Enchanted Rock

State Natural Area - Texas

Enchanted Rock (16710 Ranch Rd 965, Fredericksburg TX) is a pink granite mountain located in the Llano Uplift approximately 17 miles (27 km) north of Fredericksburg, Texas and 24 miles (39 km) south of Llano, Texas, United States. Enchanted Rock State Natural Area spans the border between Gillespie County and Llano County, south of the Llano River. Enchanted Rock rises approximately 425 feet (130 m) above the surrounding terrain to elevation of 1,825 feet (556 m) above sea level. It is the largest pink granite monadnock in the United States.

maps

Trails Map of Enchanted Rock State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Enchanted Rock - Trails Map

Trails Map of Enchanted Rock State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

brochures

Park Map of Enchanted Rock State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Enchanted Rock - Map

Park Map of Enchanted Rock State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Trails Map of Enchanted Rock State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Enchanted Rock - Trails

Trails Map of Enchanted Rock State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Interpretive Trail Guide of Enchanted Rock State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Enchanted Rock - Interpretive Trail Guide

Interpretive Trail Guide of Enchanted Rock State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Climbing at Enchanted Rock State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Enchanted Rock - Climbing

Climbing at Enchanted Rock State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Camping at Enchanted Rock State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Enchanted Rock - Camping

Camping at Enchanted Rock State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Vernal Pools at Enchanted Rock State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Enchanted Rock - Vernal Pools

Vernal Pools at Enchanted Rock State Natural Area (SNA) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Official Texas State Parks Guide. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Texas State - Official Texas State Parks Guide

Official Texas State Parks Guide. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Official Texas State Parks Guide (español). Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Texas State - Guía de Parques

Official Texas State Parks Guide (español). Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Enchanted Rock SNA https://tpwd.texas.gov/state-parks/enchanted-rock https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enchanted_Rock Enchanted Rock (16710 Ranch Rd 965, Fredericksburg TX) is a pink granite mountain located in the Llano Uplift approximately 17 miles (27 km) north of Fredericksburg, Texas and 24 miles (39 km) south of Llano, Texas, United States. Enchanted Rock State Natural Area spans the border between Gillespie County and Llano County, south of the Llano River. Enchanted Rock rises approximately 425 feet (130 m) above the surrounding terrain to elevation of 1,825 feet (556 m) above sea level. It is the largest pink granite monadnock in the United States.
Enchanted Rock #TxStateParks For emergencies after 5 p.m., dial 9-1-1 State Natural Area #BetterOutside /texasparksandwildlife @texasparkswildlife Flag Pole 1.20 p Loo .72 reek 00 .28 150 e Trail Bas .29 (Reservation Required) 0 Buzzard’s Roost .69 .55 16 C 0 l Trail .34 Echo C .20 0 160 Turkey Peak .38 a n y o n Tr ail 170 0 Little Rock 16 00 Su m m i i ra tT .57 15 .16 1705 Access for Buzzard Roost Group Camping Area .67 00 op Park Boundary 170 Freshman Mountain 0 180 1825 Enchanted Rock Lo .07 Tra i 0 Loop T rai l an yo n Walnut Springs Primitive Camping Area 00 160 ho Ec Moss Lake .40 Frog Pond l .16 16 Gazebo 00 Sa nd y Cr k .19 ee .21 T op rail Lo 0 15 .23 Loop T r ai Loop Trail is approximately 4 miles Summit Trail climbs 425 feet in 0.6 miles • T-shirts, caps and one-of-a-kind gift items are available at the Texas State Park Store located in our park headquarters building. When hiking the trails, take a quart of water per person and pack out what you pack in. Park Boundary TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. © 2019 TPWD PWD MP P4507-119C (2/19) Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. WARNING Showers Trail, cave and rock conditions are inherently hazardous; visitors may encounter slippery surfaces, steep inclines, vertical drops and other hazardous conditions. Compost Toilet It is unlawful to disfigure, remove, excavate or destroy any paleontological, prehistoric or historic site or artifact. Violators may be punished by a fine or confinement in jail. A scientific permit is required to gather any type of fossil, rock, plant or animal. Primitive Campsites Group Camping Interpretive Center Hiking Trail Picnic Area Playground • Texas State Parks Store l State Parks Store • • • • • 0 Water Only Camping Area Headquarters Group Picnic Pavilion • N Pets are allowed ONLY within in the green shaded areas and on green shaded trails, and must remain on leashes at all times. PLEASE NOTE • 1.0 TexasStateParks.org/App Restrooms Park Boundary Turkey Pass Trail .32 PETS 0 C Sandy 15 15 00 Moss Lake Primitive Camping Area .22 150 Buzzard Roost Group Camping Area Trail L rail oop T @TPWDparks LEGEND Park Boundary No bikes permitted on park trails. /enchantedrock • • • • • • CHECK OUT time is 2 p.m. or renew permit by 9 a.m. (pending site availability). Summit trail closed during rain events. All climbers must sign waiver at Headquarters building. Public consumption or display of any alcoholic beverage is prohibited. Park is open from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily, except during public hunts. Day use visitors must leave the park by 10 p.m. A maximum of eight people per tent site with water are allowed; four people per tent site in primitive area. Please see Fee Schedule. Excess parking fee is required at campsites with more than two vehicles (including trailers). Campsite must be kept clean; all trash must be picked up before you leave. Trash dumpsters are conveniently located on all camping loops. Overnight camping is not permitted in any area outside the designated campgrounds. No vehicle camping; no RV’s, camper trailers or any large vehicles are permitted to cross the bridge. Pets must be kept on leash. Please pick up after them. Valid permit is required on windshield of each vehicle in park. All vehicles are to remain on pavement. Numbered sites for overnight camping only. NO PICNICKING. Gathering of firewood is prohibited. No fires in primitive area. Campfires are permitted only in fire rings provided at each water only site. No ground fires are permitted. Please, use extreme caution with any burning materials during the high-fire danger summer brings. PARK RESERVATIONS TexasStateParks.org ParquesDeTexas.org (512) 389-8900 Scenic View Dog Station Pets Allowed Enchanted Rock State Natural Area Headquarters Open 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., 7 days a week. Extended office hours during high visitation. 16710 Ranch Road 965 Fredericksburg, TX 78624-6554 (830) 685-3636 Proud Sponsor of Texas State Parks
Enchanted Rock State Natural Area Trails Map 1.30 POINTS OF INTEREST Flag Pole (GPS coordinates shown in degrees, minutes, seconds) 00 16 1400 ' 0. 31 Enchanted Rock Echo Canyon Trail (0.67 mi.) 3 1825' ' 00 4 15 ' 00 2 0. 1600' 1482' 0. 71 1400' ' 00 15 1.0 Park Entrance SCENIC OVERLOOK 30° 30.303" N 098° 49.963" W Relax and enjoy a quiet, beautiful Hill Country sunset and views of the surrounding Texas landscape. Painted Buntings ' 00 15 0 1500 Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. ' 0.5 1488' ' © 2018 Texas Parks and Wildlife Department PWD MP P4507-119Q (7/18) 15 00 TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or ' by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, 5please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. 00 1 ' 00 15 to Fredricksburg 2,000 1,000 0 In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. 1500' 8 1400' 0' 140 ' 1414' No claims are made to the accuracy of the data or to the suitability of the data to a particular use. ECHO CANYON 30° 30.321" N 098° 49.139" W Stop in this beautiful area for some shade under the oaks and a picnic in the boulders. ' 15 0.21 4 0.2 00 All trails are multi-use unless otherwise indicated. Contour intervals 20 feet. Trail lengths are in miles. Elevation levels are in feet. Map compiled by Texas State Parks staff. 7 1500' 0.08 ' MOSS LAKE 30° 30.566" N 098° 49.559" W Enjoy awe-inspiring views of Enchanted Rock and Little Rock. 1411' Connecting Trail (0.16 mi.) 1 ' Sa 0.11 42 0. 1500' 16 nd 2 0. 00 15 375' y C re 1700' PETS ALLOWED IN CAMPGROUNDS, PICNIC AREAS AND LOOP TRAIL ONLY 00 6 00 1700' 3 0.1 Loop Trail (4.25 mi.) BUZZARD‘S ROOST 30° 30.486" N 098°48.520" W Crossing Sandy Creek from the south, you’ll see the massive exfoliation sheet on Buzzard's Roost. 14 ' 00 16 0. ' 1600' 5 Frog Pond 14 ' 1600 Interpretive Loop (0.50 mi.) 00 TURKEY PEAK 30°30.180"N 098°48.881" W Check out the jagged rocks of Turkey Peak! 23 0. Frontside Trail (0.34 mi.) 400' 16 4 ' 16 00 2 160 ek 0' 8 0.3 Little Rock ENCHANTED ROCK SUMMIT 30° 30.386" N 098° 49.129" W You'll see 360° views of the park and the Texas Hill Country from the 1823 ft. summit of Enchanted Rock. 58 0. ' 00 16 ' Scenic View Trail (0.09 mi.) Turkey Peak Summit Trail (0.67 mi.) 17 09 0. 8 0.1 3 1383' 965 40 0. Group Campsite 1600' 1500' 0. 57 00 8 Interpretive Trail Connecting Trail (0.55 mi.) ' Scenic Overlook 7 1 0.4 ' LITTLE ROCK 30° 29.963" N 098° 49.273" W Check out the giant boulders and other exfoliation features of Little Rock. 15 00 ' 16 Turkey Pass Trail (0.71 mi.) 1800' Playground 2 00 Compost Toilet INTERPRETIVE LOOP 30° 29.108" N 098° 49.129" W This easy 1/2-mile stroll highlights the flora and fauna at the 7 natural area. Get a brochure at the trailhead to learn more! Freshman Mountain 0.1 7 6 0.3 Walnut Springs Primitive Camping Area Buzzard’s Roost Trail (0.71 mi.) 1 14 Dog Allowed 06 0. Moss Lake Primitive Camping 3 0.3 6 Day Use Area 0.16 5 0 0.3 0.06 ut aln W Parking r Sp Buzzard’s Roost Primitive Camping Area Buzzard's Roost Moss Lake Trail (0.55 mi.) ' ing Showers 7 0.7 00 ek e Cr 0.12 Restroom Base Trail (0.88 mi.) 15 2 0.2 Headquarters 1500' Moss Lake Primitive Camping Area 0.58 Walnut Springs Trail (0.77 mi.) LEGEND Group Pavilion 1500' 1463' 16710 Ranch Rd. 965 Fredericksburg, TX 78624 (830) 685-3636 www.texasstateparks.org 1400' 1400' 3,000 4,000 Feet 1 Mile Enchanted Rock State Natural Area Scenic views, geological wonders, and stunning beauty await. TRAIL DIST TIME DIFFICULTY DESCRIPTION INTERPRETIVE LOOP .5 mi. 45 min. Easy This short trail provides an up-close look at many special plants and animals plants and animals that live near the base of Little Rock. LOOP TRAIL 4.49 mi. 2.5 hrs. ModerateDifficult Take plenty of water with you on this trek around the perimeter of the park. The granite pathway pathway takes you to to incredible views of the natural area. TURKEY PASS TRAIL .71 mi. 45 min. Moderate This shortcut gives you great views of Enchanted Rock on one side, with Turkey Peak and Freshman Mountain on the other. BASE TRAIL .88 mi. 30 min. Moderate From the intersection of Turkey Pass Trail or Echo Canyon Trail, take this trail around the back side of the Rock for a different persp
0.11 Enchanted Rock 1600' S tate N at u r a l A r ea Loop For more information on Trail the Friends Group, visit www.friendsofenchantedrock.com (4.25 mi.) 1500' Interpretive Trail Guide A Special Thanks to John Hueckstaedt 15 Interpretive Loop (0.50 mi.) 42 . 0 0.21 ' 16 0. Project Sponsors ' 00 15 4 0.2 0.08 00 Sa n 0. 16 00 ' 16 00 0' 140 ' 1414' Whole Earth Provision Co. www.wholeearthprovision.com 1.0 Enchanted Rock State Natural Area (830) ' 685-3636 00 www.tpwd.texas.gov/enchantedrock 15 © 2015 Texas Parks and Wildlife Department PWD BR P4507-119R (6/15) In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. Welcome to Enchanted Rock’s Interpretive Trail! This half-mile loop exemplifies the diversity of the area. As it winds through grassland and forest and skirts the base of Little Rock, take note of the variety of hardwood trees and numerous forbs, ferns and shrubs that have adapted to living at the edge of the rock. The trail contrasts the richness of the forest to the stark beauty of the granite and the ever-changing skies above. And with just a little imagination, you can experience the echoes of past humans. What may have attracted people to this area? What brought you here? his publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. As you enjoy your walk, please follow these trail guidelines for a safe trip! Park • Always carry water and a map. Entrance • Stay on the trail to protect yourself and the resources. • Keep pets on a leash to keep them safe and protect wildlife. • Respect wildlife by keeping a safe distance from them. • Leave No Trace. Take only pictures and leave only footprints. The Riparian Sponge Hold On Tight! Woods and Water The Big Picture Many Hill Country streams are ephemeral, or temporary. Sandy Creek is no different, and even when it appears dry, this riparian area stores water underground and sustains a small stream flow. Many plants like switchgrass, gamagrass, muhly and buttonbush depend on this stored water to survive. Lichens and mosses establish footholds in nooks and crannies that have just enough space for soil and water to collect in. A variety of lichens that colonize granite surfaces and mosses covering many rocks along the trail. Most commonly you will find the crustose (growing like a crust) lichens painting the rocks red, neon green, black, and bright orange. Many shrubs and larger trees thrive from water available in the sandy soil at the base of the rock. You’ll see cedar elm, Texas buckeye, post oak and live oak in this shadier area. Look even closer for the granite mountain wild buckwheat (Eriogonum tenellum), a low growing light gray bush found among small granite outcroppings in spring and summer. Lonestar Grass Live Oak Community Plateau live oak trees (Quercus fusiformis), common to the Hill Country, can live to be hundreds of years old. Oak mottes are groupings of small oaks connected by a single root system. See if you can spot the live oaks along the trail. Look closer at the live oak’s branches to spot small clumps of ball moss. Ball moss is an ephiphyte, taking nothing from the tree as it gets moisture and nutrients from the air. Rock to Soil Notice the cracks in the rock and the missing pieces of the granite puzzles. Over millions of years, weathering has cracked, chipped, and whittled away at layers of the granite domes in front of you. It begins with a process called exfoliation, whereby large pieces of granite separate themselves from the granite mass, much like an onion skin. The erosion of granite creates a unique soil environment that allows flora and fauna to thrive and grow in this otherwise dry and rocky landscape. The People of Enchanted Rock Humans have inhabited Central Texas and the areas around Enchanted Rock for over 12,000 years. Native Americans as far back as the Clovis and more recently the Tonkawa, Apache, and Comanche relied on the resources available around the sacred rock. Some plants they found useful were the persimmon and mesquite. They even used depressions in the granite to grind seeds into flour! Ferns of Enchanted Rock Enchanted Rock is home to a surprisingly large number of fern species. Over 25 different ferns have been recorded here. One of th
So You Want To Rock Climb or Boulder At E-Rock? Important notes for climbers from the CTCC Traditional Area By its designation as a State Natural Area, the natural character and features of Enchanted Rock are protected for the enjoyment of all visitors. We’re very fortunate that the granite domes and boulders at Enchanted Rock have enjoyed a long and ongoing history of traditional-style ascents. The use of pitons is never allowed, and crack climbs are almost exclusively protected using trad gear. A few climbs involve a mix of pre-placed bolts and trad gear placements (for example Mercy Street on the News Wall). It is against park rules and regulations to use trees or other plants for protection, anchoring or rappelling, and any such use is punishable by a fine. As climbers we have a responsibility to be respectful of our surroundings and of the rights of other park visitors. If you would like to learn how to trad climb or to place removable (“clean”) anchors, there are several experienced guide services available for Enchanted Rock, and a list of these is available at www.tpwd.tx.us/state-parks/enchanted-rock. It is advised that you fully learn and become fluent with these techniques before you attempt climbing in this traditional way. Fixed Protection No alteration of any rock feature or bolt is allowed without explicit written approval from TPWD. There are fixed expansion bolts placed as climbing protection in many areas at Enchanted Rock. Many of these climbs were originally bolted on lead, from the ground up. For the most part bolted routes should be considered “sporty” rather than “sport” meaning that there (continued on other side) (continued from other side) may be substantial run-outs between anchors, increasing the risk of falls. The park and community want to sustain the legacy of these climbs and consider them and their story important to the climbing history at Enchanted Rock SNA. Before you start a climb, please be sure you know what you are getting into and that you are capable of safely leading the route. In case you may be unsure, many climbs are easily set up for top-roping. Rope Length As a traditional area, Enchanted Rock was bolted in the same fashion as many other multi-pitch trad areas. The anchors are designed for you to treat the climb as a multi-pitch endeavor and either walk off the top or rappel from designated rap stations. This means for instance that the climbing rope will not reach the ground to enable safely lowering a climber or rappelling from the anchors of various climbs on the northwest side of the main dome. In fact many rappel stations in that area require at least a 70 meter rope. We strongly suggest that you always tie a safety knot near the end of your rope before climbing or rappelling. The next suggestion is to traverse to the rappel station on the News Wall to descend from all of the back side climbs. This station is in Beer Can Alley between the climbs Nobody Likes Bryant Gumbel and Late Nite. You will find two large rap bolts at the break in the boulders. Please do not use this rap station for top-roping or other purposes (except in an emergency), to keep the bolts available for use in descending. Bolt Placements and Route Maintenance Under a long-standing agreement with TPWD, the Central Texas Climbing Committee (CTCC) oversees and maintains all fixed protection and anchors at Enchanted Rock. If you feel there is a placement that needs attention for any reason, please advise the park staff and also contact us promptly at centraltexascc@gmail.com. Please do not attempt to perform any maintenance work on your own, and be aware that any modification of the rock or an existing placement is illegal. Enchanted Rock SNA Climbing Routes List This brief list attempts to provide interested individuals with general information on the location and difficulty of a few representative climbs in various areas within the park. The climbs listed are rated according to the Yosemite Decimal System, and range from 5.0 to 5.11 with higher ratings indicating increasing difficulty. The short phrases following the rating indicate the type of climb and the quality of available protection (providing you find it). Most routes car be top-roped if an upper belay is desired. Free climbing is permitted in the park; the placement of bolts, pitons or other devices that deface the rock in any manner is not allowed. CLIMB CLEAN! EXISTING HARDWARE IS NOT APPROVED OR MAINTAINED BY TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT. THE DEPARTMENT IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ACCIDENTS AND VISITORS CLIMB AT THEIR OWN RISK. Climb Name Becky Ben's Dilemma Boston Cave Crack Can Opener Chunky Tuna Cubes Dungeon Easier Than it Looks Eat Edge of Night Fear of Flying Frog False Determination Grand Traverse Grass Crack Hangover In The Beginning There Were Ducks Innominate Lichen Delight Little Feat Little Friskies Lunch Rock Middle Crack Mirage Motorboat Orange Peel Owl Raw Meat Ripple Runamuck Sanders Traverse Smorgasbo
Enchanted Rock @TPWDparks TexasStateParks.org/App LEGEND Lo o To Rock ) only. @texasparkswildlife /enchantedrock p ail Tr Headquarters State Parks Store Cr e No vehicle camping. Tent camping only. Showers Tent Pad Only Loop Telescope Gazebo Restrooms ek Trail No hammocks in trees. Hammocks on shade shelters ( #BetterOutside /texasparksandwildlife Sa nd y No bikes permitted on park trails. #TxStateParks Summit T rail State Natural Area — Tent Camping For emergencies after 5 p.m., dial 9-1-1 Tent Pad & Shade Shelter Interpretive Center Hiking Trail Trailhead Picnic Area Parking RR 96 5 Playground Telescope N Lo Tr ail San dy Cr e op ek Bus and trailer parking Enchanted Rock State Natural Area Headquarters Texas State Parks Store RR 965 Park Boundary TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. © 2019 TPWD PWD MP P4507-119E (1/19) Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. T-shirts, caps and one-of-a-kind gift items are available at the Texas State Park Store located in our park headquarters building. Open 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., 7 days a week. Extended office hours during high visitation. 16710 Ranch Road 965 Fredericksburg, TX 78624-6554 (830) 685-3636 PARK RESERVATIONS TexasStateParks.org ParquesDeTexas.org (512) 389-8900
TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE VERNAL POOLS AT Enchanted Rock STATE NATURAL AREA A Threatened Natural Resource The “islands” of vegetation on the bare granite summit of Enchanted Rock are some of the most ecologically significant and severely threatened features of this state natural area. Known as soil islands, weathering pits, gammas or vernal pools, these patches of vegetation on bare rock develop in depressions formed by weathering over thousands of years. The depressions shelter an assemblage of plants and animals uniquely adapted to a harsh environment. In fact, by studying weathering pits, ecologists learn: (1) how plants and animals colonize a newly formed habitat; (2) how those organisms modify their environment and help develop soils; and, (3) how plant and animal community structure and composition change over time. At Enchanted Rock you can see the progressive development from bare rock-bottom pits, to annual plant establishment, to miniature prairies with grasses like little bluestem and even trees like live oak. Vernal pools also support an interesting species of invertebrate, the fairy shrimp. These tiny animals survive total desiccation as fertilized eggs, and hatch into larvae and grow into adults each time water collects after sufficient rainfall. Because of the fragile nature of weathering pits, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department wants to make sure visitors are aware of their significance. Too often they are perceived as nothing more than convenient rest areas or even “bathrooms” and are subject to trampling, littering and other forms of waste. PLEASE REFRAIN FROM ENTERING WEATHERING PITS UNDER ANY CONDITION. Enjoy and observe these special features only from their granite margins – STAY ON THE ROCK. Thank you for protecting an important part of the Enchanted Rock experience. © 2018 TPWD PWD CD P4507-119P (4/18) In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041.
-Official- FA C I L I T I E S MAPS Get the Mobile App: ACTIVITIES texasstateparks.org/app Toyota Tundra Let your sense of adventure be your guide with the Toyota Official Vehicle of the Texas Parks & Wildlife Foundation Tundra — built to help you explore all that the great state of Texas has to offer. | toyota.com/trucks BUILT HERE. LIVES HERE. ASSEMBLED IN TEXAS WITH U.S. AND GLOBALLY SOURCED PARTS. Contents 4 6 8 10 Activities and Programs Parks Near You Places to Stay Recreational Vehicles 12 Tips for Time in Nature Ray Roberts Devils River 14 Visitor Fees and Passes Directory TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT 18 Big Bend Country 26 34 48 56 64 80 86 Gulf Coast TPW COMMISSION S. Reed Morian, Chairman Houston Arch “Beaver” Aplin, III, Vice-Chairman Lake Jackson James E. Abell Kilgore Oliver J. Bell Cleveland Anna B. Galo Laredo Jeffery D. Hildebrand Houston Jeanne W. Latimer San Antonio Robert L. “Bobby” Patton, Jr. Fort Worth Dick Scott Wimberley T. Dan Friedkin, Chairman-Emeritus Houston Lee Marshall Bass, Chairman-Emeritus Fort Worth Hill Country Panhandle Plains Pineywoods Prairies and Lakes South Texas Plains Carter P. Smith Executive Director Rodney Franklin State Parks Director Josh Havens Communications Director Facilities and Activities Index 44 State Parks Map Special thanks to Toyota and advertisers, whose generous support made this guide possible. Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Cover photo: Tyler State Park, Chase Fountain Texas State Parks Official Guide, Seventeenth Edition © TPWD PWD BK P4000-000A (5/20) TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. WELCOME from Rodney Franklin, State Parks Director   Texas contains some of the most diverse public lands in the country. There is a wealth of cultural heritage. Wildlife abounds, landscapes flourish with beauty and our history is abundant. Your state parks are a part of the legacy that makes Texas proud. The people of Texas recently helped secure that legacy for future generations by voting yes to Proposition 5. Thank you! These 630,000-plus acres showcase some of our state’s greatest treasures. Parks help people make memories with family and find respite in nature’s playground. They strengthen local economies and bind communities. Most of all, parks enable each of us to spend time outside to recharge, be healthy and relax in our own way. I invite you to enjoy your state parks, exploring the best of Texas with friends and family. The parks are here for you. They belong to you. Please visit, have fun, and help protect them forever! Thank you, Texas! Texans voted to approve passage of Proposition 5 in the November 5, 2019 election. Now 100% of the sporting goods sales tax will go to fund the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and Texas Historical Commission. This funding will help secure the future of local parks, state parks and historic sites for generations to come, all without increasing taxes. We would like to extend our deepest gratitude. See what’s in store for Texas State Parks: texasstateparks.org/better ACTIVITIES & PROGRAMS What is there to do in state parks? Enjoy a family picnic, tour a hallowed historic site or choose from some of these visitor favorites: Bike Pedal across parks at any speed, in any style, with any group. Choose the routes, surfaces and distances that fit your comfort zone. Walk Start with a shorter loop, tackle tougher terrain or join a guided tour. Fish Fish without a license in as many as 70 state parks. Many offer tackle loaner programs and special learnto-fish events. Boat or Paddle Rent canoes and kayaks, explore a Texas Paddling Trail or launch a boat. View Wildlife Discover the birds, mammals and plants that live in Texas. Many parks have signage and checklists to help you learn more about the wildlife around you. 4 Camp Swim Find a site that meets your needs. Test out new recipes, share your favorite stories and enjoy the stars. Beat the heat at creeks, rivers, lakes, springs, pools and ocean beaches. More information & reservations: texasstateparks.org (512) 389-8900 Many state parks offer special guided and self-guided progra
Guía de Parques INSTALACIONES Descarga la Aplicacíon Móvil MAPAS ACTIVIDADES texasstateparks.org/app ¡Los niños entran gratis! La entrada es gratis para los niños de 12 años y menores. Encuentra un parque: parquesdetexas.org Contenido Estero Llano Grande SP 2 4 6 8 9 10 18 Actividades y Programas Parques Cercanos Lugares para Quedarse Tarifas y Pases Directorio Mapa de Parques Instalaciones y Actividades BIENVENIDO Rodney Franklin, Director de Parques Texas tiene algunas de las tierras públicas más diversas del país, con una gran riqueza natural y cultural. La vida silvestre está por todas partes, los paisajes florecen con belleza, y la historia es abundante. Sus parques estatales son parte del legado que nos enorgullece. La gente de Texas ayuda a asegurar ese legado para las generaciones futuras al visitar y ser voluntarios. ¡Gracias! Estos más de 630,000 acres exhiben algunos de los grandes tesoros del estado. Los parques nos ayudan a crear recuerdos con la familia y a encontrar consuelo en la naturaleza. Los parques fortalecen las economías locales y unen a las comunidades. Sobre todo, los parques nos permiten pasar tiempo al aire libre para recargar energías, estar saludables y relajarnos a nuestra manera. Les invito a disfrutar de sus parques estatales, explorando lo mejor de Texas con amigos y familia. Los parques están aquí para todos. Nos pertenecen a todos. ¡Visítelos, diviértase y ayude a protegerlos para siempre! Foto de portada: Estero Llano State Park, Chase Fountain © 2021 TPWD PWD BK P4000-000A (5/21) TPWD recibe fondos del Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU. (USFWS por sus siglas en ingles). TPWD prohíbe la discriminación por raza, color, religión, nacionalidad de origen, discapacidad, edad y género, conforme la ley estatal y federal. Para solicitar un acomodo especial u obtener información en un formato alternativo, por favor contacte a TPWD en un Teléfono de Texto (TTY) al (512) 3898915 ó por medio de “Relay Texas” al 7-1-1 ó (800) 735-2989 ó por email a accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. Si usted cree que TPWD ha discriminado en su contra, favor de comunicarse con TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, o con el Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU., Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. De acuerdo con la Ley de Depósito del Estado de Texas, esta publicación está disponible en el centro de Distribución de Publicaciones del Estado de Texas y/o las Bibliotecas de Depósito de Texas. ACTIVIDADES Y PROGRAMAS ¿Qué puedo hacer en los parques estatales? ¡Disfruta de un día de campo, visita un sitio histórico o elige entre muchas otras opciones! Bicicletas Pedalea a lo largo de los parques a cualquier velocidad, en cualquier estilo, con cualquier grupo. Elige las rutas, el tipo de terreno y las distancias que cumplan con tu zona de confort. Caminatas Empieza con un circuito más corto, avanza a terrenos más difíciles o únete a una caminata guiada. Pescar Puedes pescar sin licencia en tantos como 70 parques estatales. Muchos parques ofrecen equipo para pescar a manera de préstamo y eventos especiales para aprender a pescar. Barcos Renta canoas y kayacs y explora uno de los senderos acuáticos en Texas. Nadar Animales Silvestres Acampar Descubre aves, mamíferos y plantas que tienen su hogar en Texas. Muchos parques tienen señalamientos y listados que te ayudan a aprender más. Encuentra un lugar que cumpla con lo que quieres. Prueba nuevas recetas, comparte historias favoritas y disfruta de las estrellas. 2 Más información y reservaciones: parquesdetexas.org Escape del calor en arroyos, ríos, lagos, manantiales, piletas y playas del mar. Tu seguridad en el agua es muy importante. Lleva el chaleco salvavidas. Aprende a nadar. Guarda a los niños. (512) 389-8900 ¡Pregunta en tu parque cuáles están disponibles! Los niños de 12 años y menores entran GRATIS Cielos Estrellados Escapa de las luces de la ciudad y goza de maravillosas vistas del cielo que no encontrarás en ninguna otra parte. Ven a una fiesta de estrellas o toma una excursión de constelaciones auto-guiada. Familias en la Naturaleza Elige un taller o diseña tu propia aventura. ¡Monta una tienda de campaña, cocina al exterior, prende una fogata y juega al exterior! Nosotros te Toma una publicación gratuita de actividades o pregunta por los paquetes gratuitos con los parques proporcionamos todo el equipo. No es necesario tener experiencia. participantes. Usa los binoculares, lupas, libros de bosquejos y libros de guías para explorar el parque. Mochilas para Exploradores Soldados Búfalo de Texas Descubre la historia con cuentos, vestuarios y herramientas. Sigue la pista de un animal, pesca con caña, cocina sobre una fogata, visita los fuertes y más. Adéntrate en las historias de vida de aquellos que sirvieron valientemente en los primeros regimientos Áfrico-Americanos de las Fuerzas Armadas. ! Seguridad en el Parque Ten cuidado con el agua Pr

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