Lost Maples

State Natural Area - Texas

Lost Maples State Natural Area is a large, pristine area of beautiful hills and canyons on the upper Sabinal River in the Edwards Plateau Region of Texas. It is designated a Natural Area, rather than a State Park, which means the primary focus is the maintenance and protection of the property's natural state. Accordingly, access and recreational activities may be restricted if the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department (TPWD) deems such action necessary to protect the environment.

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Official Texas State Parks Guide. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Texas State - Official Texas State Parks Guide

Official Texas State Parks Guide. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Official Texas State Parks Guide (español). Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Texas State - Guía de Parques

Official Texas State Parks Guide (español). Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Lost Maples SNA https://tpwd.texas.gov/state-parks/lost-maples https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lost_Maples_State_Natural_Area Lost Maples State Natural Area is a large, pristine area of beautiful hills and canyons on the upper Sabinal River in the Edwards Plateau Region of Texas. It is designated a Natural Area, rather than a State Park, which means the primary focus is the maintenance and protection of the property's natural state. Accordingly, access and recreational activities may be restricted if the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department (TPWD) deems such action necessary to protect the environment.
Lost Maples #TxStateParks State Natural Area oun park b y Lan e A Hale H B oundar ol l Spring We st L oop Trail East G Trail Headquarters Showers Ea st Tra il FLASH FLOODS are common in this area. In case of heavy rain, move to higher ground and DO NOT cross swollen streams. Composting Toilet Primitive Camping Sites Water and Electric Sites k H Hiking Trail l Maple Trai Service Road We s t Tr a i l Myst ic C anyon Dump Station il Ponds S t Tra Eas ee n Picnic Area Park Boun dary Cr i ab East Trail n Stee p Ca al Ri 2,200 Elevation ek ver Steep Spring Cre Restrooms k o w Cree Ste Park B spas No Tre dary - ep utside rty o prope Parking Scenic Overlook Interpretive Center F il y oundar p D Bird Viewing Blind East T rail st Trail We e W Ste Park B ep a Tr st Stee Wheelchair Accessible y oundar Residence Park B N E rk Pa • • • • • • West Trail – 4.9 mi. WALK ON DESIGNATED TRAILS ONLY. Do not climb on cliffs or hillsides. Camp in designated areas only — A through H. FIRES PROHIBITED IN THE BACK COUNTRY. Cook only with contained fuel stoves. Pack out what you pack in. Keep noise to a minimum. Park quiet hours are 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. Pets allowed on leash only. TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. East Trail – 4.6 mi. r KEEP IT SAFE. Portions of hiking trails are steep and rugged. Take plenty of water and please consider your physical ability, trail and weather conditions before hiking. CONSULT PARK PERSONNEL FOR ADVICE ON TRAIL USE. Maple Trail – .8 mi. ive TRAIL & PRIMITIVE CAMP USE Maintenance Hiking Trails (Round-trip) al R Sabin ry da un Bo PLEASE NOTE © 2019 TPWD PWD MP P4507-074B (2/19) TexasStateParks.org/App @TPWDparks LEGEND sing Private Steep @texasparkswildlife /texasparksandwildlife Park closes at 10 p.m. except to overnight guests. 2,075 Elevation #BetterOutside West Loop Trail – 2.5 mi. RM PARK RESERVATIONS TexasStateParks.org ParquesDeTexas.org (512) 389-8900 7 18 37221 F.M. 187 Vanderpool, TX 78885 (830) 966-3413 Proud Sponsor of Texas State Parks
2250' 2307' ' 00 22 Lost Maples State Natural Area Trails Map 2294' 2310' 2300' 2268' 2300 ' 37221 FM 187 Vanderpool, TX 78885 (830) 966-3413 www.texasstateparks.org 23 2272' 2218' 2298' 21 00 ' 2285' 2308' ' 00 23 ' 00 23 2267' 1945' Black-capped Vireo 2294' 2285' Park Boundary Steep Steep 6 0.54 Primitive Campsite G Primitive Campsite B 5 Primitive Campsite A 2 2256' 1878' p 0.22 2287' St ee 2200' West Loop Trail 2.37 mi. 2242' 1.11 0.8 1 0.35 Primitive Campsite C West Trail 3.57 mi. 2284' Mystic Canyon Primitive Campsite F Primitive Campsite D 23 00 ' 2223' 23 00 ' 2200 ' 2000' To Hwy 39 2200' NOTES: Park Entrance 2125' 00 ' 1780' 187 2000' To Vanderpool 2200' 1776' All trails are hiking and biking for 2000' the first 1 mile after which all trails 0' 210 are hiking only. 22 00 ' 0' 200 0' 1900' 0' SPRING 29° 49' 56.5" N 99° 36' 16" W As though appearing from nowhere, this spring is one of several life-sustaining springs at Lost Maples State Natural Area. 20 0 2141' 210 SPRING 29° 49' 51.11" N 99° 35'38.45" W Enjoy a break on the West Trail as you listen to the soothing trickle of the spring. 2225' Headquarters Restrooms Parking 2200' 22 Wildlife Viewing 00 ' Scenic Overlook Day Use Area 2235' Dump Station Full Hookups Primitive Tent Camping Composting Toilet 2200' SCENIC OVERLOOK 29° 49' 38.94" N 99° 35' 0.8 W Get a 2272' "bird's eye" view of the East and West trails. Listen for the raven's croak-like call, and look for soaring vultures and zone-tailed hawks as you enjoy the view for miles around. 21 Sabinal River LEGEND 2262' 2214' SCENIC OVERLOOK 2200' 29° 49' 18.49" N 99° 34' 43.18" W Detour 1/3 mile one-way to discover views of the Sabinal River valley below. ' 00 Trail to Day Use Area .07 mi. 21 0' 220 GROTTO 29° 49' 52.49" N 99° 34' 27.01" W Enjoy the peaceful setting and cooler temperatures of this geologic wonder. Listen for the water that supports the growth of maidenhair ferns and other plants. 6 1900' 2265' 2 5 ' 00 22 0.09 2236' MONKEY ROCK 29° 49' 43.37" N 99° 34' 10.63" W You'll have no trouble spotting the unique limestone outcrop fondly nicknamed "monkey rock". Look for the plants growing on the cliff walls, supported by water that seeps from underground. 4 0.34 0.22 Park Boundary 1 3 Maple Trail .36 mi. 1.47 Steep (GPS coordinates shown in degrees, minutes, seconds) ' 2100 0.36 3 0.11 POINTS OF INTEREST 0' ' 2000 0.35 2298' 2300' 2258' 0.78 0.15 East Trail 3.08 mi. East-West Trail 1 mi. 0.46 Stee p Primitive Campsite E 0.93 0.57 ' 2100 1782' 1800' 1729' 210 0' 00 ' 0.88 22 00 ' 0' 4 18 Primitive Campsite H Steep 1.29 Contour intervals are 20 feet. Trail lengths are in miles. Elevation levels are in feet. No claims are made to the accuracy of the data or its suitability to a particular use. Map compiled by Texas State Parks staff. In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. 0 SCALE IN MILES 0.5 1 © 2016 Texas Parks and Wildlife Department PWD MP P4507-0074G (7/16) TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. Lost Maples State Natural Area Discover beauty along the river, prairie and woodlands. Known for its showy bigtooth maple trees, Lost Maples State Natural Area offers several miles of rugged hiking trails through a quiet area of sheltered canyons, spectacular views and scenic woodlands. Find a diversity of plants and wildlife as you explore this beautiful area. FOR EMERGENCIES, PLEASE CALL 9-1-1. TRAIL DIST TIME DIFFICULTY DESCRIPTION MAPLE TRAIL .36 mi. 20 min. Easy This short hike showcases a large stand of relict bigtooth maple trees. See if you can figure out how the bigtooth maple earned its name. EAST-WEST TRAIL 1 mi. 45 min. Easy Take a hike along one of the tributaries of the Sabinal River. Enjoy the shaded spots and beautiful trees, and consider which trail you may take if you lengthen your hike - West or East. EAST TRAIL 3.08 mi. 3 hrs. Challenging Discover bigtooth maples, bald cypress and sycamore trees along the spring-fed Sabinal River. As you transition upward on the rocky slopes, you’ll be rewarded with scenic views and spectacular rock faces. There are a couple of steep areas, so be prepared with plenty of water and good hiking shoes. WEST TRAIL 3.57 mi.
INTERPRETIVE GUIDE THANK YOU FOR VISITING! FALL FOLIAGE, LOST MAPLES While enjoying this natural beauty, please remember everything you see in the natural area is protected. Artifacts, rocks, animals, and plants (even maple leaves) are all part of the region’s rich natural and cultural heritage. Help us keep the natural area a special place for everyone. STATE NATURAL AREA Hike only on designated trails and stay out of closed areas. HOLDS MORE THAN MAPLE Leave no trace. Keep your natural area clean by picking up your trash. KNOWN FOR ITS STRIKING TREES. RUGGED AND ROCKY TRAILS LEAD TO SWEEPING VISTAS, SHADY CANYONS, AND TRICKLING STREAMS. Preserve the natural area for future generations and leave plants, animals, and fossils where you find them. Get involved by joining the Friends of Lost Maples State Natural Area, a volunteer organization committed to the preservation, protection, and improvement of the natural area. QUIET CAMPSITES, FOR CAMPING OR BACKPACKING, PROVIDE PLACES TO RECHARGE. YOU CAN EXPLORE Lost Maples State Natural Area 37221 FM 187 Vanderpool, TX 78885 (830) 966-3413 www.tpwd.texas.gov/lostmaples/ THOUSANDS OF ACRES OF WILDERNESS AT THIS HILL COUNTRY TREASURE. Proud Sponsor of Texas Parks and Wildlife Programs © 2018 TPWD. PWD BR P4507-074H (7/18) In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. LOST MAPLES STATE NATURAL AREA L O S T M A P L E S S T A T E N A T U R A L Chemical changes in the leaves make for a spectacular show. CHANGING BEAUTY Autumn’s magic has its roots in summer. In warmer months, each bigtooth maple leaf acts as a miniature factory. A leaf turns sunlight into sugar, giving the tree energy to live and grow. The shorter days and cooler air of early fall signal a change, like the whistle at the end of a workday. At that time, the leaves halt their production of sugar. Chemical changes within each leaf bring new colors to the canyons. Reds, oranges, yellows, and browns emerge and replace greenery by November. The hue of each tree depends on the season’s temperature. An early frost can curtail the year’s display. With their bright red foliage, bigtooth maples are the natural area’s most celebrated resident. Other trees offer a show, too. The hand-sized leaves of sycamore trees turn golden in the fall. The deep green leaves and cinnamon bark of the Texas madrone offer an eye-catching contrast. After the burst of color in the fall, the canyons quiet with winter. Last year’s leaves line the ground. They’ll become next year’s fertilizer, nourishing new sycamores, maples and madrones in springtime. Texas madrone A R E A SURVIVING AND THRIVING IN THE HILL COUNTRY MORE THAN MAPLES Recent settlers and scientists were not the first to see a bigtooth maple or a Lacey oak. These trees, and many other plants, supported prehistoric people long before ranches, parks, and towns were here. While we don’t know the ancient names for many plants and animals, we do know that early people relied on them to survive. iscover a different landscape up on the hilltops. Up there, tall grasses and small clusters of trees dot the land. One of these plateau dwellers is the Lacey oak, named not for delicate leaves but for a Hill Country naturalist, Howard Lacey. Look around and consider what it would take to make a life here. Could you gather enough food, water and shelter to live? For thousands of years, people did just that in these canyons and plateaus. Fresh water, food, and good stone for tool making drew prehistoric people here starting around 10,000 years ago. They stayed here temporarily, and moved when seasons or food sources changed. In the fall, they may have eaten the madrone tree’s small, orange-red fruit—if they beat the birds to it! The nearconstant flow of the Sabinal River, a comfort in warmer months, provided water. Some groups built large earth ovens with rocks and dirt to cook fiber-rich plants. They roasted leaves or roots for up to two days, softening them enough to eat. The remains of these ovens, known as burned rock middens, now look like piles of scorched rock hidden among thick brush. The canyons and plateaus here looked different to prehistoric people. Many native plants we see today, like Ash
TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE BIRDS OF LOST MAPLES STATE NATURAL AREA A FIELD CHECKLIST 2002 TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE BIRDS OF LOST MAPLES STATE NATURAL AREA A FIELD CHECKLIST 2002 Cover: Illustration of Green Kingfisher by Rob Fleming. Cover: Illustration of Green Kingfisher by Rob Fleming. INTRODUCTION L ost Maples is situated in an area of great biological diversity and species richness. The deeply incised, moist canyons of the Balcones Escarpment harbor some of Texas’ most treasured botanical resources, among which are the well-known Bigtooth Maples (Acer grandidentatum). Surprisingly, the park contains numerous species of plants as well as animals of eastern affinity; these are complemented by biota of western, primarily Mexican, affinity. In addition, the park shelters numerous rare species which are endemic to the Balcones Escarpment zone or at least in Texas are restricted to this zone. The park’s birdlife clearly illustrates the diversity and mixing of biota; the Golden-cheeked Warbler and to a lesser extent the Black-capped Vireo are endemic to the area, while the Green Kingfisher and Zone-tailed Hawk are of western or Mexican affinity. Species with eastern affinity are conspicuous by their abundance and are familiar to us all. The park can be separated into three major habitat types: grasslands and scrublands; mixed evergreen and deciduous escarpment woodlands; and floodplain and streamside woodlands. Of all habitat types the floodplain woodlands harbor the greatest variety of birdlife, but because of the canyon landscape and juxtaposition of habitat types, the birding opportunities are great throughout the park. All habitats in the park are easily accessible by trails. This checklist, compiled by Roy Heideman, is based on observations by numerous individuals, and includes those species which have been observed within or passing over the park. Because we will be updating this checklist as additional observations are made, we ask that you report details of new or unusual sightings on Bird Sighting Report forms available at the park headquarters. Reports may be sent to the Natural Resources Program, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, Texas 78744 or may be left at park headquarters for forwarding. 1 INTRODUCTION L ost Maples is situated in an area of great biological diversity and species richness. The deeply incised, moist canyons of the Balcones Escarpment harbor some of Texas’ most treasured botanical resources, among which are the well-known Bigtooth Maples (Acer grandidentatum). Surprisingly, the park contains numerous species of plants as well as animals of eastern affinity; these are complemented by biota of western, primarily Mexican, affinity. In addition, the park shelters numerous rare species which are endemic to the Balcones Escarpment zone or at least in Texas are restricted to this zone. The park’s birdlife clearly illustrates the diversity and mixing of biota; the Golden-cheeked Warbler and to a lesser extent the Black-capped Vireo are endemic to the area, while the Green Kingfisher and Zone-tailed Hawk are of western or Mexican affinity. Species with eastern affinity are conspicuous by their abundance and are familiar to us all. The park can be separated into three major habitat types: grasslands and scrublands; mixed evergreen and deciduous escarpment woodlands; and floodplain and streamside woodlands. Of all habitat types the floodplain woodlands harbor the greatest variety of birdlife, but because of the canyon landscape and juxtaposition of habitat types, the birding opportunities are great throughout the park. All habitats in the park are easily accessible by trails. This checklist, compiled by Roy Heideman, is based on observations by numerous individuals, and includes those species which have been observed within or passing over the park. Because we will be updating this checklist as additional observations are made, we ask that you report details of new or unusual sightings on Bird Sighting Report forms available at the park headquarters. Reports may be sent to the Natural Resources Program, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, Texas 78744 or may be left at park headquarters for forwarding. 1 Nomenclature and organization for this checklist follow the A.O.U. Check-list of North American Birds, 7th edition, 1998 as currently supplemented. Please help protect the natural avian communities in our parks by refraining from using playback tapes of bird songs. Frequent use of these tapes disrupts normal avian activity patterns, disrupts essential territorial behavior and may lead to nest failure. Thank you for your cooperation. LEGEND Sp– S – F – W– Seasons Spring (March – May) Summer (June – August) Fall (September – November) Winter (December – February) Abundance a = abundant — should be seen on 75% or more of trips in proper habitat and season c = common — should be seen on 50% or more of trips in proper habitat and season u = uncommon — should be seen on 25% or
-Official- FA C I L I T I E S MAPS Get the Mobile App: ACTIVITIES texasstateparks.org/app Toyota Tundra Let your sense of adventure be your guide with the Toyota Official Vehicle of the Texas Parks & Wildlife Foundation Tundra — built to help you explore all that the great state of Texas has to offer. | toyota.com/trucks BUILT HERE. LIVES HERE. ASSEMBLED IN TEXAS WITH U.S. AND GLOBALLY SOURCED PARTS. Contents 4 6 8 10 Activities and Programs Parks Near You Places to Stay Recreational Vehicles 12 Tips for Time in Nature Ray Roberts Devils River 14 Visitor Fees and Passes Directory TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT 18 Big Bend Country 26 34 48 56 64 80 86 Gulf Coast TPW COMMISSION S. Reed Morian, Chairman Houston Arch “Beaver” Aplin, III, Vice-Chairman Lake Jackson James E. Abell Kilgore Oliver J. Bell Cleveland Anna B. Galo Laredo Jeffery D. Hildebrand Houston Jeanne W. Latimer San Antonio Robert L. “Bobby” Patton, Jr. Fort Worth Dick Scott Wimberley T. Dan Friedkin, Chairman-Emeritus Houston Lee Marshall Bass, Chairman-Emeritus Fort Worth Hill Country Panhandle Plains Pineywoods Prairies and Lakes South Texas Plains Carter P. Smith Executive Director Rodney Franklin State Parks Director Josh Havens Communications Director Facilities and Activities Index 44 State Parks Map Special thanks to Toyota and advertisers, whose generous support made this guide possible. Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Cover photo: Tyler State Park, Chase Fountain Texas State Parks Official Guide, Seventeenth Edition © TPWD PWD BK P4000-000A (5/20) TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. WELCOME from Rodney Franklin, State Parks Director   Texas contains some of the most diverse public lands in the country. There is a wealth of cultural heritage. Wildlife abounds, landscapes flourish with beauty and our history is abundant. Your state parks are a part of the legacy that makes Texas proud. The people of Texas recently helped secure that legacy for future generations by voting yes to Proposition 5. Thank you! These 630,000-plus acres showcase some of our state’s greatest treasures. Parks help people make memories with family and find respite in nature’s playground. They strengthen local economies and bind communities. Most of all, parks enable each of us to spend time outside to recharge, be healthy and relax in our own way. I invite you to enjoy your state parks, exploring the best of Texas with friends and family. The parks are here for you. They belong to you. Please visit, have fun, and help protect them forever! Thank you, Texas! Texans voted to approve passage of Proposition 5 in the November 5, 2019 election. Now 100% of the sporting goods sales tax will go to fund the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and Texas Historical Commission. This funding will help secure the future of local parks, state parks and historic sites for generations to come, all without increasing taxes. We would like to extend our deepest gratitude. See what’s in store for Texas State Parks: texasstateparks.org/better ACTIVITIES & PROGRAMS What is there to do in state parks? Enjoy a family picnic, tour a hallowed historic site or choose from some of these visitor favorites: Bike Pedal across parks at any speed, in any style, with any group. Choose the routes, surfaces and distances that fit your comfort zone. Walk Start with a shorter loop, tackle tougher terrain or join a guided tour. Fish Fish without a license in as many as 70 state parks. Many offer tackle loaner programs and special learnto-fish events. Boat or Paddle Rent canoes and kayaks, explore a Texas Paddling Trail or launch a boat. View Wildlife Discover the birds, mammals and plants that live in Texas. Many parks have signage and checklists to help you learn more about the wildlife around you. 4 Camp Swim Find a site that meets your needs. Test out new recipes, share your favorite stories and enjoy the stars. Beat the heat at creeks, rivers, lakes, springs, pools and ocean beaches. More information & reservations: texasstateparks.org (512) 389-8900 Many state parks offer special guided and self-guided progra
Guía de Parques INSTALACIONES Descarga la Aplicacíon Móvil MAPAS ACTIVIDADES texasstateparks.org/app ¡Los niños entran gratis! La entrada es gratis para los niños de 12 años y menores. Encuentra un parque: parquesdetexas.org Contenido Estero Llano Grande SP 2 4 6 8 9 10 18 Actividades y Programas Parques Cercanos Lugares para Quedarse Tarifas y Pases Directorio Mapa de Parques Instalaciones y Actividades BIENVENIDO Rodney Franklin, Director de Parques Texas tiene algunas de las tierras públicas más diversas del país, con una gran riqueza natural y cultural. La vida silvestre está por todas partes, los paisajes florecen con belleza, y la historia es abundante. Sus parques estatales son parte del legado que nos enorgullece. La gente de Texas ayuda a asegurar ese legado para las generaciones futuras al visitar y ser voluntarios. ¡Gracias! Estos más de 630,000 acres exhiben algunos de los grandes tesoros del estado. Los parques nos ayudan a crear recuerdos con la familia y a encontrar consuelo en la naturaleza. Los parques fortalecen las economías locales y unen a las comunidades. Sobre todo, los parques nos permiten pasar tiempo al aire libre para recargar energías, estar saludables y relajarnos a nuestra manera. Les invito a disfrutar de sus parques estatales, explorando lo mejor de Texas con amigos y familia. Los parques están aquí para todos. Nos pertenecen a todos. ¡Visítelos, diviértase y ayude a protegerlos para siempre! Foto de portada: Estero Llano State Park, Chase Fountain © 2021 TPWD PWD BK P4000-000A (5/21) TPWD recibe fondos del Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU. (USFWS por sus siglas en ingles). TPWD prohíbe la discriminación por raza, color, religión, nacionalidad de origen, discapacidad, edad y género, conforme la ley estatal y federal. Para solicitar un acomodo especial u obtener información en un formato alternativo, por favor contacte a TPWD en un Teléfono de Texto (TTY) al (512) 3898915 ó por medio de “Relay Texas” al 7-1-1 ó (800) 735-2989 ó por email a accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. Si usted cree que TPWD ha discriminado en su contra, favor de comunicarse con TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, o con el Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU., Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. De acuerdo con la Ley de Depósito del Estado de Texas, esta publicación está disponible en el centro de Distribución de Publicaciones del Estado de Texas y/o las Bibliotecas de Depósito de Texas. ACTIVIDADES Y PROGRAMAS ¿Qué puedo hacer en los parques estatales? ¡Disfruta de un día de campo, visita un sitio histórico o elige entre muchas otras opciones! Bicicletas Pedalea a lo largo de los parques a cualquier velocidad, en cualquier estilo, con cualquier grupo. Elige las rutas, el tipo de terreno y las distancias que cumplan con tu zona de confort. Caminatas Empieza con un circuito más corto, avanza a terrenos más difíciles o únete a una caminata guiada. Pescar Puedes pescar sin licencia en tantos como 70 parques estatales. Muchos parques ofrecen equipo para pescar a manera de préstamo y eventos especiales para aprender a pescar. Barcos Renta canoas y kayacs y explora uno de los senderos acuáticos en Texas. Nadar Animales Silvestres Acampar Descubre aves, mamíferos y plantas que tienen su hogar en Texas. Muchos parques tienen señalamientos y listados que te ayudan a aprender más. Encuentra un lugar que cumpla con lo que quieres. Prueba nuevas recetas, comparte historias favoritas y disfruta de las estrellas. 2 Más información y reservaciones: parquesdetexas.org Escape del calor en arroyos, ríos, lagos, manantiales, piletas y playas del mar. Tu seguridad en el agua es muy importante. Lleva el chaleco salvavidas. Aprende a nadar. Guarda a los niños. (512) 389-8900 ¡Pregunta en tu parque cuáles están disponibles! Los niños de 12 años y menores entran GRATIS Cielos Estrellados Escapa de las luces de la ciudad y goza de maravillosas vistas del cielo que no encontrarás en ninguna otra parte. Ven a una fiesta de estrellas o toma una excursión de constelaciones auto-guiada. Familias en la Naturaleza Elige un taller o diseña tu propia aventura. ¡Monta una tienda de campaña, cocina al exterior, prende una fogata y juega al exterior! Nosotros te Toma una publicación gratuita de actividades o pregunta por los paquetes gratuitos con los parques proporcionamos todo el equipo. No es necesario tener experiencia. participantes. Usa los binoculares, lupas, libros de bosquejos y libros de guías para explorar el parque. Mochilas para Exploradores Soldados Búfalo de Texas Descubre la historia con cuentos, vestuarios y herramientas. Sigue la pista de un animal, pesca con caña, cocina sobre una fogata, visita los fuertes y más. Adéntrate en las historias de vida de aquellos que sirvieron valientemente en los primeros regimientos Áfrico-Americanos de las Fuerzas Armadas. ! Seguridad en el Parque Ten cuidado con el agua Pr

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