Anasazi

State Park Museum - Utah

Anasazi State Park Museum is a state park and museum in Southern Utah featuring the ruins of an ancient Anasazi village referred to as the Coombs Village Site.

maps

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of Fremont River Ranger District (Teasdale Portion) in Fishlake National Forest (NF) in Utah. Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS).Fishlake MVTM - Fremont River Teasdale Portion 2020

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of Fremont River Ranger District (Teasdale Portion) in Fishlake National Forest (NF) in Utah. Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of Escalante Ranger District in Dixie National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Dixie MVTM - Escalante 2019

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of Escalante Ranger District in Dixie National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Fremont River Ranger District (South) in Fishlake National Forest (NF) in Utah. Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS).Fishlake MVUM - Fremont River South 2015

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Fremont River Ranger District (South) in Fishlake National Forest (NF) in Utah. Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Escalante Ranger District in Dixie National Forest (NF) in Utah. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).,Dixie MVUM - Escalante 2021

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Escalante Ranger District in Dixie National Forest (NF) in Utah. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).,

brochures

Brochure of Anasazi State Park Museum in Utah. Published by Utah State Parks.Anasazi - Brochure

Brochure of Anasazi State Park Museum in Utah. Published by Utah State Parks.

Utah State Parks Field Guide. Published by Utah State Parks.Utah State Parks - Field Guide

Utah State Parks Field Guide. Published by Utah State Parks.

Anasazi SPM https://stateparks.utah.gov/parks/anasazi/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anasazi_State_Park_Museum Anasazi State Park Museum is a state park and museum in Southern Utah featuring the ruins of an ancient Anasazi village referred to as the Coombs Village Site.
UTAH STATE PARKS Anasazi State Park Museum Cultural Resources T he Four Corners area contains archeological and historical evidence of people who lived from hundreds to thousands of years ago. These fragile and irreplaceable clues to the past provide opportunities for the professional and nonprofessional alike to study how prehistoric people lived. Please treat the sites with respect, consideration, and care to ensure that future generations have a chance to appreciate our heritage. Address inquiries to: Anasazi State Park Museum PO Box 1429 Boulder, UT 84716-1429 (435) 335-7308 Utah State Parks and Recreation PO Box 146001 Salt Lake City, UT 84114-6001 (801) 538-7220 (877) UT-PARKS (801) 538-7458 (TTY) www.stateparks.utah.gov Utah State Parks mission… To enhance the quality of life through outdoor recreation, leisure and educational experiences. Museum hours: May 16 – September 15 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. September 16 – May 15 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The park is closed New Year’s Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas. Anasazi State Park Museum is in south central Utah along Utah Highway 12 in the beautiful ranching community of Boulder. The Utah Department of Natural Resources receives federal aid and prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, age, national origin or disability. For information or complaints regarding discrimination, contact Executive Director, Utah Department of Natural Resources, PO Box 145610, Salt Lake City, UT 841145610 or Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, 1801 L Street, NW, Washington, DC 20507-0001. Anasazi state park museum Who Were Coombs Site Excavation Village Abandonment uring the 15th and 16th centuries, the Navajo arrived in what is now the southwestern United States. Anasazi is a Navajo word interpreted to mean ancient enemies or enemy ancestors. M V Ancestors of their foe, the modern Pueblo Indians, inhabited the area prior to the Navajo. What the Anasazi called themselves, however, probably never will be known. More recently, some archeologists adopted the term Ancestral Pueblo, which suggests common ties with modern Pueblos. Excavations uncovered 97 rooms, 10 pit structures, and hundreds of thousands of artifacts. Although major structures have been identified, only about half the site has been investigated. Outlines of unexcavated rooms can be glimpsed across the site. Future excavations would undoubtedly modify some interpretations of the site. the Anasazi? D Although Ancestral Pueblo is probably more accurate, archeologists have used the term Anasazi for many decades, and it now is generally accepted. It refers to villagedwelling farmers who existed in the southern Colorado Plateau of the Four Corners region of Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, and southern Nevada between about A.D. 1 and 1300. ajor excavations at the Coombs Site were undertaken by the University of Utah in 1958 and 1959. Small-scale excavations occurred in 1927 by the Peabody Museum and again by state parks staff between 1970 and 1991. Puebloan Life I nhabitants of this site maintained cultural ties with the Kayenta Anasazi region of northeastern Arizona. However, trade items from Mesa Verde, Chaco Canyon, western Utah, and Arizona imply contact with many different people. Tree ring dates indicate that timbers used in structures were cut between A.D. 1129 and 1169, suggesting the site was in use during the middle of the 12th century. illage inhabitants departed about A.D. 1175 and never returned. Some possible causes may have been resource exhaustion, pressure from outsiders or population growth. Whatever the reason or reasons, the region was not reoccupied until the latter part of the 19th century. At or shortly after abandonment, the village was burned, possibly by the inhabitants. The villagers’ fate is unclear, but they may have returned to the Kayenta region and reestablished themselves. A short trail from the visitor center leads to the Coombs Site Ruins and a life-size, sixroom replica of part of the pueblo. The replica gives the visitor an idea of what life was like for the Anasazi between 800 and 900 years ago. Museum Unexcavated Portion of Ruin I nteractive exhibits provide visitors the opportunity to grind corn using a mano and metate, identify seeds with a microscope, make Coombs Site Ruins N More resources were available in this area than at many ancestral Pueblo villages. Inhabitants raised corn, beans, and squash but also depended upon wild game and native plants to supplement their diets. Surrounding mountains and canyons contained bighorn sheep, deer, small game and various plants that produced seeds, nuts and berries. In spite of these advantages, life for ancestral Puebloans was tough by modern standards. Men averaged 5 feet 4 inches tall and women 5 feet 2 inches. Few people lived past 45 years, and average life expectancy was 33 to 35 years. Tooth decay and arthritis were frequent diseases. Famine may have been a constant challange and quite
Wasatch-Cashe N.F. Brigham City re at 43 Sa Weber lt La ke Davis 24 Salt Lake Tooele 25 ah 13 Wasatch Duchesne iv n Uintah ee Juab Gr 35 15 Ashley N.F. Uinta N.F. Nephi Price Manti-La Sal N.F. Carbon 44 Volunteers improve, protect, and preserve Utah State Parks. Individuals and couples may serve as camp hosts, greeters, educators, and interpreters. Families, service groups, and clubs are needed for fun and important projects. For volunteer opportunities call 801-538-7220 or email parksvolunteer@utah.gov. Delta 22 29 Fish Lake N.F. 27 Manti Gunnison 38 Millard Castle Dale 19 Grand Emery Green River 70 Richfield Sevier 14 Utah State Parks administers Utah’s boating program, including education, user compliance, accident investigation, and search and rescue. Utah law requires children under 13 years old to wear lifejackets when on a boat. Know the laws and navigation rules, and carry all required and suggested safety equipment. Sanpete Manti-La Sal N.F. Fillmore BOATING Arches N.P. 16 6 15 Beaver Beaver Fish Lake N.F.Junction 28 Capitol Reef N.P. Loa Wayne Hanksville Canyonlands N.P. Piute OFF-HIGHWAY VEHICLES Dixie N.F. Cedar Breaks N.M. Cedar City Bryce Canyon N.P. 36 Washington St. George do Ri er Manti-La Sal N.F. ra Co lo Monticello 10 Garfield 26 Boulder Natural Bridges N.R.A. Blanding Arches N.P. San Juan Glen Canyon N.R.A. 31 Zion N.P. Hurricane 34 17 Grand Staircase-Escalante N.M. Kane 5 La 20 11 Panguitch Parowan v 1 Dixie N.F. 15 Moab 30 Milford Iron Dinosaur N.M. 40 Uinta N.F. Utah Ut 37 Vernal Orem Provo 32 Wasatch-Cashe N.F. 7 Payson VOLUNTEERING ke Po w e l l Kanab UTAH STATE PARKS FIELD GUIDE STATEPARKS.UTAH.GOV CONTACT Utah State Parks and Recreation Administrative Office 1594 W. North Temple, Suite 116 P.O. Box 146001 Salt Lake City, Utah 84114-6001 801-538-7220 stateparks.utah.gov parkcomment@utah.gov FOR RESERVATIONS CALL: 801-322-3770 or toll-free 800-322-3770 OUR MISSION To enhance the quality of life by preserving and providing natural, cultural, and recreational resources for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations. YOUR PARK FEES PROVIDE FOR THE CARE, PROTECTION, AND ENHANCEMENT OF STATE PARKS. Photos: Utah State Parks and Recreation Information contained in this brochure was accurate at the time of printing. Policies, facilities, fees, hours and regulations, etc. change as mandated. For updated information, please contact the park or visit our website at stateparks.utah.gov. The Utah Department of Natural Resources receives federal aid and prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, age, national origin, or disability. For information or complaints regarding discrimination, contact: Executive Director, Utah Department of Natural Resources, P.O. Box 145610, Salt Lake City, UT 84114-5610 or Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, 1801 L Street, NW, Washington DC 20507-001. 03/19 Daggett Ashley N.F. Duchesne 42 41 Wasatch N.F. Utah State Parks is committed to accessibility in our programs, services, events, and facilities. For information about accessibility call 801-538-7220. Accessible campsites can be reserved online at utahstateparks.reserveamerica.com or by calling 1-800-322-3770. Stroll the boardwalks of Rock Cliff at Jordanelle, hike the trail of Sleeping Rainbows at Escalante Petrified Forest, and ride through lava flows at Snow Canyon. Explore state parks on foot, bike, or horseback. Always wear sturdy shoes and layered clothing, and carry water, sunscreen, and a first-aid kit. 33 Flaming Gorge N.R.A. Manila Summit Coalville Heber City 4 80 21 Salt Lake City Park City Lake Tooele 12 9 8 Morgan 39 80 ACCESSIBILITY TRAILS, HIKING, BIKING, AND HORSEBACK RIDING 84 Farmington 18 Wasatch-Cashe N.F. Morgan Ogden 2 Wendover The Heritage Program helps protect, preserve, research, and interpret our unique cultural and natural history resources for the enjoyment and education of all. We have Pony Express stops, dinosaur skeletons, and everything in between. Come travel back in time with us at our seven museums and many historical and paleontological areas. Rich er G To see what park passes are available and the qualifications for each pass, please visit stateparks.utah.gov/passes. Utah State Parks administers summer and winter off-highway vehicle (OHV) programs, including education, trail maintenance, grant programs, user compliance, accident investigations, and search and rescue. Always wear a helmet! (Helmets are required for riders 17 and under by Utah state law.) Operators ages 8–15 must possess an OHV education certificate. For more information, visit ohv.utah.gov. Utah State Parks Rainbow Bridge N.M. Hovenweep N.M. Bluff 41 42 43 44 UTAH STATE PARKS: SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE! Explore the history and beauty of Utah’s state parks. Venture back in time through discovery of

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