Fort Parker

State Park - Texas

Fort Parker State Park is located near Mexia and to Limestone County seat Groesbeck, Texas. The park has three hike-and-bike trails: Springfield trail (1.5-mile loop), Navasota River Trail (0.5 mile one way), and Baines Creek Trail (2.5 miles one way). The Bur Oak Trail (0.5-mile loop) is a nature trail with an interpretive guide pamphlet available. The Fort Parker Nature Center is open every weekend. Canoe, kayaks, and paddleboats are available for rental. Day use, overnight camping, group barracks, an activity center, and a picnic pavilion are all available for rent.

maps

Trails Map of Fort Parker State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Fort Parker - Trails Map

Trails Map of Fort Parker State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

brochures

Campground Map of Fort Parker State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Fort Parker - Map

Campground Map of Fort Parker State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Trails Map of Fort Parker State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Fort Parker - Trails

Trails Map of Fort Parker State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Interpretive Guide of Fort Parker State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Fort Parker - Interpretive Guide

Interpretive Guide of Fort Parker State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Birds at Fort Parker State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Fort Parker - Birds

Birds at Fort Parker State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Official Texas State Parks Guide. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Texas State - Official Texas State Parks Guide

Official Texas State Parks Guide. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Official Texas State Parks Guide (español). Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Texas State - Guía de Parques

Official Texas State Parks Guide (español). Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Fort Parker SP https://tpwd.texas.gov/state-parks/fort-parker https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Parker_State_Park Fort Parker State Park is located near Mexia and to Limestone County seat Groesbeck, Texas. The park has three hike-and-bike trails: Springfield trail (1.5-mile loop), Navasota River Trail (0.5 mile one way), and Baines Creek Trail (2.5 miles one way). The Bur Oak Trail (0.5-mile loop) is a nature trail with an interpretive guide pamphlet available. The Fort Parker Nature Center is open every weekend. Canoe, kayaks, and paddleboats are available for rental. Day use, overnight camping, group barracks, an activity center, and a picnic pavilion are all available for rent.
For assistance using this map, contact the park. Fort Parker State Park TexasStateParks.org/App Park closes at 10 p.m. except to overnight visitors. River Loop Trail 48 47 45 44 49 46 43 42 41 • CHECK OUT time is 12 p.m. or renew permit by 9 a.m. (pending site availability). • Public consumption or display of any alcoholic beverage is prohibited. • A maximum of eight people permitted per campsite. Quiet time from 10 p.m. – 6 a.m. Day-use guests must leave the park by 10 p.m. • An excess parking fee is required at campsites with more than two vehicles. • Campsite must be kept clean; all trash must be picked up before leaving. Dumpsters are conveniently located on all camping loops. • Only one unit per site is permitted to hook up to utilities. 40 Na va so ta Ri ve Ri rT rai l ve (bl ue) rR oa d 14 8 11 17 18 19 9 10 8 7 5 Showers Parking Group Camp Water Only Tent Sites Water and Electric Sites Group Barracks 1 4 3 2 1 Biking Trail Vault Toilet PARK ROAD 22 r Hiking Trail ia ve 5 Historic Marker Explore 5.3 miles on the Navasota River corridor between the Confederate Reunion Grounds and Fort Parker State Park. 3 20 21 Ri Restrooms Recreation Hall & Nature Center Limestone Bluffs Paddling Trail 4 6 ex ta Headquarters Shelters/Cabins 6 9 10 M To so • Pets must be kept on leash no longer than six feet and must not be left unattended. Please pick up after them. Pets are not permitted in any buildings, including screen shelters. • Valid permit required on windshield of each vehicle in park. All vehicles are to remain on pavement. • Numbered sites for overnight camping only. NO PICNICKING. • Permit required for all areas. • Please follow boat launch protocol. • Canoes and kayaks are available for rental at park headquarters. • Firewood can be purchased at park headquarters. • Stop the spread of invasive species. CLEAN, DRAIN and DRY your boat. 7 2 va #BetterOutside Dump Station 13 12 15 16 #TxStateParks LEGEND PLEASE NOTE Scout Camping Wilderness Na TexasStateParks.org/SocialMedia 23 24 Picnic Area 28 25 Picnic Shelter 14 TEXAS Group Picnic Boat Dock Discovery Center Recreation Hall and Nature Center Bur Oak Nature Trail (green) Springfield Trail (yellow) Boat Ramp Fishing Springfield Cemetery Fishing Pier gfield Fish Cleaning Sprin Fort Parker Lake Fort Par ker Lake Swimming ine sC Maintenance ree kT rai l (m TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. © 2021 TPWD PWD MP P4503-034B (2/21) Wheelchair Accessible Park Host Site Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. aro esbeck Ba Playground Residence on ) To Gro N Dam Keep Off Dam To Old Spring PARK RESERVATIONS TexasStateParks.org ParquesDeTexas.org (512) 389-8900 194 Park Road 28 Mexia, TX 76667 (254) 562-5751 Proud Sponsor of Texas State Parks
For assistance using this map, contact the park. For a web version of the map text, visit our Trails Information page.
INTERPRETIVE GUIDE © ROBERT HENSLEY A CALM LAKE ON THE NAVASOTA RIVER, A QUIET GRAVEYARD FULL OF MEMORIES, SECLUDED SPRINGS GUARDED BY LARGE BUR OAK TREES. ALL OF THESE ARE PART OF THE TRANQUILITY OF FORT PARKER STATE PARK. YET THE PARK ALSO REFLECTS THE CHALLENGES AND CONFLICTS OF THE PEOPLE WHO LIVED IN LIMESTONE COUNTY DURING THE SETTLEMENT OF THE FRONTIER, THE AFTERMATH OF RECONSTRUCTION AND Fort Parker State Park is a great place to spend the day with your children. Whether you are looking for a shady picnic spot with room for the kids to run-and-play, spectacular hiking trails, or a visit to our Nature Center, there is plenty of fun for the entire family. Visitors can enjoy fishing, mountain biking, hiking, canoeing, kayaking, bird-watching, swimming, and many other outdoor activities. Historic Springfield Cemetery, located within the park, is a reminder of a once clamoring city. In 1860, Springfield’s population of 4,537 was over twice the population of Dallas, Texas (2,000) and rivaling the city of Houston (4,845) at that time. We offer weekly interpretive programs about the native wildlife and unique cultural history during peak season. Amenities include facilities for camping – including a Boy Scout Wilderness Area, picnicking, family and large group events. Playgrounds, group barracks and dining hall, open pavilion, and a recreation hall provide modern comforts for most any size group. The park’s Annual Trout Clinic is a favorite for young fishing enthusiasts – what a thrill to catch your first rainbow trout! Fort Parker State Park 194 Park Road 28, Mexia, Texas 76667 (254) 562-5751 • www.tpwd.texas.gov/fortparker Cover photo: Susan Metcalf Loomis, TPWD. THE ECONOMIC DEVASTATION OF THE GREAT DEPRESSION. © 2019 TPWD. PWD BR P4503-034 (7/19) In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. FORT PARKER S TAT E PA RK F O R T P A R K E R S T A T E P A R K NATURAL CROSSROADS SPRINGFIELD Once a bustling county seat boasting a stage line, college, weekly newspaper and several hotels, the community of Springfield thrived from the 1840s through the 1860s. E © ROBERT HENSLEY arly Mexican land grants described plentiful springs, prairies and woodlands along the Navasota River. With water and timber available, pioneers like the John Parker family claimed the lands at this natural crossroads where the grasses of the Blackland Prairie mingle with the woodlands of the Post Oak Savannah. Logs of cedar were stacked and notched, chinked and daubed to make cabins. South of the river, the Parker family built a large stockade to protect their families and livestock. The area was also a crossroads for Native Americans. The Comanche warriors who ruled the Great Plains crossed the Navasota River north of here to raid the Parker family stockade. On the morning of May 19, 1836, a band of Comanches, Kiowas and Kichais attacked the Parker Fort. Five settlers died and another five were kidnapped, including nine-yearold Cynthia Ann Parker. But the Civil War changed life in Springfield. Businesses closed as men joined the Confederate army. After local plantation owner Logan Stroud read the Emancipation Proclamation from the steps of his Bur Oak Springs plantation, racial conflicts and martial law plagued the community during the years of Reconstruction. Springfield found new life as a community of African-American freedmen after the railroad bypassed the town for Mexia and Groesbeck. Today all that remains of Springfield are the springs and the cemetery. Towering trees shade the graves of former Springfield residents including plantation owners, AfricanAmerican freedmen, and early Texas Revolution veterans Sanders Walker and Joseph Penn Lynch. Grave of Logan Stroud’s infant daughter, 1861. CAMP MEXIA With local economies struggling during the Great Depression, Limestone County businessmen sought a Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camp to build a recreational park near the historic site of Parker’s fort. The young men of Civilian Conservation Corps Camp 3807 (C) reported to Camp Mexia in July of 1935. The “C” stood for “Colored,” and 3807 was one of the first se
FORT PARKER SP BIRD CHECKLIST This checklist is a list of common and specialty birds seen in the park. Staf and volunteers have used previous checklists as well as eBird data to compile these lists. This list should not be used as a comprehensive list of birds seen in this park. Please help us protect the natural avian communities by refraining from using playback tapes of bird songs. Thank you for your cooperation. Waterfowl ___ Wood Duck ___ Blue-winged Teal Pelicans ___ American White Pelican Herons, Ibis, and Allies ___ Northern Shoveler ___ Great Blue Heron ___ Gadwall ___ Great Egret ___ American Wigeon ___ Snowy Egret ___ Mallard ___ Cattle Egret ___ Green-winged Teal ___ Green Heron ___ Ring-necked Duck Vultures, Hawks, and Allies ___ Lesser Scaup ___ Black Vulture ___ Ruddy Duck ___ Turkey Vulture Grebes ___ Pied-billed Grebe Pigeons and Doves ___ Mourning Dove Cuckoos ___ Yellow-billed Cuckoo Hummingbirds ___ Ruby-throated Hummingbird Rails, Gallinules, and Allies ___ American Coot Shorebirds ___ Cooper’s Hawk ___ Bald Eagle ___ Red-shouldered Hawk ___ Red-tailed Hawk Owls ___ Great Horned Owl ___ Barred Owl Kingfshers ___ Belted Kingfsher Woodpeckers ___ Yellow-bellied Sapsucker ___ Killdeer ___ Red-headed Woodpecker ___ Spotted Sandpiper ___ Red-bellied Woodpecker Gulls, Terns, and Skimmers ___ Downy Woodpecker ___ Bonaparte’s Gull ___ Ladder-backed Woodpecker ___ Ring-billed Gull ___ Pileated Woodpecker ___ Forster’s Tern ___ Northern Flicker Cormorants and Anhingas Falcons and Caracaras ___ Neotropic Cormorant ___ Crested Caracara ___ Double-crested Cormorant ___ American Kestrel Tyrant Flycatchers: Pewees, Kingbirds, and Allies ___ Eastern Wood-Pewee ___ Eastern Phoebe ___ Great Crested Flycatcher ___ Western Kingbird ___ Eastern Kingbird ___ Scissor-tailed Flycatcher Vireos ___ Hermit Thrush ___ American Robin Waxwings ___ Cedar Waxwing Old World Sparrows ___ House Sparrow Finches, Euphonias, and Allies ___ Pine Siskin ___ American Goldfnch ___ White-eyed Vireo ___ Blue-headed Vireo ___ Red-eyed Vireo Jays, Magpies, Crows, and Ravens ___ Blue Jay ___ American Crow Tits, Chickadees, and Titmice ___ Carolina Chickadee ___ Tufed Titmouse Martins and Swallows ___ Purple Martin ___ Barn Swallow ___ Clif Swallow Kinglets New World Sparrows ___ Chipping Sparrow ___ Field Sparrow ___ Lark Sparrow ___ Dark-eyed Junco ___ White-throated Sparrow ___ Savannah Sparrow ___ Song Sparrow ___ Lincoln’s Sparrow ___ Swamp Sparrow ___ Spotted Towhee Blackbirds ___ Red-winged Blackbird ___ Brown-headed Cowbird ___ Golden-crowned Kinglet ___ Ruby-crowned Kinglet Gnatcatchers ___ Blue-gray Gnatcatcher Wrens ___ Common Grackle ___ Great-tailed Grackle Wood-Warblers ___ Black-and-white Warbler ___ Orange-crowned Warbler ___ Marsh Wren ___ Carolina Wren ___ Bewick’s Wren Starlings and Mynas ___ European Starling Catbirds, Mockingbirds, and Thrashers ___ Northern Mockingbird ___ Nashville Warbler ___ Common Yellowthroat ___ Northern Parula ___ Yellow Warbler ___ Pine Warbler ___ Yellow-rumped Warbler Cardinals, Grosbeaks, and Allies ___ Summer Tanager Thrushes ___ Eastern Bluebird ___ Swainson’s Thrush ___ Northern Cardinal ___ Painted Bunting © 2021 TPWD PWD CD P4503-0034K (5/21) TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041.
-Official- FA C I L I T I E S MAPS Get the Mobile App: ACTIVITIES texasstateparks.org/app Toyota Tundra Let your sense of adventure be your guide with the Toyota Official Vehicle of the Texas Parks & Wildlife Foundation Tundra — built to help you explore all that the great state of Texas has to offer. | toyota.com/trucks BUILT HERE. LIVES HERE. ASSEMBLED IN TEXAS WITH U.S. AND GLOBALLY SOURCED PARTS. Contents 4 6 8 10 Activities and Programs Parks Near You Places to Stay Recreational Vehicles 12 Tips for Time in Nature Ray Roberts Devils River 14 Visitor Fees and Passes Directory TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT 18 Big Bend Country 26 34 48 56 64 80 86 Gulf Coast TPW COMMISSION S. Reed Morian, Chairman Houston Arch “Beaver” Aplin, III, Vice-Chairman Lake Jackson James E. Abell Kilgore Oliver J. Bell Cleveland Anna B. Galo Laredo Jeffery D. Hildebrand Houston Jeanne W. Latimer San Antonio Robert L. “Bobby” Patton, Jr. Fort Worth Dick Scott Wimberley T. Dan Friedkin, Chairman-Emeritus Houston Lee Marshall Bass, Chairman-Emeritus Fort Worth Hill Country Panhandle Plains Pineywoods Prairies and Lakes South Texas Plains Carter P. Smith Executive Director Rodney Franklin State Parks Director Josh Havens Communications Director Facilities and Activities Index 44 State Parks Map Special thanks to Toyota and advertisers, whose generous support made this guide possible. Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Cover photo: Tyler State Park, Chase Fountain Texas State Parks Official Guide, Seventeenth Edition © TPWD PWD BK P4000-000A (5/20) TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. WELCOME from Rodney Franklin, State Parks Director   Texas contains some of the most diverse public lands in the country. There is a wealth of cultural heritage. Wildlife abounds, landscapes flourish with beauty and our history is abundant. Your state parks are a part of the legacy that makes Texas proud. The people of Texas recently helped secure that legacy for future generations by voting yes to Proposition 5. Thank you! These 630,000-plus acres showcase some of our state’s greatest treasures. Parks help people make memories with family and find respite in nature’s playground. They strengthen local economies and bind communities. Most of all, parks enable each of us to spend time outside to recharge, be healthy and relax in our own way. I invite you to enjoy your state parks, exploring the best of Texas with friends and family. The parks are here for you. They belong to you. Please visit, have fun, and help protect them forever! Thank you, Texas! Texans voted to approve passage of Proposition 5 in the November 5, 2019 election. Now 100% of the sporting goods sales tax will go to fund the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and Texas Historical Commission. This funding will help secure the future of local parks, state parks and historic sites for generations to come, all without increasing taxes. We would like to extend our deepest gratitude. See what’s in store for Texas State Parks: texasstateparks.org/better ACTIVITIES & PROGRAMS What is there to do in state parks? Enjoy a family picnic, tour a hallowed historic site or choose from some of these visitor favorites: Bike Pedal across parks at any speed, in any style, with any group. Choose the routes, surfaces and distances that fit your comfort zone. Walk Start with a shorter loop, tackle tougher terrain or join a guided tour. Fish Fish without a license in as many as 70 state parks. Many offer tackle loaner programs and special learnto-fish events. Boat or Paddle Rent canoes and kayaks, explore a Texas Paddling Trail or launch a boat. View Wildlife Discover the birds, mammals and plants that live in Texas. Many parks have signage and checklists to help you learn more about the wildlife around you. 4 Camp Swim Find a site that meets your needs. Test out new recipes, share your favorite stories and enjoy the stars. Beat the heat at creeks, rivers, lakes, springs, pools and ocean beaches. More information & reservations: texasstateparks.org (512) 389-8900 Many state parks offer special guided and self-guided progra
Guía de Parques INSTALACIONES Descarga la Aplicacíon Móvil MAPAS ACTIVIDADES texasstateparks.org/app ¡Los niños entran gratis! La entrada es gratis para los niños de 12 años y menores. Encuentra un parque: parquesdetexas.org Contenido Estero Llano Grande SP 2 4 6 8 9 10 18 Actividades y Programas Parques Cercanos Lugares para Quedarse Tarifas y Pases Directorio Mapa de Parques Instalaciones y Actividades BIENVENIDO Rodney Franklin, Director de Parques Texas tiene algunas de las tierras públicas más diversas del país, con una gran riqueza natural y cultural. La vida silvestre está por todas partes, los paisajes florecen con belleza, y la historia es abundante. Sus parques estatales son parte del legado que nos enorgullece. La gente de Texas ayuda a asegurar ese legado para las generaciones futuras al visitar y ser voluntarios. ¡Gracias! Estos más de 630,000 acres exhiben algunos de los grandes tesoros del estado. Los parques nos ayudan a crear recuerdos con la familia y a encontrar consuelo en la naturaleza. Los parques fortalecen las economías locales y unen a las comunidades. Sobre todo, los parques nos permiten pasar tiempo al aire libre para recargar energías, estar saludables y relajarnos a nuestra manera. Les invito a disfrutar de sus parques estatales, explorando lo mejor de Texas con amigos y familia. Los parques están aquí para todos. Nos pertenecen a todos. ¡Visítelos, diviértase y ayude a protegerlos para siempre! Foto de portada: Estero Llano State Park, Chase Fountain © 2021 TPWD PWD BK P4000-000A (5/21) TPWD recibe fondos del Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU. (USFWS por sus siglas en ingles). TPWD prohíbe la discriminación por raza, color, religión, nacionalidad de origen, discapacidad, edad y género, conforme la ley estatal y federal. Para solicitar un acomodo especial u obtener información en un formato alternativo, por favor contacte a TPWD en un Teléfono de Texto (TTY) al (512) 3898915 ó por medio de “Relay Texas” al 7-1-1 ó (800) 735-2989 ó por email a accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. Si usted cree que TPWD ha discriminado en su contra, favor de comunicarse con TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, o con el Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU., Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. De acuerdo con la Ley de Depósito del Estado de Texas, esta publicación está disponible en el centro de Distribución de Publicaciones del Estado de Texas y/o las Bibliotecas de Depósito de Texas. ACTIVIDADES Y PROGRAMAS ¿Qué puedo hacer en los parques estatales? ¡Disfruta de un día de campo, visita un sitio histórico o elige entre muchas otras opciones! Bicicletas Pedalea a lo largo de los parques a cualquier velocidad, en cualquier estilo, con cualquier grupo. Elige las rutas, el tipo de terreno y las distancias que cumplan con tu zona de confort. Caminatas Empieza con un circuito más corto, avanza a terrenos más difíciles o únete a una caminata guiada. Pescar Puedes pescar sin licencia en tantos como 70 parques estatales. Muchos parques ofrecen equipo para pescar a manera de préstamo y eventos especiales para aprender a pescar. Barcos Renta canoas y kayacs y explora uno de los senderos acuáticos en Texas. Nadar Animales Silvestres Acampar Descubre aves, mamíferos y plantas que tienen su hogar en Texas. Muchos parques tienen señalamientos y listados que te ayudan a aprender más. Encuentra un lugar que cumpla con lo que quieres. Prueba nuevas recetas, comparte historias favoritas y disfruta de las estrellas. 2 Más información y reservaciones: parquesdetexas.org Escape del calor en arroyos, ríos, lagos, manantiales, piletas y playas del mar. Tu seguridad en el agua es muy importante. Lleva el chaleco salvavidas. Aprende a nadar. Guarda a los niños. (512) 389-8900 ¡Pregunta en tu parque cuáles están disponibles! Los niños de 12 años y menores entran GRATIS Cielos Estrellados Escapa de las luces de la ciudad y goza de maravillosas vistas del cielo que no encontrarás en ninguna otra parte. Ven a una fiesta de estrellas o toma una excursión de constelaciones auto-guiada. Familias en la Naturaleza Elige un taller o diseña tu propia aventura. ¡Monta una tienda de campaña, cocina al exterior, prende una fogata y juega al exterior! Nosotros te Toma una publicación gratuita de actividades o pregunta por los paquetes gratuitos con los parques proporcionamos todo el equipo. No es necesario tener experiencia. participantes. Usa los binoculares, lupas, libros de bosquejos y libros de guías para explorar el parque. Mochilas para Exploradores Soldados Búfalo de Texas Descubre la historia con cuentos, vestuarios y herramientas. Sigue la pista de un animal, pesca con caña, cocina sobre una fogata, visita los fuertes y más. Adéntrate en las historias de vida de aquellos que sirvieron valientemente en los primeros regimientos Áfrico-Americanos de las Fuerzas Armadas. ! Seguridad en el Parque Ten cuidado con el agua Pr

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