Bears Ears

National Monument - Utah

Bears Ears National Monument is a United States National Monument located in San Juan County in southeastern Utah. The monument protects 1,351,849 acres of public land surrounding the Bears Ears, a pair of mesas.

maps

Visitor Map (southern part) of the BLM Moab Field Office area in Utah. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Moab - Visitor Map - South

Visitor Map (southern part) of the BLM Moab Field Office area in Utah. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of Peavine, Dark and Rig Canyons and Gooseberry Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails. Published by San Juan County.San Juan County OHV - Peavine, Dark and Rig Canyons and Gooseberry

Map of Peavine, Dark and Rig Canyons and Gooseberry Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails. Published by San Juan County.

Map of Beef Basin and White Rim Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails. Published by San Juan County.San Juan County OHV - Beef Basin and White Rim

Map of Beef Basin and White Rim Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails. Published by San Juan County.

Map of Hook and Ladder Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails. Published by San Juan County.San Juan County OHV - Hook and Ladder

Map of Hook and Ladder Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails. Published by San Juan County.

Map of Two Mile, Slaughter Flat and La Sal/Geyser Pass Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails. Published by San Juan County.San Juan County OHV - Two Mile, Slaughter Flat and La Sal/Geyser Pass

Map of Two Mile, Slaughter Flat and La Sal/Geyser Pass Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails. Published by San Juan County.

Map of the San Juan County Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Travel Plan and Trail System. Published by San Juan County.San Juan County OHV - OHV Travel Plan and Trails

Map of the San Juan County Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Travel Plan and Trail System. Published by San Juan County.

Bears Ears NM https://www.blm.gov/programs/national-conservation-lands/utah/bears-ears-national-monument https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bears_Ears_National_Monument Bears Ears National Monument is a United States National Monument located in San Juan County in southeastern Utah. The monument protects 1,351,849 acres of public land surrounding the Bears Ears, a pair of mesas.
BEARS EARS NATIONAL MONUMENT Visitor Information - Frequently asked Questions BLM-UTAH Is there a fee for visiting the National Monument? There are no entrance fees to the National Monument. However, day use and overnight permits ($2 to $5 per person) are required for many of the Cedar Mesa Canyons, including Grand Gulch. Permits are also required to float the San Juan River which is partially within the National Monument. Additional information on permits can be found on the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Bears Ears National Monument website. https://on.doi.gov/2o8XI60 What is there to see and do in the National Monument? Bears Ears National Monument offers a unique opportunity to visit ancestral Puebloan cultural sites, including spectacular rock art sites and the remains of prehistoric family dwellings, granaries, kivas, towers, and large villages. These sites are fragile and irreplaceable and need to be treated with care. Some sites are accessible by motorized vehicle, while other sites are only accessible by foot. The National Monument contains many rugged areas and road conditions are variable. Even sites that are accessible by vehicle may require high clearance vehicles. In addition to cultural sites, the National Monument includes deep sandstone canyons, desert mesas, and mountain tops that provide outstanding scenery. Some of the most notable geologic features include Indian Creek, Comb Ridge, White Canyon, Valley 2 of the Gods, the San Juan River, and the Cedar Mesa canyons. Day use and overnight permits are required for many of the Cedar Mesa canyons, including Grand Gulch. This area is managed for a more primitive type of recreation. Permits can be obtained through the BLM Monticello Field Office. Some of the most frequently visited and accessible sites are identified on the existing 2016 Monticello Field Office Recreation Map, available for sale at the Monticello Field Office. Needles and Anticline Overlook - The Needles and Anticline Overlooks provide excellent views of Canyonlands National Park and the Indian Creek area. A marked gravel road off highway 191 about 32 miles south of Moab leads to both viewpoints. Bridges National Monument is a popular canyoneering destination. Additional information on day hikes from Highway 95 can be found at the following location: Indian Creek/Newspaper Rock - Indian Creek Special Recreation Management Area, which can be accessed by Highway 211, is the gateway to the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park. This scenic area includes world-renowned rock climbing. There are also several side canyons and petroglyph panels. Newspaper rock is the most accessible panel, and includes an abundance of rock art representing a variety of cultures. Kane Gulch - At the Kane Gulch Ranger Station visitors can view a Sand Island petroglyph panel/River House Ruins - The Sand Island petroglyph panel is located in the BLM’s Sand Island Recreational Area, just three miles west of Bluff, Utah. The River House Ruin is a cliff dwelling along the San Juan River that is accessible by river or in a high clearance vehicle. https://on.doi.gov/2mQAEZS rock art exhibit. From the Ranger Station (located on State Route 261), you can hike down the Kane Gulch trail and into Grand Gulch. It is 4 miles one way to the junction of Kane and Grand Gulches and the trail drops approximately 600 feet in elevation. At this intersection, you can view a cliff dwelling called Junction Ruin. If you decide to continue, in the next mile you can see Turkey Pen Ruin and Stimper Arch. Kane Gulch Ranger Station to Stimper Arch is approximately 10 miles roundtrip. It is a full day hike for most people. Valley of the Gods - The Valley of the Gods contains beautiful Cedar Mesa sandstone monoliths, pinnacles and other geologi- Highway 95 - There are several day hikes off of Highway 95 that provide access to ruins including Arch Canyon, Butler Wash, and Mule Canyon. Highway 95 also crosses Comb Ridge and parallels White Canyon. Comb Ridge is a 120-mile long monocline that was designated as a National Natural Landmark in 1976. During the Hole-in-the-Rock expedition, Mormon pioneers were required to cross this barrier. White Canyon, which runs through Natural cal features. The 17-mile loop through the Valley of the Gods is a graded gravel and clay surface road. This road can be accessed from either Utah Highway 261 or U.S. Highway 163. Driving time is approximately one to two hours. Where is the National Monument? The National Monument is located in southeast Utah’s canyon country, in San Juan County. Nearby towns include Monticello, Blanding, and Bluff, Utah. 3 Can I ride my ATV or motorcycle in the National Monument? Where can I see the Bears Ears? The National Monument provides outstanding opportunities for motorized recreation. All roads and trails that were open prior to the monument designation (approximately 1,800 miles) continue to be open to motorized use. As part of the managemen

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