles. Devils River State Natural Area HC 1, Box 513, Del Rio, TX 78840 • (830) 395-2133 www.texasstateparks.org Rates and reservations: (512) 389-8901. For info only: (800) 792-1112. © 2015 TPWD PWD CD P4501-151A (8/15) In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041.
-Official- FA C I L I T I E S MAPS Get the Mobile App: ACTIVITIES texasstateparks.org/app Toyota Tundra Let your sense of adventure be your guide with the Toyota Official Vehicle of the Texas Parks & Wildlife Foundation Tundra — built to help you explore all that the great state of Texas has to offer. | toyota.com/trucks BUILT HERE. LIVES HERE. ASSEMBLED IN TEXAS WITH U.S. AND GLOBALLY SOURCED PARTS. Contents 4 6 8 10 Activities and Programs Parks Near You Places to Stay Recreational Vehicles 12 Tips for Time in Nature Ray Roberts Devils River 14 Visitor Fees and Passes Directory TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT 18 Big Bend Country 26 34 48 56 64 80 86 Gulf Coast TPW COMMISSION S. Reed Morian, Chairman Houston Arch “Beaver” Aplin, III, Vice-Chairman Lake Jackson James E. Abell Kilgore Oliver J. Bell Cleveland Anna B. Galo Laredo Jeffery D. Hildebrand Houston Jeanne W. Latimer San Antonio Robert L. “Bobby” Patton, Jr. Fort Worth Dick Scott Wimberley T. Dan Friedkin, Chairman-Emeritus Houston Lee Marshall Bass, Chairman-Emeritus Fort Worth Hill Country Panhandle Plains Pineywoods Prairies and Lakes South Texas Plains Carter P. Smith Executive Director Rodney Franklin State Parks Director Josh Havens Communications Director Facilities and Activities Index 44 State Parks Map Special thanks to Toyota and advertisers, whose generous support made this guide possible. Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Cover photo: Tyler State Park, Chase Fountain Texas State Parks Official Guide, Seventeenth Edition © TPWD PWD BK P4000-000A (5/20) TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. WELCOME from Rodney Franklin, State Parks Director   Texas contains some of the most diverse public lands in the country. There is a wealth of cultural heritage. Wildlife abounds, landscapes flourish with beauty and our history is abundant. Your state parks are a part of the legacy that makes Texas proud. The people of Texas recently helped secure that legacy for future generations by voting yes to Proposition 5. Thank you! These 630,000-plus acres showcase some of our state’s greatest treasures. Parks help people make memories with family and find respite in nature’s playground. They strengthen local economies and bind communities. Most of all, parks enable each of us to spend time outside to recharge, be healthy and relax in our own way. I invite you to enjoy your state parks, exploring the best of Texas with friends and family. The parks are here for you. They belong to you. Please visit, have fun, and help protect them forever! Thank you, Texas! Texans voted to approve passage of Proposition 5 in the November 5, 2019 election. Now 100% of the sporting goods sales tax will go to fund the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and Texas Historical Commission. This funding will help secure the future of local parks, state parks and historic sites for generations to come, all without increasing taxes. We would like to extend our deepest gratitude. See what’s in store for Texas State Parks: texasstateparks.org/better ACTIVITIES & PROGRAMS What is there to do in state parks? Enjoy a family picnic, tour a hallowed historic site or choose from some of these visitor favorites: Bike Pedal across parks at any speed, in any style, with any group. Choose the routes, surfaces and distances that fit your comfort zone. Walk Start with a shorter loop, tackle tougher terrain or join a guided tour. Fish Fish without a license in as many as 70 state parks. Many offer tackle loaner programs and special learnto-fish events. Boat or Paddle Rent canoes and kayaks, explore a Texas Paddling Trail or launch a boat. View Wildlife Discover the birds, mammals and plants that live in Texas. Many parks have signage and checklists to help you learn more about the wildlife around you. 4 Camp Swim Find a site that meets your needs. Test out new recipes, share your favorite stories and enjoy the stars. Beat the heat at creeks, rivers, lakes, springs, pools and ocean beaches. More information & reservations: texasstateparks.org (512) 389-8900 Many state parks offer special guided and self-guided progra
Guía de Parques INSTALACIONES Descarga la Aplicacíon Móvil MAPAS ACTIVIDADES texasstateparks.org/app ¡Los niños entran gratis! La entrada es gratis para los niños de 12 años y menores. Encuentra un parque: parquesdetexas.org Contenido Estero Llano Grande SP 2 4 6 8 9 10 18 Actividades y Programas Parques Cercanos Lugares para Quedarse Tarifas y Pases Directorio Mapa de Parques Instalaciones y Actividades BIENVENIDO Rodney Franklin, Director de Parques Texas tiene algunas de las tierras públicas más diversas del país, con una gran riqueza natural y cultural. La vida silvestre está por todas partes, los paisajes florecen con belleza, y la historia es abundante. Sus parques estatales son parte del legado que nos enorgullece. La gente de Texas ayuda a asegurar ese legado para las generaciones futuras al visitar y ser voluntarios. ¡Gracias! Estos más de 630,000 acres exhiben algunos de los grandes tesoros del estado. Los parques nos ayudan a crear recuerdos con la familia y a encontrar consuelo en la naturaleza. Los parques fortalecen las economías locales y unen a las comunidades. Sobre todo, los parques nos permiten pasar tiempo al aire libre para recargar energías, estar saludables y relajarnos a nuestra manera. Les invito a disfrutar de sus parques estatales, explorando lo mejor de Texas con amigos y familia. Los parques están aquí para todos. Nos pertenecen a todos. ¡Visítelos, diviértase y ayude a protegerlos para siempre! Foto de portada: Estero Llano State Park, Chase Fountain © 2021 TPWD PWD BK P4000-000A (5/21) TPWD recibe fondos del Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU. (USFWS por sus siglas en ingles). TPWD prohíbe la discriminación por raza, color, religión, nacionalidad de origen, discapacidad, edad y género, conforme la ley estatal y federal. Para solicitar un acomodo especial u obtener información en un formato alternativo, por favor contacte a TPWD en un Teléfono de Texto (TTY) al (512) 3898915 ó por medio de “Relay Texas” al 7-1-1 ó (800) 735-2989 ó por email a accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. Si usted cree que TPWD ha discriminado en su contra, favor de comunicarse con TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, o con el Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU., Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. De acuerdo con la Ley de Depósito del Estado de Texas, esta publicación está disponible en el centro de Distribución de Publicaciones del Estado de Texas y/o las Bibliotecas de Depósito de Texas. ACTIVIDADES Y PROGRAMAS ¿Qué puedo hacer en los parques estatales? ¡Disfruta de un día de campo, visita un sitio histórico o elige entre muchas otras opciones! Bicicletas Pedalea a lo largo de los parques a cualquier velocidad, en cualquier estilo, con cualquier grupo. Elige las rutas, el tipo de terreno y las distancias que cumplan con tu zona de confort. Caminatas Empieza con un circuito más corto, avanza a terrenos más difíciles o únete a una caminata guiada. Pescar Puedes pescar sin licencia en tantos como 70 parques estatales. Muchos parques ofrecen equipo para pescar a manera de préstamo y eventos especiales para aprender a pescar. Barcos Renta canoas y kayacs y explora uno de los senderos acuáticos en Texas. Nadar Animales Silvestres Acampar Descubre aves, mamíferos y plantas que tienen su hogar en Texas. Muchos parques tienen señalamientos y listados que te ayudan a aprender más. Encuentra un lugar que cumpla con lo que quieres. Prueba nuevas recetas, comparte historias favoritas y disfruta de las estrellas. 2 Más información y reservaciones: parquesdetexas.org Escape del calor en arroyos, ríos, lagos, manantiales, piletas y playas del mar. Tu seguridad en el agua es muy importante. Lleva el chaleco salvavidas. Aprende a nadar. Guarda a los niños. (512) 389-8900 ¡Pregunta en tu parque cuáles están disponibles! Los niños de 12 años y menores entran GRATIS Cielos Estrellados Escapa de las luces de la ciudad y goza de maravillosas vistas del cielo que no encontrarás en ninguna otra parte. Ven a una fiesta de estrellas o toma una excursión de constelaciones auto-guiada. Familias en la Naturaleza Elige un taller o diseña tu propia aventura. ¡Monta una tienda de campaña, cocina al exterior, prende una fogata y juega al exterior! Nosotros te Toma una publicación gratuita de actividades o pregunta por los paquetes gratuitos con los parques proporcionamos todo el equipo. No es necesario tener experiencia. participantes. Usa los binoculares, lupas, libros de bosquejos y libros de guías para explorar el parque. Mochilas para Exploradores Soldados Búfalo de Texas Descubre la historia con cuentos, vestuarios y herramientas. Sigue la pista de un animal, pesca con caña, cocina sobre una fogata, visita los fuertes y más. Adéntrate en las historias de vida de aquellos que sirvieron valientemente en los primeros regimientos Áfrico-Americanos de las Fuerzas Armadas. ! Seguridad en el Parque Ten cuidado con el agua Pr

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