Trinity River

National Wildlife Refuge - Texas

Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge was established to protect a portion of the bottomland hardwood forest ecosystem along the Trinity River located in southeastern Texas. The refuge, which is a remnant of what was once a much larger natural area, is a broad flat floodplain made up of numerous sloughs, oxbow lakes, artesian wells, and tributaries.

maps

Trails Map of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Trinity River - Trails Map

Trails Map of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Official visitor map of Big Thicket National Preserve (NPRES) in Texas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Big Thicket - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Big Thicket National Preserve (NPRES) in Texas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

brochures

Amphibians and Reptiles of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Trinity River - Amphibians and Reptiles

Amphibians and Reptiles of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Birds of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Trinity River - Birds

Birds of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Butterflies of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Trinity River - Butterflies and Dragonflies

Butterflies of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Fishes of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Trinity River - Fishes

Fishes of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Mammals of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Trinity River - Mammals

Mammals of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Moths of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Trinity River - Moths

Moths of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Plants of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Trinity River - Plants

Plants of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Trinity River NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/trinity_river/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trinity_River_National_Wildlife_Refuge Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge was established to protect a portion of the bottomland hardwood forest ecosystem along the Trinity River located in southeastern Texas. The refuge, which is a remnant of what was once a much larger natural area, is a broad flat floodplain made up of numerous sloughs, oxbow lakes, artesian wells, and tributaries.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Reptiles and Amphibians of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge Established in 1994, the 18,000-acre Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge is a remnant of what was once a much larger, frequently flooded, bottomland hardwood forest. You are still able to view vast expanses of ridge and swale floodplain features, numerous bayous, oxbow lakes, and cypress/tupelo swamps along the Trinity River. It is one of only 14 priorityone bottomland sites identified for protection in the Texas Bottomland Protection Plan. This type of habitat is used during migration or nesting by nearly 50 percent of the migratory bird species listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Over 275 species of birds occur in the hardwood forest and associated wetlands in eastern Texas; while over 100 bird species are known to breed there. These forests also support a wide diversity of mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and fish including the federally listed bald eagle and alligator. For more information, visit our website: http://southwest.fws.gov/refuges/texas/ trinityriver Green Anole Photograph by Garry Tucker This list follows the standard listings in Standard Common and Current Scientific Names for North American Amphibians, Turtles, Reptiles and Crocodilians (5th Edition) by Joseph T. Collins and Travis W. Taggart. Chicken Turtles Chicken Turtle Deirochelys reticalaria Softshells Texas Spiny Softshell Turtle Trionyx spiniferus emoryi Contact the Refuge staff if you should find an unlisted or rare species during your visit and provide a description. Lizards Introduced Geckos Alligators Green Anole Anolis carolinensis carolinensis Skinks Ground Skink Scincella lateralis Five-lined Skink Eumeces fasciatus Broadhead Skink Eumeces laticeps American Alligator Alligator mississippiens Turtles Snapping Turtles Common Snapping Turtle Chelydra serpentina serpentina Alligator Snapping Turtles Alligator Snapping Turtle Macrochelys temminckii Cooters Eastern River Cooter Pseudemys concinna Sliders Red-eared Slider Trachemys scripta elegans Mediterranean Gecko Hemidactylus turcicusAnoles Snakes Water Snakes Diamondback Water Snake Nerodia rhombifer rhombifer Yellowbelly Water Snake Nerodia erythogaster flavigaster Broad-banded Water Snake Nerodia fasciata confluens Crayfish Snakes Gulf Crayfish Snake Regina rigida sinicola Garter Snakes Eastern Garter Snake Thamnophis sirtalis sirtalis Gulf Coast Ribbon Snake Thamnophis proximus orarius Western Ribbon Snake Thamnophis proximus proximus Earth Snakes Rough Earth Snake Virginia striatula Hognose Snakes Eastern Hognose Snake Heterodon platirhinos Mud Snakes Western Mud Snake Farancia abacura reinwardtii Racers Buttermilk Racer Clouber constrictor anthicus Coachwhip Eastern Coachwhip Masticophis flagellum flagellum Rough Green Snake Rough Green Snake Opheodrys aestivus Rat Snakes Texas Rat Snake Elaphe obsoleta lindheimerii Kingsnakes Speckled Kingsnake Lampropeltis getula hobrooki Flathead Snakes Flathead Snake Tantilla gracilis Eastern Coral Snakes Texas Coral Snake Micrurus fulvius tener Copperheads and Cottonmouths Southern Copperhead Agkistrodon contortrix contortix Western Cottonmouth Agkistrodon piscivorus leucostoma Rattlesnakes Timber Rattlesnake Crotalus horridus Salamanders Central Newt Notophthalmus viridescens louisianensis Water Moccasin Frogs True Toads Narrowmouth Toads Eastern Narrowmouth Toad Gastrophryne carolinensis Gulf Coast Toad Bufo valliceps valliceps Cricket Frogs Blanchard’s Cricket Frog Acris crepitans blanchardi Tree Frogs Northern Spring Peeper Pseudacris crucifer crucifer Green Treefrog Hyla cinerea Gray Treefrog Hyla versicolor Photograph by Garry Tucker True Frogs Bullfrog Rana catesbeiana Bronze Frog Rana clamitans clamitans Southern Leopard Frog Rana utricularia Pickerel Frog Rana palustris Updated February 2008
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Birds of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge Established in 1994, the 25,000-acre Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge is a remnant of what was once a much larger, frequently flooded, bottomland hardwood forest. You are still able to view vast expanses of ridge and swale floodplain features, numerous bayous, oxbow lakes, and cypress/tupelo swamps along the Trinity River. It is one of only 14 priority-one bottomland sites identified for protection in the Texas Bottomland Protection Plan. This type of habitat is used during migration or nesting by nearly 50 percent of the migratory bird species listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Over 275 species of birds occur in the hardwood forest and associated wetlands in eastern Texas; while over 100 bird species are known to breed there. These forests also support a wide diversity of mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and fish including the federally listed alligator. For more information, please visit our website: www.fws.gov/southwest/refuges/ texas/trinityriver This 214 species list is in accordance with the 7th edition (1998) A.O.U. checklist through the July 2011 Supplement. The refuge a varied habitat and warm climate for excellent birding year round. Birding on the refuge is most interesting during the winter months. Fourteen species of sparrows winter on the refuge and fifteen species of wading birds nest here. Birdwatchers are treated to a spectacular Swallow-tailed kite © Shannon Tomkins/Houston Chronicle variety of more than 50 migrants including 25 warbler species during the spring and fall migration. During a “fallout” which typically occurs after a rainy cold front, lucky birders may view dozens of species of neotropical migrants. Contact the Refuge staff if you should find an unlisted or rare species during your visit and provide a description. Federally Endangered or Threatened Species are listed in italics. Common Name Ducks, Geese, and Swans ___Black-bellied Whistling-Duck ___Greater White-fronted Goose ___Snow Goose ___Ross’s Goose ___Canada Goose ___Wood Duck ___Gadwall ___American Wigeon ___Mallard ___Mottled Duck ___Blue-winged Teal ___Northern Shoveler ___Northern Pintail ___Green-winged Teal ___Redhead ___Ring-necked Duck ___Lesser Scaup ___Hooded Merganser ___Ruddy Duck Turkeys ___Wild Turkey Grebes ___Pied-billed Grebe Storks ___Wood Stork Cormorants ___Neotropic Cormorant ___Double-crested Cormorant Darters ___Anhinga Common Name Pelicans ___American White Pelican ___Brown Pelican Herons, Bitterns, and Allies ___American Bittern ___Least Bittern ___Great Blue Heron ___Great Egret ___Snowy Egret ___Little Blue Heron ___Tricolored Heron ___Reddish Egret ___Cattle Egret ___Green Heron ___Black-crowned Night-Heron ___Yellow-crowned Night Heron Ibises and Spoonbills ___White Ibis ___White-faced Ibis ___Roseate Spoonbill New World Vultures ___Black Vulture ___Turkey Vulture Hawks, Kites, Eagles, and Allies ___Osprey ___Swallow-tailed Kite ___Mississippi Kite ___Bald Eagle ___Northern Harrier ___Sharp-shinned Hawk ___Cooper’s Hawk ___Red-shouldered Hawk ___Broad-winged Hawk ___Swainson’s Hawk ___Red-tailed Hawk Caracaras and Falcons ___Crested Caracara ___American Kestrel ___Merlin ___Peregrine Falcon Rails and Coots ___Sora ___Purple Gallinule ___Common Gallinule ___American Coot Cranes ___Sandhill Crane Plovers ___Piping Plover ___Killdeer Stilts and Avocets ___Black-necked Stilt Sandpipers, Phalaropes, and Allies ___Spotted Sandpiper ___Greater Yellowlegs ___Lesser Yellowlegs ___Upland Sandpiper ___Western Sandpiper ___Least Sandpiper ___Baird’s Sandpiper ___Long-billed Dowitcher ___Wilson’s Snipe ___American Woodcock Northern parula © Paul Gregg Common Name Gulls and Terns ___Bonaparte’s Gull ___Laughing Gull ___Ring-billed Gull ___Least Tern ___Caspian Tern ___Foster’s Tern ___Royal Tern Pigeons and Doves ___Rock Pigeon ___Eurasian Collared-Dove ___White-winged Dove ___Mourning Dove ___Inca Dove Cuckoos ___Yellow-billed Cuckoo Typical Owls ___Eastern Screech-Owl ___Great Horned Owl ___Barred Owl Goatsuckers ___Common Nighthawk ___Chuck-will’s Widow Swifts ___Chimney Swift Hummingbirds ___Buff-bellied Hummingbird ___Ruby-throated Hummingbird Kingfishers ___Belted Kingfisher ___Green Kingfisher** Woodpeckers and Allies ___Red-headed Woodpecker ___Red-bellied Woodpecker ___Yellow-bellied Sapsucker ___Downy Woodpecker ___Hairy Woodpecker ___Northern Flicker ___Pileated Woodpecker Tyrant Flycatchers ___Olive-sided Flycatcher ___Eastern Wood-Pewee ___Acadian Flycatcher ___Least Flycatcher ___Eastern Phoebe ___Vermilion Flycatcher ___Ash-throated Flycatcher ___Great Crested Flycatcher ___Eastern Kingbird ___Scissor-tailed Flycatcher Shrikes ___Loggerhead Shrike Vireos ___White-eyed Vireo ___Yellow-throated Vireo ___Blue-headed Vireo ___Warbling Vireo ___Red-eyed Vireo Common Name Crows and Jays ___Blue Jay ___American Crow Swallows ___Purple Martin ___Tree Swallow ___Northern Rough-winged Swallow ___
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Butterflies of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge Established in 1994, the 25,000-acre Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge is a remnant of what was once a much larger, frequently flooded, bottomland hardwood forest. You are still able to view vast expanses of ridge and swale floodplain features, numerous bayous, oxbow lakes, and cypress/tupelo swamps along the Trinity River. It is one of only 14 priority-one bottomland sites identified for protection in the Texas Bottomland Protection Plan. This type of habitat is used during migration or nesting by nearly 50 percent of the migratory bird species listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Over 275 species of birds occur in the hardwood forest and associated wetlands in eastern Texas; while over 100 bird species are known to breed there. These forests also support a wide diversity of mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and fish including the federally listed bald eagle and alligator. For more information, visit our website: http://southwest.fws.gov/refuges/texas/ trinityriver Contact the Refuge staff if you should find an unlisted or rare species during your visit and provide a description. Creole Pearly-eye, (Enodia creola). Photograph by Mike Blessington/USFWS Swallowtails (Papilionidae) Pipevine Swallowtail Battus philenor Black Swallowtail Papilio polyxenes Giant Swallowtail Papilio cresphontes Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Papilio glaucus Spicebush Swallowtail Papilio troilus Palamedes Swallowtail Papilio palamedes Whites and Sulphurs (Pieridae) Checkered White Pontia protodice Great Southern White Ascia monuste Falcate Orangetip Paramidea midea Orange Sulphur Colias eurytheme Southern Dogface Colias cesonia Cloudless Sulphur Phoebis sennae Large Orange Sulphur Phoebis agarithe Little Yellow Eurema lisa Sleepy Orange Eurema nicippe Dainty Sulphur Nathalis iole Gossamer-winged Butterflies (Lycaenidae) Juniper Hairstreak Callophrys gryneus White-M Hairstreak Parrhasius melinus Gray Hairstreak Strymon melinus Red-banded Hairstreak Calycopis cecrops Dusky-blue Groundstreak Calycopis isobeon Ceraunus Blue Hemiargus ceraunus Reakirt’s Blue Hemiargus isola Eastern Tailed-Blue Everes comyntas Brush-footed Butterflies (Nymphalidae) American Snout Libytheana carinenta Gulf Fritillary Agraulis vanillae Julia Heliconian Dryus julia Zebra Heliconius charitonius Variegated Fritillary Euptoieta claudia Phaon Crescent Phycoides phaon Pearl Crescent Phycoides tharos Question Mark Polygonia interrogationis Mourning Cloak Nymphalis antiopa American Lady Vanessa virginiensis Painted Lady Vanessa cardui Red Admiral Vanessa atalanta Common Buckeye Junonia coenia Red-spotted Purple Limenitis arthemis astyanax Viceroy Limenitis archippus Goatweed Leafwing Anaea andria Hackberry Emperor Asterocampa celtis Funereal Duskywing, (Erynnis funeralis). Photograph by Garry Tucker/USFWS Brush-footed Butterflies, Cont. Tawny Emperor Asterocampa clyton Southern Pearly Eye Enodia portlandia Creole Pearly-eye Enodia creola Gemmed Satyr Cyllopsis gemma Carolina Satyr Hermeuptychia sosybius Little Wood-Satyr Megisto cymela Monarch Danaus plexippus Queen Danaus gilippus Skippers (Hesperiidae) Silver-spotted Skipper Epargyreus clarus White-striped Longtail Chiodes catillus Long-tailed skipper Urbanus proteus Dorantes Longtail Urbanus dorantes Northern Cloudywing Thorybes pylades Horace’s Duskywing Erynnis horatius Funereal Duskywing Erynnis funeralis Wild Indigo Duskywing Erynnis baptisiae Common Checkered-Skipper Pygrus communis Tropical Checkered-Skipper Pygrus oileus Swarthy Skipper Nastra lherminier A Black Swallowtail Caterpillar, (Papilio polyxenes). Photograph by Garry Tucker/USFWS Skippers, Cont. Neamathla Skipper Nastra neamathla Clouded Skipper Lerema accius Least Skipper Ancyloxypha numitor Southern Skipperling Copaeodes minimus Fiery Skipper Hylephila phyleus Whirabout Polites vibex Southern Broken-Dash Wallengrenia otho Northern Broken-Dash Wallengrenia egeremei Little Glassywing Pompeius verna Sachem Atalopedes campestris Yehl Skipper Poanes yehl Broad-winged Skipper Poanes viator Dukes’ Skipper Euphyes dukesi Dun Skipper Euphyes vestris Lace-winged Roadside Skipper Amblyscirtes aesculapius Eufala Skipper Lerodea eufala Ocola Skipper Panoquina ocola For further information Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge P.O. Box 10015 Liberty, TX 77575 936/336-9786 77 species as of November 2010
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Fishes of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge Established in 1994, the 30,000-acre Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge is a remnant of what was once a much larger, frequently flooded, bottomland hardwood forest. You are still able to view vast expanses of ridge and swale floodplain features, numerous bayous, oxbow lakes, and cypress/tupelo swamps along the Trinity River. It is one of only 14 priority-one bottomland sites identified for protection in the Texas Bottomland Protection Plan. This type of habitat is used during migration or nesting by nearly 50 percent of the migratory bird species listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Over 275 species of birds occur in the hardwood forest and associated wetlands in eastern Texas; while over 100 bird species are known to breed there. These forests also support a wide diversity of mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and fish including the federally listed bald eagle and alligator. Family Cyprinidae (Carps and Minnows) Grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) Red shiner (Cyprinella lutrensis) Blacktail shiner (C. venusta) Common carp (Cyprinus carpio) Ribbon shiner (Lythrurus fumeus) Golden shiner (Notemigonus crysoleucas) Blackspot shiner (Notropis atrocaudalis) Mimic shiner (N. volucellus) Pugnose minnow (Opsopoeodus emiliae) Bullhead minnow (Pimephales vigilax) Family Catostomidae (Suckers) Smallmouth buffalo (Ictiobus babalus) Blacktail redhorse (Moxostoma poecilurum) For more information, visit our website: www.fws.gov/refuge/trinity_river/ Family Ictaluridae (Bullhead catfishes) Black bullhead (Ameiurus melas) Yellow bullhead (A. natalis) Blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) Channel catfish (I. punctatus) Flathead catfish (Pylodictus olivaris) Contact the Refuge staff if you should find an unlisted or rare species during your visit and provide a description. Family Esocidae (Pickerels) Redfin (Chain) Pickerel (Esox americanus ) Family Lepisosteidae (Gars) Alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula) Spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus) Longnose gar (L. osseus) Family Aphredoderidae (Pirate perch) Pirate perch (Aphredoderus sayanus) Family Amiidae (Bowfin) Bowfin (Amia calva) Family Clupeidae (Shads) Gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum) Threadfin shad (D. petenense) Family Mugilidae (Mullets) Striped mullet (Mugil cephalus) Family Poeciliidae (Live bearers) Western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) Family Fundulidae (Killifishes) Golden topminnow (Fundulus chrysotus) Blackstripe topminnow (F. notatus) Blackspotted topminnow (F. olivaceus) Rainwater killifish (Lucania parva) Left, Bluegill. / USFWS Photograph Right, kids learn that fishing can be fun! © Shannon Tompkins, Houston Chronicle Family Moronidae (Temperate basses) White bass (Morone chrysops) Family Centrarchidae (Black basses and sunfishes) Flier (Centrarchus macropterus) Green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus) Warmouth (L. gulosus) Orangespotted sunfish (L. humilis) Bluegill (L. macrochirus) Longear sunfish (L. megalotis) Redear sunfish (L. microlophus) Spotted sunfish (L. punctatus) Bantam sunfish (L. symmetricus) Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) White crappie (Pomoxis annularis) Black crappie (P. nigromaculatus) Family Percidae (Walleye and darters) Bluntnose darter (Etheostoma chlorosomum) Slough darter (E. gracile) Family Sciaenidae (Drums) Freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens)
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Mammals of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge Established in 1994, the 25,000-acre Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge is a remnant of what was once a much larger, frequently flooded, bottomland hardwood forest. You are still able to view vast expanses of ridge and swale floodplain features, numerous bayous, oxbow lakes, and cypress/tupelo swamps along the Trinity River. It is one of only 14 priority-one bottomland sites identified for protection in the Texas Bottomland Protection Plan. This type of habitat is used during migration or nesting by nearly 50 percent of the migratory bird species listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Over 275 species of birds occur in the hardwood forest and associated wetlands in eastern Texas; while over 100 bird species are known to breed there. These forests also support a wide diversity of mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and fish including the federally listed bald eagle and alligator. For more information, visit our website: http://southwest.fws.gov/refuges/texas/ trinityriver Contact the Refuge staff if you should find an unlisted or rare species during your visit and provide a description. Order Didelphimorphia (Opossums) Family Didelphidae Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) Order Insectivora (Shrews and moles) Family Soricidae Short-tailed shrew (Blarina carolinensis) Least shrew (Cryptotis parva) Order Chiroptera (Bats) Family Vespertilionidae Southeastern myotis (Myotis austroriparous) Silver-haired bats (Lasionycteris noctivagans) Eastern pipistrelle (Pipistrellus subflavus) Big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus) Eastern red bat (Lasiurus borealis) Hoary bat (L. cinereus) Northern yellow bat (L. intermedius) Seminole bat (L. seminolus) Evening bat (Nycticeius humeralis) Rafinesque’s big-eared bat (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) Family Molossidae Mexican free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis) Order Xenarthra (Armadillos, sloths, and allies) Family Dasypodidae Nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcintus) Order Lagomorpha (Rabbits and hares) Family Leporidae Swamp rabbit (Sylvilagus aquaticus) Eastern cottontail (S. floridanus) Order Rodentia (Rodents) Family Sciuridae Eastern gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) Eastern fox squirrel (S. niger) Eastern flying squirrel (Glaucomys volans) Rafinesque’s big-eared bats with young pups, (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) Photograph by Laurie Lomas Fanily Geomyidae Attwater’s pocket gopher (Geomys attwateri) Baird’s pocket gopher (G. breviceps) Family Castoridae American beaver (Castor canadensis) Family Muridae Marsh rice rat (Oryzomys palustris) Fulvous harvest mouse (R. fulvescens) Eastern harvest mouse (R. humulis) Cotton mouse (Peromyscus gossypinus) White-footed mouse (P. leucopus) Deer mouse (P. maniculatus) Golden mouse (Ochrotomys nuttali) Hispid cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) Eastern woodrat (Neotoma floridana) Common muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus) Family Myocastoridae Nutria (Myocastor coypus) Order Carnivora (Carnivores) Family Canidae Coyote (Canis latrans) Red fox (Vulpes vulpes) Common gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) Family Procyonidae Common raccoon (Procyon lotor) Family Mustelidae Eastern spotted skunk (Spirogale putorius) Striped skunk (Mephitus mephitus) River otter (Lutra canadensis) Family Felidae Bobcat (Lynx rufus) Order Artiodactyla (Even-toed ungulates) Family Suidae Feral pig (Sus scrofa) Family Cervidae White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) May 2009
U.S. Fish U.S. Fish&&Wildlife Wildlife Service Service Moths of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge Established in 1994, the nearly 30,000-acre Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge is a remnant of what was once a much larger, frequently flooded, bottomland hardwood forest. You are still able to view vast expanses of ridge and swale floodplain features, numerous bayous, oxbow lakes, and cypress/tupelo swamps along the Trinity River. It is one of only 14 priority-one bottomland sites identified for protection in the Texas Bottomland Protection Plan. Texas is home to an estimated 4,000 species of moths. Most of the over 600 species of moths listed below were photographed around the security lights at the Refuge Headquarters building located adjacent to a bottomland hardwood forest. Many more moths are not even attracted to lights, so additional surveys will need to be conducted to document those species. These forests also support a wide diversity of mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and fish with many feeding on moths or their larvae. For more information, visit our website: www.fws.gov/southwest Contact the Refuge staff if you should find an unlisted or rare species during your visit and provide a description and photograph. Hodges Numbers can be found on the MPG Species List at: mothphotographersgroup.msstate.edu/ species_list.php#1 Hodges Species No. Opostegidae 122 Pseudopostega quadristrigella Common Name Gooseberry Barkminer Moth Tineidae—Clothes Moths 279 Diachorisia velatella 300 Hybroma servulella 301 Yellow Wave Moth Homostinea curviliniella 317 Xylesthia pruniramiella 319 Kearfottia albifasciella Clemens’ Bark Moth Acrolophidae—Burrowing Webworm Moths 335 Amydria margoriella 355.1 Acrolophus heppneri 366 Acrolophus mortipennella 367.1 Acrolophus mycetophagus Frilly Grass Tubeworm Moth 371 Acrolophus piger Piger Grass Tubeworm Moth 373 Acrolophus popeanella Clemens’ Grass Tubeworm Moth 383 Acrolophus texanella Texas Grass Tubeworm Moth Tineidae—Clothes Moths 392 Tinea apicimaculella Psychidae—Bagworm Moths 441 Cryptothelea nigrita 442 Cryptothelea gloverii Nigrita Bagworm Moth Gracillariidae—Leaf Blotch Miner Moths 639 Caloptilia stigmatella 644.1 Caloptilia triadicae 802.97 Phyllonorycter sp. Elachistidae—Grass Miner Moths 889 Agonopterix argillacea Autostichidae 1010.1 Autosticha kyotensis Elachistidae—Grass Miner Moths Kyoto Moth 1011 Antaeotricha schlaegeri Schlaeger’s Fruitworm Moth 1014 Antaeotricha leucillana Pale Gray Bird-dropping Moth Oecophoridae—Concealer Moths 1034 Inga sparsiciliella 1046 Epicallima argenticinctella Orange-headed Epicallima Moth Black-marked Inga Moth Autostichidae 1134.1 Spinitibia hodgesi Glyphidoceridae 1136.1 Glyphidocera juniperella 1139 Glyphidocera lactiflosella Juniper Tip Moth Five-spotted Glyphidocera Moth Blastobasidae—Scavenger Moths 1162 Blastobasis glandulella Batrachedridae 1422 Homaledra sabalella Acorn Moth Palm Leaf Skeletonizer Moth Momphidae 1434 Mompha circumscriptella Circumscript Mompha Moth 1443 Mompha eloisella Red-streaked Mompha Moth 1448 Mompha murtfeldtella Cosmopterigidae—Cosmet Moths 1528 Triclonella bicoloripennis 1623 Perimede erransella Xyloryctidae 1678 Scythris trivinctella Banded Scythris Moth Gelechiidae—Twirler Moths 1702 Isophrictis similiella 1716 Monochroa quinquepunctella 1733.1 Aristotelia corallina 1762 Aristotelia rubidella 1771 Agnippe prunifoliella 1809 Coleotechnites florae Coleotechnites Flower Moth Autostichidae 1845 Taygete gallaegenitella Gelechiidae—Twirler Moths 1857 Pubitelphusa latifasciella 1922.2 Bryotropha galbanella 1986 Gnorimoschema gallaesolidaginis 2052 Frumenta nundinella 2071 Chionodes dentella 2072 Chionodes discoocellella Eyeringed Chionodes Moth 2209 Stegasta bosqueella Red-necked Peanutworm Moth 2211 Polyhymno luteostrigella Polyhymno Moth 2223 Untomia albistrigella 2229.96 Battaristis n. sp. 2233 Anacampsis conclusella 2234 Anacampsis coverdalella 2236 Anacampsis fullonella 2265 Helcystogramma chambersella 2288 Dichomeris punctipennella Goldenrod Gall Moth Undescribed—Battaristis Coverdale’s Anacampsis Moth Many-spotted Dichomeris Moth Glyphipterigidae 2336.2 Plutellidae 2366 Drymoana blanchardi Plutella xylostella Yponomeutidae 2401 Atteva aurea Diamondback Moth Ailanthus Webworm Moth Lacturidae—Tropical Burnet Moths 2404 Lactura basistriga 2405 Lactura pupula 2407 Lactura subfervens Bumelia Leafworm Moth Urodidae 2415 Urodus parvula Bumelia Webworm Moth Cossidae—Carpenter and Leopard Moths 2661 Givira arbeloides 2668 Givira anna Anna Carpenterworm Moth 2674 Cossula magnifica Pecan Carpenterworm Moth 2693 Prionoxystus robiniae Carpenterworm Moth 2694 Prionoxystus macmurtrei Little Carpenterworm Moth Tortricidae—Tortricid Moths 2701 Episimus argutanus Sumac Leaftier Moth 2703 Episimus tyrius Maple Tip Borer Moth 270
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Plants of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge The Trinity River NWR plant list was developed by Larry E. Brown, Guy Nesom, Stuart J. Marcus and David Rosen. As of April 2009, 632 plants have been documented. Acanthaceae, Acanthus Family Dicliptera brachiata Hygrophila lacustris Lake Acanthus Justica ovata var. lanceolata Lance-Leaved Water Willow Ruellia caroliniensis Wild Petunia R. humilis var. humilis Low Ruellia R. strepens Wild Petunia Aceraceae, Maple Family Acer negundo Ash-Leaved Maple A. rubrum Red Maple Alismataceae, Water Plantain Family Echinodorus cordifolius Sagittaria montevidensis Arrowhead S. papillosa Arrowhead S. platyphylla Arrowhead Amaranthaceae, Amaranth Family Alternanthera philoxeroides Alligator-Weed Amaranthus rudis Water Hemp A. spinosus Spiny Amaranth A. viridis Slender Amaranth Amaryllidaceae, Amaryllis Family Cooperia pedunculata Rain-lily Crinum americanum Spider Lily Hymenocallis liriosme Spider Lily Hypoxis curtisii Yellow-star grass Lyoris radiate Red Spider-Lily Anacardiaceae, Cashew Family Toxicodendron radicans Poison Ivy Apocynaceae, Dogbane Family Trachelospermum difforme Climbing Dogbane Aquifoliaceae, Holly Family Ilex deciduas Deciduous-Leaved Holly I. opaca American Holly I. vomitoria Yaupon Araceae, Arum Family Arisaema dracontium Green Dragon Araliaceae, Ginseng Family Aralia spinosa Hercules Club Asclepiadaceae, Milkweed Family Asclepias perennis Swamp Milkweed Matelea gonocarpa Milkvine Azollaceae, Water Fern Family Azolla caroliniana Mosquito Fern Berberidaceae, Barberry Family Podophyllum peltatum Mayapple Betulaceae, Birch Family Carpinus caroliniana Ironwood Ostrya virginiana Hop Hornbeam Bignoniaceae, Trumpet Creeper Family Bignonia capreolata Crossvine Campsis radicans Trumpet Creeper Catalpa speciosa Northern Catalpa Boraginaceae, Borage Family Heliotropium indicum Turnsole H. procumbens Heliotrope Myosotis macrosperma Forget-Me-Not Bromeliaceae, Pineapple Family Tillandsia recurvata Ball Moss T. usneoides Spanish Moss Callitrichaceae, Water Starwort Family Callitriche heterophylla Larger Water-Starwort C. nuttallii Sand-Starwort C. peploides Water-Starwort Campanulaceae, Bellflower Family Lobelia cardinalis Cardinal Flower L. puberula Downy Lobelia Sphenoclea zeylanica Chickenspike Triodanis perfoliata var. biflora Venus-Looking-Glass T. perfoliata var. perfoliata Cannaceae, Canna Family Canna indica Indian Shot Caprifoliaceae, Honeysuckle Family Lonicera japonica Japanese Honeysuckle Sambucus canadensis Elderberry Viburnum rufidulum Rusty Black Haw Caryophyllaceae, Pink Family Cerastium glomeratum Mouse-Eared Chickweed Sagina decumbens Pearlwort Silene antirrhina Sleepy Catchfly Stellaria media Chickweed S. parvan Chickweed Celastraceae, Staff Tree Family Euonymus americanus Strawberry Bush Ceratophyllaceae, Coon-Tail Family Ceratophyllum demersum, Coon-Tail Chenopodiaceae, Goosefoot Family Chenopodium ambrosioides Mexican Tea Commelinaceae, Spiderwort Family Commelina diffusa Spreading Dayflower C. erecta Dayflower C. virginica Virginia Dayflower Murdannia nudiflora Tradescantia ohiensis Spiderwort Compositae, Sunflower Family Acmella oppositifolia var. repens Creeping Spotflower Ambrosia artemisiifolia Ragweed A. cumanensis Western Ragweed A. trifida Giant Ragweed Aster fragilis Tall White Aster A. subulatus Blueweed Baccharis halimifolia Sea-Myrtle Bidens bipinnata Spanish Needles B. discoidea Sticktight Cacalia plantaginea Indian Plantian Calyptocarpus vialis Stagger Daisy Chloracantha spinosa var. spinosa Spiny Aster Cirsium horridulum Bull Thistle Conyza canadensis Horseweed Coreopsis basalis Goldenwave Croptilon rigidifolium Scratch-Daisy Eclipta prostrata Yerba De Tago Elephantopus carolinianus Elephantfoot E. tomentosus Elephantfoot Erechtities hieraciifolia Burnweed Erigeron philadelphicus Philadelphia Fleabane E. tenuis Slender Fleabane Eupatorium capillifolium Dogfennel E. coelestinum Mist Flower E. compositifolium Yankee Weed E. incarnatum Pink Boneset E. rugosum Boneset E. serotinum Lateflowering Boneset Euthamia leptocephala False Goldenrod Gaillardia pulchella var. pulchella Indian Blanket Gnaphalium falcatum Cudweed G. purpureum Cudweed Helenium amarum var. amarum Bitterweed Heterotheca subaxillaris Goldenaster Hypochaeris microcephala var. albiflora Cat’s Ear Iva annua Marsh Elder Krigia cespitosa Dwarf Dandelion K. wrightii Sandy Soil Dwarf Dandelion Lactuca canadensis Wild Lettuce L. floridana Fall Wild Lettuce Mikania scandens Hempweed Pluchea camphorata Camphorweed Pterocaulon virgatum Blackroot Polymnia uvedalia Bearsfoot Pyrrhopappus carolinianus False Dandelion P. pauciflorus False Dandelion Rudbeckia hirta Black-Eyed Susan Senecio glabellus Butter-Weed S. tampicanus Butter-Weed Solidago canadensis Goldenrod S. rugosa Roughleaf Goldenrod Soliva sessilis Burweed Sonchus asper Sow Thistle Verbesina encelioides Cowpen Daisy V. virginica Frostweed Vernonia missurica Ironweed Xanthium s

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