Ray Roberts Lake

State Park - Texas

Lake Ray Roberts is an artificial 29,350-acre (119 km2) American reservoir located 10 miles (20 km) north of Denton, Texas, between the cities of Pilot Point, Texas and Sanger, Texas. It is filled by a tributary of the Trinity River. It was named after Ray Roberts (a local congressman who supported creation of the lake) in 1980. The reservoir is located in, and supplies water to, Cooke, Grayson, and Denton counties. Ray Roberts is also used for recreation and is home to the Ray Roberts Lake State Park.
Ray Roberts Lake SP https://tpwd.texas.gov/state-parks/ray-roberts-lake https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Ray_Roberts Lake Ray Roberts is an artificial 29,350-acre (119 km2) American reservoir located 10 miles (20 km) north of Denton, Texas, between the cities of Pilot Point, Texas and Sanger, Texas. It is filled by a tributary of the Trinity River. It was named after Ray Roberts (a local congressman who supported creation of the lake) in 1980. The reservoir is located in, and supplies water to, Cooke, Grayson, and Denton counties. Ray Roberts is also used for recreation and is home to the Ray Roberts Lake State Park.
KENNETH SAINTONGE, TPWD INTERPRETIVE GUIDE RAY ROBERTS LAKE With over a quarter of the state’s population living in the North Central Texas area, natural wild spaces become even more precious. Ray Roberts Lake State Park provides a safe haven for native wildlife and a peaceful escape from the hustle and bustle of city life. While enjoying this natural beauty, please remember that everything you see in the park is protected. Artifacts, rocks, plants, and animals (even snakes) are all part of the region’s rich cultural and natural heritage. Help us keep recreational use sustainable for the future and protect these resources by leaving things as you find them. STATE PARK COMPLEX We hope you also explore these other North Texas natural wonders: ISLE DU BOIS UNIT JOHNSON BRANCH UNIT GREENBELT UNIT Eisenhower SP, 50 Park Road 20, 75020; (903) 465-1956 Bonham SP, 1363 State Park 24, 75418; (903) 583-5022 Cedar Hill SP, 1570 FM 1382, 75104; (972) 291-3900 TUCKED AWAY ON NORTH SIDE OF THE DFW METROPLEX, RAY ROBERTS LAKE STATE PARK IS A HIDDEN GEM WAITING TO BE Lake Mineral Wells SP, 100 Park Road 71, 76067; (940) 328-1171 EXPLORED. HERE YOU’LL Visit www.tpwd.texas.gov for more information on these and other Texas state parks and historic sites. DISCOVER Ray Roberts Lake State Park Complex Offices: Isle du Bois Unit Johnson Branch Unit 100 PW 4137 100 PW 4153 Pilot Point, TX 76258 Valley View, TX 76272 (940) 686-2148 (940) 637-2294 www.tpwd.texas.gov/rayrobertslake A BLEND BEAUTY UNIQUE TO NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS AND A RICH Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. KENNETH SAINTONGE, TPWD TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. OF PRAIRIE AND WOODLAND CULTURAL HISTORY. © 2019 TPWD. PWD BR P4503-137V (7/19) In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. THE A variety of outdoor recreational opportunities such as hiking, biking, and camping are accessible from the park’s different units: the Isle du Bois unit on the southeast shore, the Johnson Branch unit on the north shore, and a greenbelt corridor along the Elm Fork of the Trinity River. The park also has five satellite units around the lake with boat ramps at Buck Creek, Jordan, Pecan, Sanger, and Pond parks. Ray Roberts Lake provides water for the cities of Dallas and Denton. Originally known as Lake Aubrey, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers built the dam in 1987 to impound the 29,000-acre reservoir. The lake’s name changed in 1980 to honor the accomplishments of Denton’s legendary U.S. Congressman, Ray Roberts, who represented the area from 1962 to 1982. Roberts was affectionately known as “Mr. Water” for his leadership and foresight in managing and conserving the water resources of Texas. Ray Roberts Lake is the first in a series of reservoirs that captures the waters of the Trinity River watershed, the largest and most populated watershed in Texas. Congressman Ray Roberts L A K E S T A T E P A R K CROSSROADS OF DIVERSITY “A grassland is in many ways an upside-down world . . . Life thrives in an underworld of roots, which are the living heart of grasses and perennial plants.” Mary Taylor Young, Land of Grass and Sky – A Naturalist’s Prairie Journey Eastern Cross Timbers LAKE RAY ROBERTS Grand Prairie Blackland Prairie C O M P L E X Imagine life in North Texas hundreds of years ago, before cars, subdivisions, and malls. Picture vast prairies, rich forests, and clear running rivers and streams. As you explore the natural beauty that is Ray Roberts Lake State Park, you are taking a step back in time. Here you can observe picturesque landscapes and, if you’re lucky, spot some of their inhabitants; Ray Roberts Lake State Park is an oasis for wildlife. you can find coyotes, armadillos, roadrunners, and scissortailed flycatchers. The park’s incredible biological diversity comes from its crossroads of ecological regions. Most of the park lies within the Eastern Cross Timbers, a thin band of forest spanning 500 miles from southeast Kansas to Waco like a river of trees. The forest is home to white-tailed deer, bobcats, squirrels, cottontail rabbits, raccoons, and striped skunk. You’ll spot mockingbirds and painted buntings flitting among the trees. Interspersed throughout the fo
Ray Roberts Lake #TxStateParks State Park – Isle du Bois Unit To Pilot 7Point U.S. 37 N 2 e 4.5 mil Jor da FM 119 ar k nP il Tra Kid Fish Pond il ra kT les m mi El 3.5 Yield To r Fo Na tur Bluestem Grove Jordan Park To Pilot Point, US 377 s to ra i eT Sites 171-184 l Sites 1 - 40 mile il ra kT cen ter lo Hawthorn r Fo • Park hours 6 a.m. – 10 p.m. op m Ray Roberts Lake El • Campsite check-out – 2 p.m. 2. 2 • Site selection based on availability. Randy Bell Scenic Trail • Maximum eight people per campsite. Deer Ridge FM 455 PLEASE NOTE Sites 41-116 • Renew overnight sites by 9 a.m. • Discharge gray and black water at dump station. • Public consumption or display of any alcoholic beverage is prohibited. Per person entry fee required at all parks. Trail Underpass Quail Run Sites 132-170 • It is an offense to possess, display or discharge any firearm. To Greenbelt • Pets must be on a leash not exceeding six feet in length. Wild Plum Sites 117-131 • All vehicles must remain on pavement. DORBA Trailhead Parking • Gathering firewood prohibited. • Possession or discharge of fireworks prohibited. @TPWDparks TexasStateParks.org/App LEGEND Stop the spread of zebra mussels. CLEAN, DRAIN and DRY your boat. No potable water available on Jordan Park Trail north of Bluestem Grove. , Trail Courtesy Lone Star Lodge & Marina @texasparkswildlife /texasparksandwildlife FM 1192 3.5 mile turn-aroun s to d loop #BetterOutside • Minors must be supervised or furnish written consent of parent or guardian. Elm Fork (East & West) • Valid permit required on windshield of each vehicle. • Numbered sites for overnight camping only. To Sange • One unit per campsite may connect to utilities. r, I-35 • Excess parking fee required for sites with more than two vehicles. Headquarters Restrooms Chemical Toilets Showers Primitive Sites Water and Electric Sites Equestrian Parking Equestrian Camping Watering Area Water Spigot Fishing Pier Fish Cleaning Hiking Trail Horse Trail Biking Trail Picnic Area Picnic Shelter Group Picnic Pavilion Designated Swimming Area Parking Boat Ramp Playground Lodging Canoe Launch Amphitheater Interpretive Center Dump Station Residence Maintenance Concrete Trail Dirt Trail Improved Trail NOTE Equine must have proof of a negative EIA (Coggins) test within the past 12 months. The form VS 10-11 is proof of testing. 100 PW 4137 Pilot Point, TX 76258 (940) 686-2148 TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. © 2019 TPWD PWD MP P4503-137N (2/19) Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. PARK RESERVATIONS TexasStateParks.org ParquesDeTexas.org (512) 389-8900 Proud Sponsor of Texas State Parks
Ray Roberts Lake #TxStateParks State Park – Johnson Branch Unit #BetterOutside /texasparksandwildlife @texasparkswildlife @TPWDparks TexasStateParks.org/App LEGEND N FM 30 Headquarters Stop the spread of zebra mussels. CLEAN, DRAIN and DRY your boat. 02 Restrooms Showers Chemical Toilets Dump Station Primitive Tent Sites Well Water and Electric Sites er loop iles cent 2.8 m Fish Cleaning PLEASE NOTE Dogwood Canyon • Park hours 8 a.m. - 10 p.m. Hiking Trail DORBA Trailhead Biking Trail Sites 135-154 Picnic Area • Campsite check-out - 12 p.m. Juniper Cove • Site selection based on availability. • Maximum eight people per campsite. 137 Covered Picnic Table Sites 1-39 138 • Renew overnight sites by 9 a.m. Group Picnic Pavilion Willow Cove Playground Sites 155-165 • Discharge gray and black water at dump station. Parking • Public consumption or display of any alcoholic beverage is prohibited. Boat Ramp • It is an offense to possess, display or discharge any firearm. Designated Swimming Area • Pets must be on a leash not exceeding six feet in length. • All vehicles must remain on pavement. Walnut • Gathering firewood prohibited. Maintenance Concrete Trail mi les • Valid permit required on windshield of each vehicle. Residence 9 sites 2.6 • Minors must be supervised or furnish written consent of parent or guardian. Overflow Campsite C Sites 40-104 Dogwood Canyon Primitive Hiking Trail • Possession or discharge of fireworks prohibited. Amphitheater and Kid Fish Pond Kid Fish Pond Trail • Numbered sites for overnight camping only. Overflow Campsite B Dirt Trail 4 sites • One unit per campsite may connect to utilities. Oak Point • Excess parking fee required for sites with more than two vehicles. TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. © 2019 TPWD PWD MP P4503-153A (2/19) Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Sites 105-134 PARK RESERVATIONS TexasStateParks.org ParquesDeTexas.org (512) 389-8900 100 PW 4153 Valley View, TX 76272 (940) 637-2294 Proud Sponsor of Texas State Parks
Ray Roberts Lake #TxStateParks State Park – Greenbelt #BetterOutside /texasparksandwildlife @TPWDparks @texasparkswildlife TexasStateParks.org/App LEGEND Ray Roberts Lake State Park is a game preserve. No hunting or firearms permitted. Entrance permit required. N To Isle du Bois Unit Ray Roberts Lake State Park To US 377, Pilot Point Rest Rooms To Aubrey, US 377 Chemical Toilets No water available south of the FM 428 access point. Hiking Trail To US 377, McKinney, US 75 Trail Underpass Biking Trail Equestrian Trail US 380 Access Point Equestrian Water Equestrian Parking FM 428 Access Point Parking Water Spigot Elm East 4.5 FM 4 miles to 55 A cces s Picnic Area 428 To Denton, Loop 288 to I-35 Elm West Picnic Shelter 6.5 miles to FM 428 Access Canoe Launch 380 Concrete Trail Trail Courtesy Yield To 455 NOTE Equine must have proof of a negative EIA (Coggins) test within the past 12 months. The form VS 10-11 is proof of testing. TRAIL ETIQUETTE Dirt Trail Consideration and polite behavior are essential in order to ensure the enjoyment of all trail users. Please observe the following guidelines: • Leave no trace: if you pack it in, pack it out. • Please stay on the trail. • Ride with a friend. Wear a helmet. • All users must yield to handicapped users. • Cyclists should pass other trail users slowly and considerately. Hikers and cyclists should always yield to horses and make their presence known well in advance, then move aside to allow horses to pass, if passing from the opposite direction; if passing horses from behind, hikers and bikers should pass on the left after making the rider aware of their presence. • Pets are permitted on the trails, but must be under control and on a leash at all times. • EMERGENCY DIAL 911. To Sanger, I-35 TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. © 2019 TPWD PWD MP P4503-176A (2/19) Scenic View Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. PARK RESERVATIONS TexasStateParks.org ParquesDeTexas.org (512) 389-8900 To Denton, Loop 288 to I-35 Improved Trail Park Boundary 100 PW 4137 Pilot Point, TX 76258 (940) 686-2148 Proud Sponsor of Texas State Parks
Ray Roberts Lake State Park Isle du Bois Unit Trails Map 100 PW 4137 Pilot Point, TX 76258 (940) 686-2148 www.texasstateparks.org LEGEND Restrooms/Showers Parking Headquarters Equestrian Parking Watering Area (equestrian) Fishing Pier Hiking Trail Biking Trail Horse Trail Picnic Area Picnic Shelter Swimming Area Boat Ramp Playground Amphitheater Nature Center Kid Fish Pond NOTES: All trails allow hiking and biking unless otherwise indicated. Contour intervals are 10 feet. Trail lengths are in miles. Elevation levels are in feet. No claims are made to the accuracy of the data or its suitability to a particular use. Map compiled by Texas State Parks staff. In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. © 2019 Texas Parks and Wildlife Department PWD MP P4503-0137AA (7/19) Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. POINTS OF INTEREST 3 NATURE CENTER 33° 21' 55.4" N 97° 00' 40.9" W Come on in to meet a friendly ranger or volunteer and learn about the natural and cultural history of our park. Inside you’ll find wildlife displays, live snakes, and an arts and crafts corner. You can also check out a free Junior Ranger Explorer backpack here! 4 POCKET PRAIRIES 33° 23' 01.4" N 97° 01' 15.9" W The Eastern Cross Timbers are sprinkled with a mosaic of small prairie areas known as pocket prairies. Here you’ll find a rich diversity of wildlife attracted to the transition from woodland to open prairie grasses. These pocket prairies rely on wildland fires to keep away the encroaching forest. 5 SEASONAL POND 33° 22' 56.8" N 97° 01' 22.7" W Seasonal wetlands like this small pond serve as temporary homes and nurseries for frogs, toads, salamanders, turtles, and more. You may also spot the occasional mammal coming for a drink. (GPS coordinates shown in degrees, minutes, seconds) 1 2 WINDOW INTO THE PAST 33° 22' 03.5" N 97° 00' 37.3" W This sandstone chimney is the last remaining feature of what was once a log cabin built in the 1880s by some of the first pioneers in North Texas. Try to imagine everyday life as an early settler here in the Crosstimbers. What would you eat? What would you do for fun? LAKESIDE LIFE 33° 22' 10.2" N 97° 00' 46.2" W Shhh. If quiet, you may be able to glimpse a great blue heron stalking for fish, a diving osprey, or swimming waterfowl. Come back on a summer evening and you’ll be greeted with a symphony of frog and toad calls. TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. Ray Roberts Lake State Park Isle du Bois Unit Explore the natural beauty of North Central Texas. TRAIL DISTANCE DIFFICULTY DESCRIPTION EAGLE ACTIVITY TRAIL 0.3 mi. Easy Can you leap like a frog? Scamper like a squirrel? Test your animal abilities and more on this self-guided trail designed for kids and their families. LOST PINES TRAIL 0.5 mi. Easy Catch a glimpse of the lake, see a remnant of an early settler’s cabin, and take in the towering pines mixed with native oaks and elms all in a half mile loop. RANDY BELL SCENIC TRAIL 2.2 mi. Easy Experience the many stories this trail has to share, and explore the woodlands and prairies as they were before Ray Roberts Lake was developed. EQUESTRIAN MULTIUSE TRAIL 10 mi. (each way) Moderate From the Lost Lake to the Elm Fork of the Greenbelt and beyond, these sandy equestrian trails extend beyond the map’s boundaries. No potable water is available on portions of the trail. STAYING SAFE DORBA TRAIL LOOP E 9.2 mi. Moderate KNOW YOUR LIMITS. Prepare for sun and heat. Wear sunscreen, insect repellent and appropriate clothing/ hiking shoes. Named for the Dallas Off Road Biking Association, five consecutive trails were built by mountain bikers. Intense riding crisscrosses prairies and timber lands alike. DORBA TRAIL LOOP D 7 mi. Challenging Note: D loop is EXPERT only. DORBA TRAIL LOOP C 4.4 mi. Challenging The middle portion of the DORBA trail. DORBA TRAIL LOOP B 0.7 mi. Moderate Less than a mile, this portion of the trail is a great follow-up from Loop A. DORBA TRAIL LOOP A 0.2 mi. Moderate The shortest of our DORBA trail loops. Perfect for beginners, or as a warm-up. Emerald green reflects against crystal blue waters, providing scenic views throughout the park. On wheel, foot, boat,
Ray Roberts Lake State Park Johnson Branch Unit Trails Map 700 To I-35 CR 254 ' To FM 372 100 PW 4153 Valley View, TX 76272 (940) 637-2294 www.texasstateparks.org 678' FM 3002 70 0' Park Entrance Reason Jones Road LEGEND 1.04 Restrooms/Showers Parking Headquarters Picnic Sites Chemical Toilets Hiking Trail Biking Trail Playground Amphitheater Kid Fish Pond Covered Picnic Table 700' DORBA Trail Orange Loop DORBA Trail Pink Loop 742' (Pink/Orange Loop 3.1 mi.) 6 0.2 0. 06 0.16 1 1 DORBA Trail Blue Loop 1.1 miles 70 0' 0.87 7 0.5 0.02 700' DORBA Trail Green Loop 4.9 mi. All trails allow hiking and biking unless otherwise indicated. Contour intervals are 10 feet. Trail lengths are in miles. Elevation levels are in feet. 0.72 4 0.6 700' NOTES: Dogwood Canyon Trail 2.6 mi. (One Way) 49 0. 708' 2 725' 0. 37 0.1 8 2 0.69 No claims are made to the accuracy of the data or its suitability to a particular use. Turkey 0.2 6 0.12 Map compiled by Texas State Parks staff. Dogwood Canyon 0.0 2 0.1 3 0.0 2 In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. 0.04 0.1 8 DORBA Trail Yellow Loop 722' Juniper Cove Concrete Trail 2.8 mi. 0' 70 0.27 (Red/Yellow Loop 8.8 mi.) 1.21 0.3 9 © 2017 Texas Parks and Wildlife Department PWD MP P4503-0153B (7/17) 0.24 DORBA Trail Red Loop 2.65 672' POINTS OF INTEREST 0' 70 4 5 0' 0.11 ' 700 Kid Fish Pond Trail 0.5 mi. 0.02 0.1 7 0.13 0.03 1 0.1 0.05 4 0.05 0. 06 4 0.02 09 0. 0.02 DORBA TRAILHEAD 33° 25' 22.50" N 97° 3' 16.62" W From here, you can begin your hike (or ride) through nearly 9 miles of Eastern Crosstimbers and small prairie pockets. CORRAL 33° 24' 53.04" N 97° 2' 44.82" W For many generations, the Jones family used this corral to keep their farm animals safe. What's your favorite farm animal? Willow Cove 65 Walnut 0.02 3 3 0.21 0.02 REFLECTION BENCH 33° 25' 38.58" N 97° 3' 36" W Relax, and sit a moment. This bench is a quiet place to enjoy the tranquility of the Crosstimbers forest. Listen for songbirds singing, and maybe spot a wild turkey! 0. 79 2 3 0. 12 0.2 1 0.1 0. 07 (GPS coordinates shown in degrees, minutes, seconds) 5 5 639' KID FISH POND 33° 24' 37.26" N 97° 2' 55.44" W Wet a line and try your hand at our Kid Fish Pond. Whether it's rainbow trout, channel catfish, or bluegill, something is always biting! 65 0' 600' SCALE 0 WOLF ISLAND VIEW 33° 24' 30.30" N 97° 2' 38.28" W Come down to the point, and take in the scene. See Wolf Island, Ray Roberts Dam, and panoramic views of CR 420 the lake all from one spot. 0.15 0.3 Miles Oak Point 663' TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. Ray Roberts Lake State Park Johnson Branch Unit FOR EMERGENCIES, PLEASE CALL 9-1-1. 100 PW 4153 Valley View, TX 76272 (940) 637-2294 TRAIL DISTANCE DOGWOOD CANYON TRAIL 2.6 miles (One Moderate Way) This primitive path winds the Crosstimbers and pockets of native prairie, providing a variety of views. Note: No water is available along this trail. KID FISH POND TRAIL 0.5 miles Easy Take a relaxing stroll around the Kid Fish Pond. Bring your pole, and wet a line when you finish your hike! CONCRETE TRAIL 2.8 miles Easy This paved trail is great for families of all ages! Pick this trail up from nearly any camping loop, and start your adventure! DORBA TRAIL RED/YELLOW LOOPS 8.8 miles Challenging Named for the Dallas Off Road Biking Association, six consecutive trails were built by mountain bikers. Intense riding crisscrosses prairies and timber lands alike. (Note: Red Loop is EXPERT only) DORBA TRAIL GREEN LOOP 4.9 miles Moderate One of the easier loops on this trail; you can access it from either the pink/orange loops or via the Dogwood Canyon Trail. DRINK PLENTY OF WATER. Your body quickly loses fluids when you’re on the trail. Bring a quart of water per hour of activity. DORBA TRAIL PINK/ORANGE LOOPS 3.1 miles Moderate The second and third loops of the DORBA trail. Look for some beautiful views along this trail. TELL OTHERS WHERE YOU’LL BE. If possible, avoid exploring alone. Tell someone where you are going and when you plan to return. DORBA TRAIL BLUE LOOP 1.1 miles Moderate The shortest of our DORBA trail loops. Perfect for beginners, or as a warm-up. Get back to nature at Johnson Branch Unit! Just a short dr
Ray Roberts Lake State Park Greenbelt Unit Trails Map 2 Ray Roberts Lake Isle du Bois Unit Park Entrance 1.1 100 PW 4137 Pilot Point, TX 76258 (940) 686-2148 www.texasstateparks.org 732' S To Pilot Point, U 669' 0.9 732' Elm Fork/ Hwy 455 Greenbelt Park Entrance 455 558' 663' 377 618' 115 69 El m 0.83 559' 597' 0.07 7 0.2 er, I-35 To Sang 615' 66 624' Fo rk 632' Tr i n ity 625' Concrete Trail 0.9 mi. 587' River Equestrian Trail 6.8 mi. 571' 596' 671' 634' 596' 691' 593' Belted Kingfishers 2 585' Hard Surface Trail 4.0 mi. 588' ch ran 3.98 611' 557' 4.4 8 5 B ay Br 597' 584' 594' 291 658' 646' 544' 548' 141 593' 615' 636' 619' SCALE 0 0 0.5 3000 1 Mile 6000 Feet 4 584' ranch 0.2 POINTS OF INTEREST (GPS coordinates shown in degrees, minutes, seconds) 626' Aubrey B 07 0. 428 617' 641' LEGEND Restrooms Parking Vault Toilet Day Use Area Hiking Trail Biking Trail Horse Trail Canoe Launch Scenic Overlook Equestrian Parking Water for Horses 542' 621' 4 1.5 537' 0. 19 0.14 692' 652' an Br 662' ch 586' 633' ek 155 Scenic Overlook Trail 0.3 mi. 0.34 539' 658' Cre HISTORIC 428 BRIDGE 33° 18' 25.0" N 97° 02' 32.1" W Built on one of Denton's original wagon trails, this historic steel bridge was an important two-way automobile crossing over the Elm Fork River in the 1920s. 584' 1 Hard Surface Trail 5.8 mi. ar Cle 4 BOTTOMLAND HARDWOOD FOREST 33° 14' 43.8" N 97° 02' 36.3" W Growing along the life-giving waters of the Elm Fork of the Trinity River, towering cottonwoods, sycamores, pecans, bur oaks, and more make up what is known as the bottomland hardwood forest. 682' 152 lp Cu 3 OLD MCKINNEY BRIDGE 33° 19' 58.6" N 97° 01' 50.7" W This old steel bridge was originally built around 1911 to connect the communities of Green Valley and Belew. Can you imagine driving an original Ford Model T across this bridge? 143 Equestrian Trail 6.0 mi. 536' 657' 617' 153 4.02 2 SCENIC OVERLOOK 33° 17' 15.6" N 97° 01' 54.4" W Hike up a hill for a commanding view of the Crosstimbers landscape. Out in the distance you'll see the city of Denton. 1 1.4 1 653' 608' 645' 5 Elm Fork Trinity River 545' 528 566' 8 4.2 WILDFLOWER WONDERLAND 33° 19' 36.4" N 97° 01' 46.4" W Each spring, nature paints a canvas of color on the land. Explore a mosaic of Indian paintbrush, brown-eyed Susan, Mexican hat, and more blanketing the landscape. 567' 642' 158 154 All trails are hiking and biking unless otherwise indicated. The lower portion of the park is closed due to flood damage until further notice. 599' 584' 573' Contour intervals are 10 feet. Trail lengths are in miles. Elevation levels are in feet. 624' No claims are made to the accuracy of the data or its suitability to a particular use. Map compiled by Texas State Parks staff. In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the 380 643' 592' 382 Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. 380 Hwy 380 Greenbelt Park Entrance © 2018 Texas Parks and Wildlife Department PWD MP P4503-0176B (7/18) Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. 531' 3 569' TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. To US 377, McKinney, US 75 625' 595' Ray Roberts Lake State Park Greenbelt Unit Explore the Trinity River, by bike, horse, foot, or paddle. Experience the north end of the Trinity River; what you see here will flow all the way to the Gulf. Each of these access points (Hwys 455, 428 and 380), provide a unique view of this important watershed to be explored by bike, horse, foot, or paddle. Because of the Ray Roberts Dam, this river will always be flowing. TRAIL DISTANCE TIME DIFFICULTY DESCRIPTION EQUESTRIAN TRAIL 6.8 mi. 2 hrs. Moderate This sandy, open trail, with little canopy cover, follows along the Trinity River riparian zone. Please note there is no water available along this trail, or at the Hwy 380 park. 6.0 mi. 2 hrs. Moderate This sandy, open trail, with little canopy cover, follows along the Trinity River riparian zone. Please note there is no water available along this trail, or at the Hwy 380 park. 4.0 mi. 2 hrs. Easy Follow this gravel trail towards the Hwy 380 park and find yourself shaded by large, old growth trees. Please note there is no water available along this trail or at the Hwy 380 park. 5.8 mi. 3 hrs. Easy Follo
Southwestern Tablelands Central Great Plains Texas Blackland Prairies Cross Timbers (Post Oak Savannah) Edwards Plateau East Central Texas Plains (Post Oak Savannah) Western Gulf Coastal Plain (Piney Woods) Gulf Coast Prairies and Marshes Southern Texas Plains Blue Water Leaf Ray Roberts Lake State Park Isle du Bois Unit 100 PW 4137 Pilot Point, Texas 76258 (940) 686–2148 For more information, visit www.tpwd.texas.gov/rayrobertslake B I G B E N D R A N C H S TAT E P A R K A Walk T hrough Time RayRobertsLakeStatePark Ray Roberts Lake State Park is located in the Cross Timbers, a subregion of the Post Oak Savannah ecoregion. This 2.2-mile trail takes you through some of the finest examples of habitat in the Post Oak Savannah ecoregion. The land under the lake might have looked like this before the lake was constructed in the 1980s, covering the area with water. As you hike along the trail you will see dense woodlands and playful, open prairies. Follow along with this trail guide to learn more about the communities of the Cross Timbers and the Post Oak Savannah and take a walk through time. @RayRobertsLake Cover photo and photo above courtesy of “Nature’s Stage,” a contributor to the Ray Roberts Lake photo contest on Flickr. RAY ROBERTS LAKE STATE PARK 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, Texas 78744 www.tpwd.texas.gov © 2014 Texas Parks and Wildlife Department PWD BR P4503-0137Y (10/14) In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. TPWD receives federal assistance from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other federal agencies and is subject to Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and state anti-discrimination laws which prohibit discrimination the basis of race, color, national origin, age, sex or disability. If you believe that you have been discriminated against in any TPWD program, activity or facility, or need more information, please contact Office of Diversity and Inclusive Workforce Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church VA 22041. Explore the woodlands and prairies as they were before Ray Roberts Lake was developed, and experience the many stories the Randy Bell Scenic Trail has to share. 1 Precious Prairie Pocket prairies like the one you see here were once common features of the Post Oak Savannah. Travelers would often use prairie openings like this one to stop and rest. In 1716, Capitan don Domingo Ramón wrote, “We advanced seven leagues with great difficulty, arriving in the afternoon in an open spot that God had placed there for us to rest after such a painful journey.” Besides providing a good stopping place, these prairies support insects, birds and mammals. The native grasses that grow here are tough and hardy. Some have roots extending 16 feet deep into the soil, helping them survive even the worst drought. 2 Monte Grande 5 Irving wrote about his adventures exploring the west including a stay in the Cross Timbers. “After a tedious ride of several miles, we came out upon an open tract of hill and dale, interspersed with woodland. Here we were roused by the cry, Buffalo! Buffalo! Three or four of those enormous animals were visible to our right[,] grazing on the slope of a distant hill.” 4 As you look around, you will notice that this part of the trail crosses dense woodlands. The dominant trees are primarily oaks and elms, common for the Post Oak Savannah. The earliest written descriptions of this region came from Spanish explorers. They called it Monte Grande, which means “large forest.” “We crossed the Monte Grande. The name fits it, since it is necessary to bring a guide in order to go through it, because it is so wooded and entangled,” wrote Fray Francisco Céliz in 1718. 3 Days Gone Bye Wildlife such as deer, armadillos and roadrunners are often observed from the Randy Bell Scenic Trail. Would you believe that bison and bear used to live here, too? In his 1832 bestselling book, A Tour on the Prairies, Washington Like a Thousand Tiny Crystals Little Bluestem grass (Schizachyrium scoparium) is one of the “big four” tallgrass prairie species common to this region. Bunch grasses like Little Bluestem, Big Bluestem, Indiangrass and Switchgrass once grew abundantly in the Post Oak Savannah ecoregion. There are many accounts of settlers and travelers having to stand on their horses to gain a view above the tall grasses. Little Bluestem gets its name from the bluish color of the stems in spring. As summer turns to fall, the grass will take on a deep rusty color. The white, fuzzy flowers of the Little Bluestem stay on the grass over the winter months, the seeds providing vital food for birds. When lit by the sunshine, a prairie of Little B
TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE BIRDS OF RAY ROBERTS LAKE S T A T E P A R K A FIELD CHECKLIST 2010 Cover: Illustration of Double-crested Cormorant by Rob Fleming. INTRODUCTION S ituated along the shores of a 30,000-acre reservoir, Ray Roberts Lake State Park Complex consists of two state park units (Isle du Bois and Johnson Branch), six satellite parks (Jordan Unit, Pond Creek, Pecan Creek, Buck Creek, Sanger, and Elm Fork), wildlife management areas, wetlands, waterfowl sanctuaries and the 20-mile Ray Roberts Lake/Lake Lewisville Greenbelt Corridor. The lake was created to provide water to the Cities of Dallas and Denton. Ray Roberts Lake, authorized by the Rivers and Harbors Act of 1965, takes in portions of three counties: Denton, Cooke, and Grayson. Originally known as the Aubrey Reservoir, the lake was named in 1980 for former Congressman Ray Roberts (1913-1992) of Denton. The lake is a 29.350-acre Corps of Engineers impoundment on the Elm Fork of the Trinity River. The lake is surrounded by two state park units (Isle du Bois and Johnson Branch), six satellite parks, as well as wildlife management areas, wetlands, and waterfowl sanctuaries. All the parks are open. Jordan Unit contains 477 acres; Pond Creek – 20 acres; Pecan Creek – 48 acres; Buck Creek – 11 acres; Sanger – 20 acres; and Elm Fork – 290 acres. The park is located in the Eastern Cross Timbers, a narrow strip of wooded terrain bordering the Blackland Prairies of NorthCentral Texas. Geologically, the region is part of the Woodbine Formation, an Upper Cretaceous deposit consisting mostly of sandstone, with localized layers of shales and clay. A partial plant list includes sumac holly, milkweed, prickly pear, honeysuckle, sunflower, rough leaf dogwood, eastern red cedar, persimmon, bullnettle, blackjack oak, post oak, bluestem grass, grass burr, Bermuda grass, switch grass, Indian grass, Johnson grass, Texas wintergrass, black hickory, black walnut, red bud, honey locust, honey mesquite, greenbrier, Spanish needles, chinaberry, snailseed, bois d’arc, red mulberry, pokeweed, buckwheat, knotweed, hawthorne, wild plum, blackberry, toothache tree, eastern cottonwood, black willow, western soapberry, gum elastic, ground cherry, horse nettle, winged elm, American elm, ivy treevine, and mustang grape. You can contribute to this checklist by reporting new and unusual sightings or changes in status. You may leave your sightings 1 at the park headquarters or mail them to the Natural Resources Program, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, Texas 78744. Nomenclature and organization for this checklist follow the 7th edition of the American Ornithologists Union Check-list of North American Birds, as currently amended. Please help us protect the natural avian communities in our parks by refraining from using playback tapes of bird songs. Frequent use of these tapes disrupts essential territorial behavior and may lead to nest failure. Thank you for your cooperation. LEGEND A – Abundant – should be seen on 75% or more of trips in proper habitat and season. Often encountered in large numbers. C – Common – should be seen on 50% or more of trips in proper habitat and season. Can sometimes be encountered in large numbers. U – Uncommon – should be seen on 25% or more of trips in proper habitat and season. Usually not encountered in more than moderate numbers. O – Occasional – should be seen on 10% or more of trips in proper habitat and season. Usually not encountered in more than small numbers. R – Rare – not seen annually, but expected to occur again. Usually no more than one or two individuals are encountered. X – Accidental – only one or two records in any decade. I – Irregular – absent some years, but may be numerous in others. Sp S F W – – – – spring (March – May) summer (June – July) fall (August – November) winter (December – February) 2 CHECKLIST Sp F W ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ Greater White-fronted Goose.................. O O Snow Goose................................................ O O Canada Goose............................................ U Wood Duck ............................................... U U U Gadwall........................................................ C C American Wigeon...................................... C R C Mallard ..................................................... C A Blue-winged Teal....................................... A A Cinnamon Teal........................................... U Northern Shoveler..................................... A R C Northern Pintail........................................ U C Green-winged Teal..................................... C C Canvasback................................................. U C Redhead....................................................... U A Ring-necked Duck...................................... C C Greater Scaup...................................
TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE RAY ROBERTS LAKE STATE PARK RAY ROBERTS LAKE STATE PARK Wildlife Lost Pines Nature Trail and their Tracks Lake Birding Area BOBCAT FORE 12 10 11 13 Chimney HIND 9 14 FORE 8 15 HIND RACCOON 7 rail Horse T 16 FOX SQUIRREL FORE 6 17 FORE HIND 5 HIND RINGTAIL 18 COYOTE 19 2 3 4 1 Trailhead FORE HIND HQ SKUNK FORE WHITE-TAILED DEER HIND As you follow the 1/2-mile loop trail, you will see numbered marker posts that correspond to this trail guide. DEWCLAWS SHOW WHEN RUNNING FORE HIND PLEASE: BEAVER FORE OPOSSUM HIND FORE • • • • Pack out what you pack in. Remain on the trail at all times. Do not remove or damage any specimens. Take your time, listen and look for nature’s wonders, be safe and enjoy your walk! HIND PWD BR P4503-137Z (9/09) Ray Roberts Lake State Park is located in the Eastern Cross Timbers vegetation region, a narrow strip of dense woodlands bisecting a broad area of the Blackland and Grand Prairie in north-central Texas. To learn more about the flora, fauna and natural regions of Texas, visit our Web site at www.tpwd.state.tx.us/kids/ 1. The Forest Floor Under the canopy of oaks and elms lies the seasonal layering of each autumn’s leaves. With one inch of topsoil formed about every 500 years, the decomposition of organic matter is a slow, steady process. A mixture of rock, clay, silt, and sand, as well as living and dead organisms, moisture and air spaces, makes up the sandy loam soil, the foundation of life on Earth. 2. Yucca A member of the lily family, yuccas have been used by native people and early settlers for baskets, mats, sandals and rope. The flowers attract hummingbirds and may be eaten raw. Soap can be made from the roots. Every part of the yucca can be utilized. 3. Blackjack Oak Blackjack oaks are the co-dominant species in the Cross Timbers region. The wood is used for railroad cross-ties, firewood and charcoal. Drooping limbs are characteristic of this oak. 4. Bull Nettle Look but don’t touch! This plant has tiny needles that can irritate your skin. Underground is a tuber root, much like a potato, that the Native Americans and early settlers cooked much like our modern day French fries. 5. Mexican Plum This species is a common wild plum in North Texas. The sweet purplish-red fruit is eaten fresh or made into preserves; it is enjoyed by a variety of wildlife as well. Chickasaw plum thickets may also be encountered along the trail. 6. Post Oak Post oaks are the dominant tree species in this region. The wood is marketed as white oak and is used for railroad ties, posts and in construction. The tree is sometimes referred to as “ironwood.” This particular tree is very old and may have been enjoyed by the settlers that once lived in the pre-Civil War log cabin. 7. Live Oak Named for its evergreen foliage, live oak timber was once important for building ships. The nation’s first publicly owned timber lands were purchased as early as 1799 to preserve live oaks for this purpose. 8. Hercules-Club This plant is also called toothache tree or tingle-tongue. Chewing the bitter, aromatic bark or foliage is a home remedy for numbing the pain of a toothache. This tree is a host plant for the giant swallowtail butterfly. 9. Gum Bumelia (or Chittamwood) Early settler children once chewed sap from cuts in the trunk like gum. The fruit is edible but can cause nausea. The wood can be used for making tool handles and cabinets. 10. Poison Ivy Beware of this plant! Some plants, though beneficial to the entire ecosystem, can be harmful to humans. Birds and wildlife forage this plant without adverse effects. Remember: leaves of three, let them be. 11. Coralberry Coralberry is a short, deciduous shrub which grows thickets. The longpersisting fruit clusters are eaten by numerous songbirds, bobwhite quail and wild turkey. 12. Eastern Redcedar The aromatic wood from this evergreen is used for fence posts, cedar chests and furniture. This invasive species replaces better wildlife habitat when fire is prevented. 13. American Elm This large handsome tree was once very abundant, but Dutch elm disease, caused by a fungus and spread by bark beetles, has hurt the population. The wood is used for containers, furniture and paneling. Notice the American beautyberry growing next to the elm. 14. Cedar Elm This tree is a native elm and has wings on the limbs like winged elm. It also has rough-surfaced, very small leaves and sometimes grows next to cedars. 15. Winged Elm This is a dominant species in the park. The tree has distinctive corky wings on the limbs. The early settlers used the fibrous inner bark for rope to tie cotton bales. Creek Indians called this tree “wahoo.” 16. Slash Pine and Greenbrier Known at Ray Roberts as the Lost Pines, these pines were first planted about 1950 and they have done very well. The greenbrier thicket may be painfully prickly, but it provides good cover for wildlife. The small berries provide
-Official- FA C I L I T I E S MAPS Get the Mobile App: ACTIVITIES texasstateparks.org/app Toyota Tundra Let your sense of adventure be your guide with the Toyota Official Vehicle of the Texas Parks & Wildlife Foundation Tundra — built to help you explore all that the great state of Texas has to offer. | toyota.com/trucks BUILT HERE. LIVES HERE. ASSEMBLED IN TEXAS WITH U.S. AND GLOBALLY SOURCED PARTS. Contents 4 6 8 10 Activities and Programs Parks Near You Places to Stay Recreational Vehicles 12 Tips for Time in Nature Ray Roberts Devils River 14 Visitor Fees and Passes Directory TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT 18 Big Bend Country 26 34 48 56 64 80 86 Gulf Coast TPW COMMISSION S. Reed Morian, Chairman Houston Arch “Beaver” Aplin, III, Vice-Chairman Lake Jackson James E. Abell Kilgore Oliver J. Bell Cleveland Anna B. Galo Laredo Jeffery D. Hildebrand Houston Jeanne W. Latimer San Antonio Robert L. “Bobby” Patton, Jr. Fort Worth Dick Scott Wimberley T. Dan Friedkin, Chairman-Emeritus Houston Lee Marshall Bass, Chairman-Emeritus Fort Worth Hill Country Panhandle Plains Pineywoods Prairies and Lakes South Texas Plains Carter P. Smith Executive Director Rodney Franklin State Parks Director Josh Havens Communications Director Facilities and Activities Index 44 State Parks Map Special thanks to Toyota and advertisers, whose generous support made this guide possible. Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Cover photo: Tyler State Park, Chase Fountain Texas State Parks Official Guide, Seventeenth Edition © TPWD PWD BK P4000-000A (5/20) TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. WELCOME from Rodney Franklin, State Parks Director   Texas contains some of the most diverse public lands in the country. There is a wealth of cultural heritage. Wildlife abounds, landscapes flourish with beauty and our history is abundant. Your state parks are a part of the legacy that makes Texas proud. The people of Texas recently helped secure that legacy for future generations by voting yes to Proposition 5. Thank you! These 630,000-plus acres showcase some of our state’s greatest treasures. Parks help people make memories with family and find respite in nature’s playground. They strengthen local economies and bind communities. Most of all, parks enable each of us to spend time outside to recharge, be healthy and relax in our own way. I invite you to enjoy your state parks, exploring the best of Texas with friends and family. The parks are here for you. They belong to you. Please visit, have fun, and help protect them forever! Thank you, Texas! Texans voted to approve passage of Proposition 5 in the November 5, 2019 election. Now 100% of the sporting goods sales tax will go to fund the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and Texas Historical Commission. This funding will help secure the future of local parks, state parks and historic sites for generations to come, all without increasing taxes. We would like to extend our deepest gratitude. See what’s in store for Texas State Parks: texasstateparks.org/better ACTIVITIES & PROGRAMS What is there to do in state parks? Enjoy a family picnic, tour a hallowed historic site or choose from some of these visitor favorites: Bike Pedal across parks at any speed, in any style, with any group. Choose the routes, surfaces and distances that fit your comfort zone. Walk Start with a shorter loop, tackle tougher terrain or join a guided tour. Fish Fish without a license in as many as 70 state parks. Many offer tackle loaner programs and special learnto-fish events. Boat or Paddle Rent canoes and kayaks, explore a Texas Paddling Trail or launch a boat. View Wildlife Discover the birds, mammals and plants that live in Texas. Many parks have signage and checklists to help you learn more about the wildlife around you. 4 Camp Swim Find a site that meets your needs. Test out new recipes, share your favorite stories and enjoy the stars. Beat the heat at creeks, rivers, lakes, springs, pools and ocean beaches. More information & reservations: texasstateparks.org (512) 389-8900 Many state parks offer special guided and self-guided progra
Guía de Parques INSTALACIONES Descarga la Aplicacíon Móvil MAPAS ACTIVIDADES texasstateparks.org/app ¡Los niños entran gratis! La entrada es gratis para los niños de 12 años y menores. Encuentra un parque: parquesdetexas.org Contenido Estero Llano Grande SP 2 4 6 8 9 10 18 Actividades y Programas Parques Cercanos Lugares para Quedarse Tarifas y Pases Directorio Mapa de Parques Instalaciones y Actividades BIENVENIDO Rodney Franklin, Director de Parques Texas tiene algunas de las tierras públicas más diversas del país, con una gran riqueza natural y cultural. La vida silvestre está por todas partes, los paisajes florecen con belleza, y la historia es abundante. Sus parques estatales son parte del legado que nos enorgullece. La gente de Texas ayuda a asegurar ese legado para las generaciones futuras al visitar y ser voluntarios. ¡Gracias! Estos más de 630,000 acres exhiben algunos de los grandes tesoros del estado. Los parques nos ayudan a crear recuerdos con la familia y a encontrar consuelo en la naturaleza. Los parques fortalecen las economías locales y unen a las comunidades. Sobre todo, los parques nos permiten pasar tiempo al aire libre para recargar energías, estar saludables y relajarnos a nuestra manera. Les invito a disfrutar de sus parques estatales, explorando lo mejor de Texas con amigos y familia. Los parques están aquí para todos. Nos pertenecen a todos. ¡Visítelos, diviértase y ayude a protegerlos para siempre! Foto de portada: Estero Llano State Park, Chase Fountain © 2021 TPWD PWD BK P4000-000A (5/21) TPWD recibe fondos del Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU. (USFWS por sus siglas en ingles). TPWD prohíbe la discriminación por raza, color, religión, nacionalidad de origen, discapacidad, edad y género, conforme la ley estatal y federal. Para solicitar un acomodo especial u obtener información en un formato alternativo, por favor contacte a TPWD en un Teléfono de Texto (TTY) al (512) 3898915 ó por medio de “Relay Texas” al 7-1-1 ó (800) 735-2989 ó por email a accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. Si usted cree que TPWD ha discriminado en su contra, favor de comunicarse con TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, o con el Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU., Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. De acuerdo con la Ley de Depósito del Estado de Texas, esta publicación está disponible en el centro de Distribución de Publicaciones del Estado de Texas y/o las Bibliotecas de Depósito de Texas. ACTIVIDADES Y PROGRAMAS ¿Qué puedo hacer en los parques estatales? ¡Disfruta de un día de campo, visita un sitio histórico o elige entre muchas otras opciones! Bicicletas Pedalea a lo largo de los parques a cualquier velocidad, en cualquier estilo, con cualquier grupo. Elige las rutas, el tipo de terreno y las distancias que cumplan con tu zona de confort. Caminatas Empieza con un circuito más corto, avanza a terrenos más difíciles o únete a una caminata guiada. Pescar Puedes pescar sin licencia en tantos como 70 parques estatales. Muchos parques ofrecen equipo para pescar a manera de préstamo y eventos especiales para aprender a pescar. Barcos Renta canoas y kayacs y explora uno de los senderos acuáticos en Texas. Nadar Animales Silvestres Acampar Descubre aves, mamíferos y plantas que tienen su hogar en Texas. Muchos parques tienen señalamientos y listados que te ayudan a aprender más. Encuentra un lugar que cumpla con lo que quieres. Prueba nuevas recetas, comparte historias favoritas y disfruta de las estrellas. 2 Más información y reservaciones: parquesdetexas.org Escape del calor en arroyos, ríos, lagos, manantiales, piletas y playas del mar. Tu seguridad en el agua es muy importante. Lleva el chaleco salvavidas. Aprende a nadar. Guarda a los niños. (512) 389-8900 ¡Pregunta en tu parque cuáles están disponibles! Los niños de 12 años y menores entran GRATIS Cielos Estrellados Escapa de las luces de la ciudad y goza de maravillosas vistas del cielo que no encontrarás en ninguna otra parte. Ven a una fiesta de estrellas o toma una excursión de constelaciones auto-guiada. Familias en la Naturaleza Elige un taller o diseña tu propia aventura. ¡Monta una tienda de campaña, cocina al exterior, prende una fogata y juega al exterior! Nosotros te Toma una publicación gratuita de actividades o pregunta por los paquetes gratuitos con los parques proporcionamos todo el equipo. No es necesario tener experiencia. participantes. Usa los binoculares, lupas, libros de bosquejos y libros de guías para explorar el parque. Mochilas para Exploradores Soldados Búfalo de Texas Descubre la historia con cuentos, vestuarios y herramientas. Sigue la pista de un animal, pesca con caña, cocina sobre una fogata, visita los fuertes y más. Adéntrate en las historias de vida de aquellos que sirvieron valientemente en los primeros regimientos Áfrico-Americanos de las Fuerzas Armadas. ! Seguridad en el Parque Ten cuidado con el agua Pr

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