Jordanelle

Dark Sky

brochure Jordanelle - Dark Sky
“Stars can’t shine without darkness.” D.H. Sidebottom, Fragile Truths Your park fees provide for the care, protection, and enhancement of this park. Jordanelle State Park S.R. 319 #515 Box 4, Heber City, UT 84032 Phone: 435-649-9540 Online: stateparks.utah.gov and on Facebook Utah State Parks Mission: To enhance the quality of life by preserving and providing natural, cultural and recreational resources for the enjoyment, education and inspiration of this and future generations. Jordanelle State Park Protecting natural darkness and starry skies What is Light Pollution? Excessive use of artificial light. Glare – visual discomfort from excessive brightness. Urban sky glow – the brightening of the night sky from artificial light over inhabited areas. Light trespass – light falling where it is not intended, wanted, or needed. Enjoy the Park’s Night Sky “In the ‘shooting’ showers of blazing dust and ice, we have always found beauty.” Paul Bogard, The End of Night: Searching for Natural Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light 99 Test your skills and take a journey through our Solar System Geocache. 99 View stars, distant planets, and other celestial objects. 99 Learn about the preservation and stewardship of dark skies. 99 Visit our website for scheduled Dark Sky events such as star parties. Milky Way over Jordanelle State Park, courtesy of Eric Benedetti Star party photo, courtesy of NPS/Chris Wonderly Owl photo, courtesy of USFWS Mountain-Prarie Orion images, courtesy of GLOBE at Night Utah State Parks Light Courtesy in the Park Poor Unshielded light Enjoy the Benefits of Darker Skies Better Partial light shield Best Full light shield The Milky Way is vanishing from urban neighborhoods, but dark sky friendly choices improve: 99 Night vision and safety. 99 Courtesy between neighbors. 99 Nesting areas for birds. 99 Energy cost and efficiency. 99 Views of the stars. Notice Lights in the Park Belt Belt Orion’s Belt Jordanelle State Park implements money and energy saving lighting choices by using: True Dark Belt Dark Dark sky friendly Belt 99 Fully shielded light fixtures. 99 Lighting only where needed. 99 Motion sensors, solar sensors, and timers. 99 Low wattage LED bulbs. 99 Amber and warm white bulbs. Wildlife at Night An animal’s ability to forage, hunt, migrate, and sleep relies on the rhythm of daylight and natural darkness. True Dark Rural City Can you see the constellation Orion from your home? Set Out to Stargaze ‰‰ Chart your start - Study a star chart before you set out. Choose a celestial object and find out what time it will it be in view. Bring Dark Skies Home ‰‰ Bundle up - Mountain temperatures drop dramatically after sunset. If you would like to take steps to protect your night sky, try following these simple guidelines: ‰‰ Bring out the blankets and pull up a chair Looking straight up can be a pain in the neck. ‰‰ Light only where you need it. ‰‰ Lights out - Switch flashlights off or to red. It takes 15 minutes to develop your night vision to see fainter stars. ‰‰ Shield lights and direct them downward. ‰‰ Sky landmarks - Use the North Star as a landmark to find constellations and objects in the sky. ‰‰ Find it in the sky - Star formations, planets, meteors, and satellites. ‰‰ Light only when you need it. ‰‰ Use the minimum amount of light necessary. ‰‰ Use light bulbs with a color temperature of 3000K or lower. ‰‰ Keep indoor light inside. Close blinds and curtains when lights are on at night.

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