Hueco Tanks

State Park & Historic Site - Texas

Hueco Tanks is an area of low mountains and historic site in El Paso County, Texas. It is located in a high-altitude desert basin between the Franklin Mountains to the west and the Hueco Mountains to the east. Hueco is a Spanish word meaning hollows and refers to the many water-holding depressions in the boulders and rock faces throughout the region. The park consists of three syenite (a weak form of granite) mountains. It is popular for recreation such as birdwatching and bouldering. It is culturally and spiritually significant to many Native Americans. This significance is partially manifested in the pictographs (rock paintings) that can be found throughout the region, many of which are thousands of years old.

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Official Texas State Parks Guide. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Texas State - Official Texas State Parks Guide

Official Texas State Parks Guide. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Official Texas State Parks Guide (español). Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Texas State - Guía de Parques

Official Texas State Parks Guide (español). Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Hueco Tanks SP&HS https://tpwd.texas.gov/state-parks/hueco-tanks https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hueco_Tanks Hueco Tanks is an area of low mountains and historic site in El Paso County, Texas. It is located in a high-altitude desert basin between the Franklin Mountains to the west and the Hueco Mountains to the east. Hueco is a Spanish word meaning hollows and refers to the many water-holding depressions in the boulders and rock faces throughout the region. The park consists of three syenite (a weak form of granite) mountains. It is popular for recreation such as birdwatching and bouldering. It is culturally and spiritually significant to many Native Americans. This significance is partially manifested in the pictographs (rock paintings) that can be found throughout the region, many of which are thousands of years old.
INTERPRETIVE GUIDE HUECO TANKS At Hueco Tanks, visitors are surrounded by the vestiges of thousands of years of human history and millions of years of natural history. While enjoying your visit: • Stay on trails when hiking to protect habitat and archeology. • Leave pictographs and artifacts untouched. Doing so may help us solve the mysteries of the past. • Respect plants, animals and geologic features, which together form the site’s unique ecosystem and are protected by law. • Properly dispose of or pack out your trash. Recycling containers are located near the Interpretive Center. STATE PARK AND HISTORIC SITE FURTHER READING THE FORMATIONS OF HUECO TANKS STATE HISTORIC SITE RISE ABOVE THE CHIHUAHUAN DESERT FLOOR TO MARK AN OASIS OF NATURE AND CULTURE. DUE TO ITS GEOLOGY, RELATIVELY ABUNDANT WATER, AND UNUSUAL STRUCTURE, HUECO TANKS HAS SERVED AS A REFUGE FOR PLANTS, ANIMALS AND PEOPLE FOR OVER 10,000 YEARS. THOUSANDS OF PICTOGRAPHS LEFT BY PREHISTORIC AND HISTORIC NATIVE AMERICANS ARE TESTA- Kirkland, Forrest and W.W. Newcomb, Jr., The Rock Art of Texas Indians. Austin, University of Texas Press, 1967. Sutherland, Kay, Rock Paintings at Hueco Tanks State Historical Park. Austin, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, 1995. Hueco Tanks holds meaning for diverse groups of visitors. Hiking, picnicking, rockclimbing, camping, interpretive tours, birding and annual special events are among the available activities. The site also continues to be used for traditional Native American cultural activities and performances. Visitors should call ahead to learn more about access policies, activities and volunteer opportunities. For information, contact: Hueco Tanks State Park and Historic Site 6900 Hueco Tanks Road #1, El Paso, Texas 79938 (915) 857-1135 • www.tpwd.texas.gov/huecotanks MENT TO THE LIFE-SUSTAINING Proud Sponsor of Texas Parks and Wildlife Programs © 2018 TPWD. PWD BR P4501-095 (7/18) In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. TPWD POWER OF HUECO TANKS. T A N K S S T A T E P A R K A N D H I S T O R I C S I T E RAINWATER AND ROCK THE JORNADA MOGOLLON The rock we see at Hueco Tanks formed beneath the earth’s surface 34 million years ago, as magma pushed up into an older limestone formation and then cooled. Over millennia, weathering processes eroded the overlying limestone and sculpted the now-exposed igneous rock into its present form. Hollows (huecos) and fracture patterns in the massive granite-like formations capture or direct precious rainfall to establish a relatively moist environment. The rock also provides shelter, shade and pockets of fertile soil to create “microhabitats” that support a diversity of living things. Arizona white oak and rose-fruited juniper, typically found at higher elevations, thrive here. Moisture-seeking cottonwood and willow coexist with desert-adapted creosotebush and mesquite, while huecos and seasonal ponds support freshwater shrimp. The only known U.S. population of Erect Colubrina, a shrub of the buckthorn family, occurs in a protected alcove at Hueco Tanks. With the advent of domesticated crops such as corn, beans and squash, people began to settle more permanently. By 1150 the Jornada Mogollon built a small cluster of pithouse structures at Hueco Tanks. Pottery shards, stone tools, bedrock mortars and prehistoric water control features provide clues about this early agricultural way of life. Animals, birds, and large-eyed figures that may represent rain or storm deities are part of the Jornada Mogollon pictograph style. The most renowned images are pictograph “masks” or face designs scattered throughout the park. Numbering more than 200, they represent the largest assemblage of painted masks in North America. These intriguing images are a direct yet cryptic communication from people of the past. ARCHAIC HUNTERS AND GATHERERS For thousands of years following the end of the Pleistocene ice age approximately 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers traveled across the landscape in pursuit of game. They also gathered wild plants for use as food, fiber and medicine. Today, visitors can still see the hunting scenes and the groups of geometric designs they painted on the rock. HISTORIC PERIOD Even
Hueco Tanks #TxStateParks State Park and Historic Site #BetterOutside @TPWDparks @texasparkswildlife /texasparksandwildlife TexasStateParks.org/App LEGEND Hike and climb at your own risk. Stay on designated trail; do not use switchbacks or cut cross-country. Permit required, see headquarters for details. Gate Headquarters State Parks Store FM 2775 Showers Bikes on designated paved roads only. Access to trails permitted only through main gate at park headquarters. N Restrooms North Mountain Water Only Sites Water and Electric Sites Guided Access Only East Mountain Amphitheater Gate West Mountain SPEED LIMIT North Mountain Maximum Elevation 4800' FM 2775 East Spur 20 Cha in Tr FM 2775 MPH ail Dump Station Recycling Bins Hiking Trail Picnic Area Parking Pictograph Site Campground Ruins Interpretive Center 10 MPH Day use area closes at ____________ Wheelchair Accessible Pet Use Area Guided Access Only en Da m Co nc re te rth Da m Ea Earthe n Dam P.M. Trail Texas State Parks Store T-shirts, caps, books, souvenirs and one-of-a-kind gift items are available at the Texas State Parks Store located in our park headquarters building. Guided Access Only East Mountain 6900 Hueco Tanks Road #1 El Paso, TX 79938 (915) 857-1135 West Mountain TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. © 2019 TPWD PWD MP P4501-095C (2/19) Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. PARK RESERVATIONS TexasStateParks.org ParquesDeTexas.org (512) 389-8911 Proud Sponsor of Texas State Parks
Hueco Tanks State Park Trails Map 68 North Mountain Gate 0' 46 00 Nature ' Trail 0.08 mi. 4600' ' 4600 0.13 ' 50 47 ' 4 ' 00 4780' ' 50 4 0' 475 ' 00 0' 47 0' ' 0 75 455 47 0' 0 46 47 5 0' 4600 LOWER SITE 17 31° 55' 20.934"N 106° 2' 28.762"W An easy trail to Mescalero Apache pictographs and the historic graffiti that damaged them over time. 4 UPPER SITE 17 31° 55' 20.583"N 106° 2' 29.259"W Scramble up the rock to see these well-preserved Jornada Mogollon pictographs. Be careful! The rock can be slick. 5 NORTH MOUNTAIN SUMMIT 31° 55' 17.742"N 106° 2' 51.765"W The highest point on North Mountain at 4820'. Pay close attention to your surroundings, watch your footing, and get ready for spectacular scenery. 6 CAVE KIVA 31° 55' 25.22"N 106° 2' 47.851"W An awe-inspiring rock art site that contains eight Jornada Mogollon masks. A detailed map is available at Headquarters to guide you on your way. 7 LAGUNA PRIETA 31° 55' 29.749"N 106° 2' 46.641"W Mature trees and a seasonal pond make this spot excellent for wildlife viewing and bird watching. You may even see a javelina or an owl! 4550 ' 46 50 ' 4650' ' 1 0.0 0' 465 0.0 3 0' 455 ' 45 50 46 50 ' 00 ' 46 00 ' ' ea Ar 0' 50 465 0' se 47 4600' 4650 46 2 0.0 ' 455 0' 4550' 4650' 455 4750' 45 50 ' 5 46 ' 00 46 4550 tU Pe 0.16 4700' 47 50 ' 4650 ' ' 3 0' 4800' CHAIN TRAILHEAD 31° 55’ 23.977”N 106° 2’ 26.761”W A trail ascending North Mountain to scenic views of El Paso and the surrounding region. 455 2 0.2 46 5 Spur 2 0.04 mi. Pond Trail 0.43 mi. 46 00 ' 46 0 0' 4750' 4600 ' 50 47 2 Site 17 Trail 0.13 mi. 455 ' 4550 4600' 4740' 4750' INTERPRETIVE CENTER 31° 55' 29.328"N 106° 2' 30.006"W Receive site orientation and explore the Escontrias ranch house, which was built in 1896. ea Ar 4780' 0.0 5 3 ' 50 47 2 1 se 0' 0' ' 0 50 0' 46 4 475 4700 ' 4550' ' 50 4500 ' Trails are for hiking only. Pets are allowed in designated areas only. Contour intervals are 10 feet. Trail lengths are in miles. Elevation levels are in feet. Map compiled by Texas State Parks staff. 4750' 47 00 ' 45 50 ' Pictograph 4600 ' ' 00 GUIDED ACCESS ONLY 4750 ' 47 4750' 4700' 0' In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State 4700' 475 No claims are made as to the accuracy of the data nor to its suitability for a particular use. 0.2 Miles (GPS coordinates shown in degrees, minutes, seconds) tU Pe 4 0.1 Chain Trail 0.14 mi. 480 ' Campground Gate 0.1 0' 0.04 50 1,000 Feet POINTS OF INTEREST 3 0.0 North Mountain Spur 3 0.03 mi. 4550' 6 1 0. 08 4600' 4700' 47 0 ' 4550' 465 4600' 0 4600 ' Laguna Prieta Trail 0.15 mi. 00 ' 4550' 46 46 ' 00 45 7 4550 0.36 Picnic Area Trail 0.04 00mi. ' ' 0.13 ' 4550' 4500' 0.21 4550' 4550' 0' 455 4550 4600' 0' 0.1 3 ' 50 0.02 04 0. 50 455 Headquarters Park Store Interpretive Center Restroom Showers Parking Day Use Amphitheater North Campsites with Water Mountain & Electricity Spur 1 Campsites with Water 0.04 mi. Dump Station Private Residence Ruins Pictograph North Dam Mountain 0.04 Park Boundary 450 North Mountain Trail 0.9 mi. LEGEND 0.04 45 45 6900 Hueco Tanks Road No. 1 El Paso, TX 79938 (915) 857-1135 www.texasstateparks.org Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. © 2018 Texas Parks and Wildlife Department PWD MP P4501-0095N (7/18) 0' 0' 5 46 TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. 4700' 4500 ' 465 Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Hueco Tanks State Park Hike through history amidst our spectacular geologic features. People have been drawn to these sacred rocks for thousands of years. Rock basins, called huecos, provide water for wildlife ranging from white-tailed deer to fairy shrimp. Pictographs on the granite-like walls tell stories of the past. Help preserve these stories for future generations and maintain a clean environment for wildlife. STAYING SAFE KNOW YOUR LIMITS. Prepare for sun and heat. Wear sunscreen, insect repellent and appropriate clothing/hiking shoes. TRAIL DISTANCE TIME DIFFICULTY DESCRIPTION NORTH MOUNTAIN TRAIL 0.9 mi. (one way) 45 min. Easy Begin at the Interpretive Center to explore the towering, breathtaking cliffs of North Mountain. LAGUNA PRIETA TRAIL 0.15 mi. (one w
PWD BK P4501-095E Hueco 6/22/06 9:06 AM R O C K Page A P A I N T I N G S AT HUECO TANKS STATE HISTORIC SITE by Kay Sutherland, Ph.D. PWD BK P4501-095E Hueco 6/22/06 9:06 AM Page B Mescalero Apache design, circa 1800 A.D., part of a rock painting depicting white dancing figures. Unless otherwise indicated, the illustrations are photographs of watercolors by Forrest Kirkland, reproduced courtesy of Texas Memorial Museum. The watercolors were photographed by Rod Florence. Editor: Georg Zappler Art Direction: Pris Martin PWD BK P4501-095E Hueco 6/22/06 9:06 AM Page C ROCK PAINTINGS AT H U E C O TA N K S S TAT E H I S T O R I C S I T E by Kay Sutherland, Ph.D. Watercolors by Forrest Kirkland Dedicated to Forrest and Lula Kirkland PWD BK P4501-095E Hueco 6/22/06 9:06 AM Page 1 I N T R O D U C T I O N The rock paintings at Hueco Tanks State Historic Site are the impressive artistic legacy of the different prehistoric peoples who found water, shelter and food at this stone oasis in the desert. Over 3000 paintings depict religious masks, caricature faces, complex geometric designs, dancing figures, people with elaborate headdresses, birds, jaguars, deer and symbols of rain, lightning and corn. Hidden within shelters, crevices and caves among the three massive outcrops of boulders found in the park, the art work is rich in symbolism and is a visual testament to the importance of graphic expression for the people who lived and visited the area. The impressive outdoor art gallery, accumulated over the course of thousands of years, belongs to all of us and is a reminder of our connection to the art of ancient peoples. The oldest rock paintings found here were done by early gatherers and hunters, termed Archaic Indians. Later, an agricultural people (archaeologists call them the “Jornada Mogollon”) lived in small villages or pueblos at and near Hueco Tanks and painted on the rock-shelter walls. Still later, the Mescalero Apaches and possibly other Plains Indian groups painted pictures of their rituals and depicted their contact with Spaniards, Mexicans and Anglos. The European newcomers and settlers left no pictures, but some chose instead to record their names with dates on the rock walls, perhaps as a sign of the importance of the individual in western cultures. Hueco Tanks is no ordinary stopping place. The niches, shelters and caves were places of religious ceremony for Native Americans, from remote prehistoric times until the late 19th century. The Indians filled the hidden and secret places with sacred paintings representing their beliefs and the world around them. Walking among the rocks, climbing the boulders or discovering a hidden niche is the best way to understand what the ancient Indians felt when they 1 PWD BK P4501-095E Hueco 6/22/06 9:06 AM Page 2 came to Hueco Tanks – a place to which their descendants still come to perform religious ceremonies. Hueco Tanks is a distinctive and striking remnant of a dome of uplifted molten rock (technically called syenite) that cooled about 30 million years ago before it ever reached the surface. Weathering and erosion exposed and sculpted the present rock masses which, as a result, are heavily fractured and recessed with hollows that trap and contain water, attracting animals and humans. These hollows are called “huecos” in Spanish, hence the name Hueco Tanks. Because of available water, stands of juniper and oak, widespread at the end of the last Ice Age, survive here as small relict populations. The surrounding desert, before modernization and overgrazing, was a semi-arid grassland inviting to deer and antelopes. Humans have been coming here for close to 11,000 years, drawn above all else by the water, along with animals to hunt and plants to use. Overview of Hueco Tanks. Rising precipitously to a maximum height of almost 450 feet above the surrounding desert floor, three massive outthrusts form a sacred trinity of cathedrals beckoning the desert pilgrim. A water-filled hueco. Over thirty million years ago, molten rocks from an underground volcano almost, but not quite, came to the surface. Weathering and erosion exposed and sculpted the present fractured and hollowed-out rock masses. The depressions became the water-filled “huecos” (Spanish for “hollows”) for which the site is named. (Photo by Anna Toness Blubaugh) 2 PWD BK P4501-095E Hueco 6/22/06 9:06 AM Page 3 T E C H N I C A L A N D H I S T O R I C A L B A C K G R O U N D Two important terms: Pictograph – an ancient painting or drawing on a rock wall, usually within a shelter. Colors used at Hueco Tanks are often red, black, yellow and white, and sometimes green and blue. yolk, plant juices and animal fats. Paints were applied with brushes made from yucca or human hair, or by blowing pigments from reed or bone tubes; finger painting was also employed. Petroglyph – a carving etched or pecked on a rock surface that is usually weathered or patinated later, creating a co
TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE BIRDS OF HUECO TANKS STATE PARK AND HISTORIC SITE A FIELD CHECKLIST 2002 TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE BIRDS OF HUECO TANKS STATE PARK AND HISTORIC SITE A FIELD CHECKLIST 2002 Cover: Illustration of Cliff Swallows by Clemente Guzman. INTRODUCTION O n first inspection, Hueco Tanks State Historic Site may appear to be a poor spot to study birds; however, the birder who takes a closer look will find that the site supports an amazingly diverse avifauna. The core of the site is a line of syenite (a granite-like rock) outcrops dissected by numerous canyons and washes. The entire site is surrounded by Chihuahuan Desert Scrub vegetation dominated by creosote bush. In favorable sites, the desert harbors a remnant grassland-yucca association, and after the mid and late summer rains the entire desert may be carpeted with a lush growth of seasonal grasses and wildflowers. On hilly slopes and in certain canyons numerous small trees and shrubs are found. Among these are hackberry, Texas mulberry, Mexican buckeye, Gregg acacia, juniper and numerous Arizona oaks. Several small stock ponds, or tanks, are scattered throughout the site. A few are dry much of the year, but most contain some water during the winter. In addition, there are several seasonal and permanent springs, seeps and huecos or tinajas, located among the rocks. The combination of trees, water and sheltering rocks act as a powerful magnet drawing birds to the site. In a desert environment water means life; nowhere is this better illustrated than at Hueco Tanks. Besides concentrating the regular birds of the area, the trees and seasonal ponds on the site stand out as a beacon to migrants looking for a resting place. This oasis effect has made the site one of the best traps for migrant avifauna in West Texas, as evidenced by the number of rare birds found here. A total of 222 species have been documented as occurring on the site. Because we will be updating this checklist as additional observations are made, we ask that you report details of new or unusual sightings on Bird Sighting Report forms available at the site headquarters. Reports may be sent to the Natural 1 Resources Program, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, Texas 78744 or may be left at site headquarters for forwarding. Nomenclature and organization for this checklist follow the A.O.U. Check-list of North American Birds (7th edition, 1998) as currently supplemented. This checklist has been compiled by Barry R. Zimmer of El Paso. The compiler gratefully acknowledges the cooperation of the many dedicated contributors who assisted in the preparation of this checklist. Please help protect the natural avian communities in our parks by refraining from using playback tapes of bird songs. Frequent use of these tapes disrupts normal avian activity patterns, disrupts essential territorial behavior and may lead to nest failure. Thank you for your cooperation. 2 LEGEND Sp – S – F – W– Seasons Spring (March – May) Summer (June – August) Fall (September – November) Winter (December – February) Abundance A = abundant – should be seen on every trip in proper habitat and season C = common – should be seen on 3 out 4 trips in proper habitat and season FC = fairly common – should be seen on 2 out 4 trips in proper habitat and season U = uncommon – should be seen on 1 out 4 trips in proper habitat and season R = rare – should be seen on 1 out 10 trips in proper habitat and season Ca = casual – 3 to 5 records in last 5 years X = accidental – only one or two records in the past 5 years I = irregular – absent some years, but may be numerous in others / = when preceding summer status, indicates that the bird’s presence in summer is due to early southbound migrants * = confirmed breeding # = suspected breeding 3 CHECKLIST Sp S ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ F Pied-billed Grebe............................................. Ca Ca Eared Grebe...................................................... X X Western Grebe................................................. X Great Blue Heron............................................ X X Cattle Egret....................................................... X Green Heron ................................................... X X *Turkey Vulture............................................... A A C Tundra Swan.................................................... Wood Duck....................................................... X Gadwall............................................................. R R American Wigeon............................................ R R Mallard............................................................... R R Mallard (Mexican race)................................... R R Blue-winged Teal............................................. R R Cinnamon Teal.................................................
Hueco Tanks STATE PARK AND HISTORIC SITE JUNIOR RANGER PROGRAM Hueco Tanks State Park and Historic Site Junior Ranger Program Recommended for ages 5 to 13 Welcome to Hueco Tanks State Park and Historic Site. We are glad you have taken the time to visit us and hope you enjoy your tour of this very special place. The Junior Ranger Program is specially designed for people like you. Part of your job will be to help take care of our Texas State Parks and to tell other people to take care of them, too. The parks belong to all of us and we want you to be able to bring your children here someday. Start your adventure of becoming a Junior Ranger by going through the Interpretive Center exhibits. Be sure to watch the orientation video because it will help with some of the questions. On your trip, you will hike and learn about pictographs. You will also learn to identify plants and animals. As you tour the site keep your booklet with you. You never know when you might find an answer. The challenge for you is to complete as many of the activities as possible, but you must complete at least six to be considered a Junior Ranger. If you need any help, just ask your parents or ask a ranger for assistance. When finished, take your booklet to a ranger in the Headquarters building or at the Interpretive Center. Be prepared to answer any questions that the ranger may ask. Once finished, you will receive a certificate of completion and a patch. JUNIOR RANGER PROMISE As a Junior Ranger, I promise to: Assist in making Hueco Tanks State Park and Historic Site and other parks better for those who visit after me. Protect all cultural and natural resources on public lands and in the world around me. Learn more about parks and similar areas including their cultures, plants, animals and historic features. Share with others what I have learned about these special places. Signed: Fun Fact: There are 15 species of lichen at Hueco Tanks. What is lichen? Ask a ranger. Hueco Tanks SP&HS Junior Ranger Program 1 People come to Hueco Tanks from all over the United States and the world. 1. Circle and name your home state or country. ______________________________________________________________________________ 2. Trace your travels from your home to Hueco Tanks State Park and Historic Site. 3. What has been the most fun during your travel? ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ 4. What is a park or historic site close to your home? ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Fun Fact: 2 There are over 270 rock art sites at Hueco Tanks. Hueco Tanks SP&HS Junior Ranger Program Coloring Activity Using the crayons in the Interpretive Center, color the following to the best of your ability. Stagecoach Jornada Mogollon Native Americans Fun Fact: A type of stagecoach that came through Hueco Tanks was the “mud wagon.” Hueco Tanks SP&HS Junior Ranger Program 3 Safety Activity Match each sentence to “DO” or “DON’T DO.” Hint: The drawings will guide you. Bring a hat. Bring water. Throw rocks. Touch pictographs. Put on sunscreen. DO Have fun. DON’T DO Hike alone. Follow trails. Take rocks or other objects. Leave trash. Fun Fact: 4 The dark coating on rocks at Hueco Tanks is called patina. Hueco Tanks SP&HS Junior Ranger Program Interpretive Center Activity Hueco Tanks is a crossroads in time. For thousands of years the water in the huecos has allowed both plants and animals to live here, in the middle of a desert. Ancient people who passed through here hunted bison and other animals. Then, as many centuries passed, Native American groups came to Hueco Tanks and painted their stories on these rocks. The Butterfield Stagecoach route passed through Hueco Tanks on the way to deliver mail between the east and west. Later on, the Escontrias family ranched here. Today, we come to Hueco Tanks to learn about other cultures and to have fun! Complete all questions. If you need help, ask a ranger. � Find the Escontrias Ranch House. How old is it? ______ years old. Silverio’s wife was _____________ Escontrias. She had _____ children. � Watch the orientation video. Hueco means _____________. Name the three mountains here: _______________, _______________ and _______________. � Find an artifact like this, called a ____________ point. � Locate a puma skull. Pumas eat ______________. � See a grinding stone? These were used to grind ___________. Name four other artifacts from the Interpretive Center. 1. __________________ 2. __________________ 3. __________________ 4. __________________ You found the ______________________ and ____________________
-Official- FA C I L I T I E S MAPS Get the Mobile App: ACTIVITIES texasstateparks.org/app Toyota Tundra Let your sense of adventure be your guide with the Toyota Official Vehicle of the Texas Parks & Wildlife Foundation Tundra — built to help you explore all that the great state of Texas has to offer. | toyota.com/trucks BUILT HERE. LIVES HERE. ASSEMBLED IN TEXAS WITH U.S. AND GLOBALLY SOURCED PARTS. Contents 4 6 8 10 Activities and Programs Parks Near You Places to Stay Recreational Vehicles 12 Tips for Time in Nature Ray Roberts Devils River 14 Visitor Fees and Passes Directory TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT 18 Big Bend Country 26 34 48 56 64 80 86 Gulf Coast TPW COMMISSION S. Reed Morian, Chairman Houston Arch “Beaver” Aplin, III, Vice-Chairman Lake Jackson James E. Abell Kilgore Oliver J. Bell Cleveland Anna B. Galo Laredo Jeffery D. Hildebrand Houston Jeanne W. Latimer San Antonio Robert L. “Bobby” Patton, Jr. Fort Worth Dick Scott Wimberley T. Dan Friedkin, Chairman-Emeritus Houston Lee Marshall Bass, Chairman-Emeritus Fort Worth Hill Country Panhandle Plains Pineywoods Prairies and Lakes South Texas Plains Carter P. Smith Executive Director Rodney Franklin State Parks Director Josh Havens Communications Director Facilities and Activities Index 44 State Parks Map Special thanks to Toyota and advertisers, whose generous support made this guide possible. Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Cover photo: Tyler State Park, Chase Fountain Texas State Parks Official Guide, Seventeenth Edition © TPWD PWD BK P4000-000A (5/20) TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. WELCOME from Rodney Franklin, State Parks Director   Texas contains some of the most diverse public lands in the country. There is a wealth of cultural heritage. Wildlife abounds, landscapes flourish with beauty and our history is abundant. Your state parks are a part of the legacy that makes Texas proud. The people of Texas recently helped secure that legacy for future generations by voting yes to Proposition 5. Thank you! These 630,000-plus acres showcase some of our state’s greatest treasures. Parks help people make memories with family and find respite in nature’s playground. They strengthen local economies and bind communities. Most of all, parks enable each of us to spend time outside to recharge, be healthy and relax in our own way. I invite you to enjoy your state parks, exploring the best of Texas with friends and family. The parks are here for you. They belong to you. Please visit, have fun, and help protect them forever! Thank you, Texas! Texans voted to approve passage of Proposition 5 in the November 5, 2019 election. Now 100% of the sporting goods sales tax will go to fund the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and Texas Historical Commission. This funding will help secure the future of local parks, state parks and historic sites for generations to come, all without increasing taxes. We would like to extend our deepest gratitude. See what’s in store for Texas State Parks: texasstateparks.org/better ACTIVITIES & PROGRAMS What is there to do in state parks? Enjoy a family picnic, tour a hallowed historic site or choose from some of these visitor favorites: Bike Pedal across parks at any speed, in any style, with any group. Choose the routes, surfaces and distances that fit your comfort zone. Walk Start with a shorter loop, tackle tougher terrain or join a guided tour. Fish Fish without a license in as many as 70 state parks. Many offer tackle loaner programs and special learnto-fish events. Boat or Paddle Rent canoes and kayaks, explore a Texas Paddling Trail or launch a boat. View Wildlife Discover the birds, mammals and plants that live in Texas. Many parks have signage and checklists to help you learn more about the wildlife around you. 4 Camp Swim Find a site that meets your needs. Test out new recipes, share your favorite stories and enjoy the stars. Beat the heat at creeks, rivers, lakes, springs, pools and ocean beaches. More information & reservations: texasstateparks.org (512) 389-8900 Many state parks offer special guided and self-guided progra
Guía de Parques INSTALACIONES Descarga la Aplicacíon Móvil MAPAS ACTIVIDADES texasstateparks.org/app ¡Los niños entran gratis! La entrada es gratis para los niños de 12 años y menores. Encuentra un parque: parquesdetexas.org Contenido Estero Llano Grande SP 2 4 6 8 9 10 18 Actividades y Programas Parques Cercanos Lugares para Quedarse Tarifas y Pases Directorio Mapa de Parques Instalaciones y Actividades BIENVENIDO Rodney Franklin, Director de Parques Texas tiene algunas de las tierras públicas más diversas del país, con una gran riqueza natural y cultural. La vida silvestre está por todas partes, los paisajes florecen con belleza, y la historia es abundante. Sus parques estatales son parte del legado que nos enorgullece. La gente de Texas ayuda a asegurar ese legado para las generaciones futuras al visitar y ser voluntarios. ¡Gracias! Estos más de 630,000 acres exhiben algunos de los grandes tesoros del estado. Los parques nos ayudan a crear recuerdos con la familia y a encontrar consuelo en la naturaleza. Los parques fortalecen las economías locales y unen a las comunidades. Sobre todo, los parques nos permiten pasar tiempo al aire libre para recargar energías, estar saludables y relajarnos a nuestra manera. Les invito a disfrutar de sus parques estatales, explorando lo mejor de Texas con amigos y familia. Los parques están aquí para todos. Nos pertenecen a todos. ¡Visítelos, diviértase y ayude a protegerlos para siempre! Foto de portada: Estero Llano State Park, Chase Fountain © 2021 TPWD PWD BK P4000-000A (5/21) TPWD recibe fondos del Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU. (USFWS por sus siglas en ingles). TPWD prohíbe la discriminación por raza, color, religión, nacionalidad de origen, discapacidad, edad y género, conforme la ley estatal y federal. Para solicitar un acomodo especial u obtener información en un formato alternativo, por favor contacte a TPWD en un Teléfono de Texto (TTY) al (512) 3898915 ó por medio de “Relay Texas” al 7-1-1 ó (800) 735-2989 ó por email a accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. Si usted cree que TPWD ha discriminado en su contra, favor de comunicarse con TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, o con el Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU., Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. De acuerdo con la Ley de Depósito del Estado de Texas, esta publicación está disponible en el centro de Distribución de Publicaciones del Estado de Texas y/o las Bibliotecas de Depósito de Texas. ACTIVIDADES Y PROGRAMAS ¿Qué puedo hacer en los parques estatales? ¡Disfruta de un día de campo, visita un sitio histórico o elige entre muchas otras opciones! Bicicletas Pedalea a lo largo de los parques a cualquier velocidad, en cualquier estilo, con cualquier grupo. Elige las rutas, el tipo de terreno y las distancias que cumplan con tu zona de confort. Caminatas Empieza con un circuito más corto, avanza a terrenos más difíciles o únete a una caminata guiada. Pescar Puedes pescar sin licencia en tantos como 70 parques estatales. Muchos parques ofrecen equipo para pescar a manera de préstamo y eventos especiales para aprender a pescar. Barcos Renta canoas y kayacs y explora uno de los senderos acuáticos en Texas. Nadar Animales Silvestres Acampar Descubre aves, mamíferos y plantas que tienen su hogar en Texas. Muchos parques tienen señalamientos y listados que te ayudan a aprender más. Encuentra un lugar que cumpla con lo que quieres. Prueba nuevas recetas, comparte historias favoritas y disfruta de las estrellas. 2 Más información y reservaciones: parquesdetexas.org Escape del calor en arroyos, ríos, lagos, manantiales, piletas y playas del mar. Tu seguridad en el agua es muy importante. Lleva el chaleco salvavidas. Aprende a nadar. Guarda a los niños. (512) 389-8900 ¡Pregunta en tu parque cuáles están disponibles! Los niños de 12 años y menores entran GRATIS Cielos Estrellados Escapa de las luces de la ciudad y goza de maravillosas vistas del cielo que no encontrarás en ninguna otra parte. Ven a una fiesta de estrellas o toma una excursión de constelaciones auto-guiada. Familias en la Naturaleza Elige un taller o diseña tu propia aventura. ¡Monta una tienda de campaña, cocina al exterior, prende una fogata y juega al exterior! Nosotros te Toma una publicación gratuita de actividades o pregunta por los paquetes gratuitos con los parques proporcionamos todo el equipo. No es necesario tener experiencia. participantes. Usa los binoculares, lupas, libros de bosquejos y libros de guías para explorar el parque. Mochilas para Exploradores Soldados Búfalo de Texas Descubre la historia con cuentos, vestuarios y herramientas. Sigue la pista de un animal, pesca con caña, cocina sobre una fogata, visita los fuertes y más. Adéntrate en las historias de vida de aquellos que sirvieron valientemente en los primeros regimientos Áfrico-Americanos de las Fuerzas Armadas. ! Seguridad en el Parque Ten cuidado con el agua Pr

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