Laguna Atascosa

National Wildlife Refuge - Texas

Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge is the largest protected area of natural habitat left in the Lower Rio Grande Valley. The Peregrine Fund began reintroducing captive-bred northern aplomado falcons (Falco femoralis septentrionalis) to the refuge in 1985, which had been nearly extirpated from the Southwestern United States; today, it is home to 26 pairs. Nine other endangered or threatened species inhabit the refuge, such as the Texas ocelot (Leopardus pardalis albescens) and Gulf Coast jaguarundi (Puma yagouaroundi cacomitli), rare wild cats.

brochures

Brochure for Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Laguna Atascosa - Brochure

Brochure for Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Ocelots and Bobcats brochure for Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Laguna Atascosa - Ocelots and Bobcats

Ocelots and Bobcats brochure for Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Laguna Atascosa NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/laguna_atascosa https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laguna_Atascosa_National_Wildlife_Refuge Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge is the largest protected area of natural habitat left in the Lower Rio Grande Valley. The Peregrine Fund began reintroducing captive-bred northern aplomado falcons (Falco femoralis septentrionalis) to the refuge in 1985, which had been nearly extirpated from the Southwestern United States; today, it is home to 26 pairs. Nine other endangered or threatened species inhabit the refuge, such as the Texas ocelot (Leopardus pardalis albescens) and Gulf Coast jaguarundi (Puma yagouaroundi cacomitli), rare wild cats.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service 0.325 0.65 0.5 1 2 1.95 2.6 3 4 Miles Kilometers H an ip C h en S h a rl in g Mesquite Trail (continued) n el Not to scale with Visitor Center Area Map. Each loop is close to a half mile. a oA tas c We s North Point Trl Center Line Trail Vista Rd y Ca t L a ke Last Gate Trl Buena 2925 os FM H orse Is land T r l 0 1.3 Lakeside D r To Visitor Center l Tr sa County Trl tL ake es Kiskadee Trl Loop W ade ade e Tr E va om p s o n T rl Osprey Overlook rl Kidney Pond Trl Giant Palm Trail Ba y s id Photo Blind Amphitheater Gazebo Information Kiosk Pelican Lake Cemetery Park Camping San Roman Rd Park Boat Launch Refuge Office Redhead Ridge Dr Cattail Lake W Ted Hunt Rd Ba ys id e ild lif e FM 374 Moranco Blanco Trail Center Line Rd Parking Viewing Area Plover Point dlife D r e W il Dr Wildlife Trl B u en a FM 106 Visitor Center Picnic Area Vista R d South Boundary Trl Vista Rd rl Legend Restrooms Buena Mud T Is la n F ie ld sTd rl nd T Scu m Po Trl Po nd tor Ga l l Laguna Madre Lakeside Dr Schafer Rd Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge Welcome to Laguna Atascosa NWR e Tr Kiskadee Trl Loop Bay s ide Share 27 Rd Kisk Kisk s Lutte l Tr Camp rl eT ak tL es W rie 0.04 Miles Metalmark Butterfly Trl Metalmark Butterfly Trl Laguna Atascosa 106 ai Pr 0.02 L Ca uttes mp Trl Th FM 0.01 er nt Ce e or nc sit ra Vi Ent T rl 0 ite T rl ta s co La Lake kesiside deDDrr es q u oA Fiddlewood Trl Loop To M C ay Visitor Center Area Buen Buena Vista a Vista Rd Rd 0 We hope you enjoy your visit! We have recorded more species of birds than any other national wildlife refuge, provide habitat for several endangered species including the ocelot and aplomado falcon, and welcome visitors from around the world to discover the great diversity of birds, plants and wildlife found only in deep south Texas. Walk a trail, attend a tour, explore the exhibits, or bike our over 70 miles of trails. There’s something for everyone! Important Visitor Information To enter the Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge, visitors can pay entrance fees by cash or check at the Visitor Center, or with exact change or check at the self-pay station when the visitor center is closed. Entrance fees are applicable whether visitors are walking, driving or bicycling on the Refuge. All vehicles must display a valid Daily Entrance Pass—either issued by the Visitor Center staff or from the self-pay envelope. Help Us Protect the Refuge You can keep this Refuge special for wildlife and people by following all Refuge rules: Be watchful for wildlife on roads—especially the endangered ocelot. Please stay in the designated public areas (i.e., drives and trails) for your own safety and to protect the habitat. Keep dogs on a leash, and do not allow them to drink or enter water bodies due to the presence of alligators. Pack out your trash. Do not disturb or remove wildlife, plants or historic objects. Disturbance is caused by getting too close to wildlife, playing recorded bird/wildlife calls, feeding wildlife, or throwing objects at wildlife. Metal detectors are not allowed. No fireworks, fires, or alcohol. Camping is allowed only at Adolph Thomae Jr. County Park (entrance and camping fees apply for this area, call 956/748-2044 for information). For your safety and comfort Avoid chiggers, ticks and rattlesnakes by staying on trails. Be prepared with insect repellent, water and sunscreen. Plan to hike or bike during the cooler hours of the day (March– November). Use a map to plan your trip when venturing out on trails. Take a cell phone in case of an emergency. Wear comfortable, sturdy shoes with closed toes. Watching Wildlife For better observation of wildlife, keep noise to a minimum, move slowly, use your vehicle as a blind, try staying in one place and be patient. Most wildlife are active early or late in the day. For your safety and to avoid disturbing wildlife, stay at a safe distance. Feeding wildlife is illegal on the refuge as it causes animals to lose their natural fear of humans and they can become dangerous. Bridge Dirt Trail Gravel Trail/Road Paved Trail/Road Adolph Thomae Jr. County Park Wetlands Private Property Non-refuge Property Refuge Boundary For More Information Contact Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge 22817 Ocelot Road (Mailing) 22688 Buena Vista Road (Physical & GPS) Los Fresnos, Texas 78566 956/748-3607, ext 111 (Visitor Center) www.fws.gov/refuge/laguna_atascosa www.facebook.com/LagunaAtascosaNWR October 2017 Photographs from left to right, Ocelot. / © Larry Ditto Enjoying wildlife watching. / USFWS U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Designated Public Areas Laguna Atascosa Unit: Visitor Center Area There are several short, loop trails that visitors may walk (see map insert). These trails are accessible and offer several wildlife viewing areas, native plants, and are great for seeing butter
Ocelots: Distinguishing characteristics: • Small cat-like animal with distinct spots • Long, ringed tail that is nearly one-third the length of its body • Slightly rounded ears • Prefers dense brush, where it hunts for birds, snakes and rodents • Endangered: ocelots used to be found from South Texas up into Arkansas and Louisiana. Today, there are less than 50 ocelots left in the U.S. and all are found in the lower Rio Grande Valley What to do if you see an ocelot (alive OR dead): Immediately contact the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (956)784-7520 ~ (956)784-7608 ~ (956)748-3607 ~ (956)784-7500 After Hours (956) 874-4664 Provide important information, including: Your name and a phone number where you can be reached; location, time and type of sighting (alive or dead); identifying marks that confirm it was an ocelot and not a bobcat; directions on how to get to the location; and a detailed description of the area. If you find a dead ocelot: If you can, please stay with the carcass until FWS staff arrive. If you are not able to stay, please move the carcass so that it is not visible to passersby and FWS can retrieve. Be sure to let FWS know exactly where to find the carcass so they can retrieve it and collect important information such as internal tags and genetics. Bobcats Distinguishing characteristics: • Light brown to gray coat. Might have spots on coat but they are more subtle • Short tail • Tufted ears. More pointed than ocelot with tuft of hair • Larger than an ocelot • Found in various habitat types, including forest, coastal, wetlands, as well as near urban areas • Common throughout the U.S. How to tell an ocelot from a bobcat: Typical coat pattern of an ocelot Rounded ears on ocelot Long, ringed tail on ocelot Typical coat pattern of a bobcat Pointed and tufted ears on bobcat Short, bobbed tail on bobcat What to do if you see an ocelot (alive OR dead): Immediately contact the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (956)784-7520 ~ (956)784-7608 ~ (956)748-3607 ~ (956)784-7500 After Hours (956) 874-4664

also available

National Parks
USFS NW