Goblin Valley

State Park - Utah

Goblin Valley State Park lies within the San Rafael Desert southeast of the east limb of the San Rafael Swell and north of the Henry Mountains. Utah State Route 24 passes about four miles east of the park. Hanksville lies 12 miles to the south. Its eminent feature is its thousands of hoodoos and hoodoo rocks, referred to locally as "goblins", which are formations of mushroom-shaped rock pinnacles, some as high as several meters. The distinct shapes of these rocks come from an erosion-resistant layer of rock atop softer sandstone. Along with Bryce Canyon National Park some 190 miles to the southwest, Goblin Valley State Park is one location with some of the highest occurrences of hoodoos in the world. Hiking is permitted in the park, which features three marked trails.

maps

Official Visitor Map of Capitol Reef National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Capitol Reef - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Capitol Reef National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of BLM Campsites near Moab south of South of I-70 in the BLM Moab Field Office area in Utah. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Moab - BLM Moab Camping

Map of BLM Campsites near Moab south of South of I-70 in the BLM Moab Field Office area in Utah. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Travel Map of Fremont River area in the BLM Henry Mountains Field Station area. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Fremont River - Travel Map

Travel Map of Fremont River area in the BLM Henry Mountains Field Station area. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Utah State Parks Field Guide. Published by Utah State Parks.Utah State Parks - Field Guide

Utah State Parks Field Guide. Published by Utah State Parks.

Goblin Valley SP https://stateparks.utah.gov/parks/goblin-valley/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goblin_Valley_State_Park Goblin Valley State Park lies within the San Rafael Desert southeast of the east limb of the San Rafael Swell and north of the Henry Mountains. Utah State Route 24 passes about four miles east of the park. Hanksville lies 12 miles to the south. Its eminent feature is its thousands of hoodoos and hoodoo rocks, referred to locally as "goblins", which are formations of mushroom-shaped rock pinnacles, some as high as several meters. The distinct shapes of these rocks come from an erosion-resistant layer of rock atop softer sandstone. Along with Bryce Canyon National Park some 190 miles to the southwest, Goblin Valley State Park is one location with some of the highest occurrences of hoodoos in the world. Hiking is permitted in the park, which features three marked trails.
Goblin Valley State Park Your park fees provide for the care, protection and enhancement of this park. Park Location: The park is located 50 miles southwest of Green River off State Highway 24. Operating Hours: The park is open 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. year-round. Address Inquiries To: Goblin Valley State Park PO Box 637 Green River, UT 84525 (435) 275-4584 or Utah State Parks and Recreation P.O. Box 146001 Salt Lake City, UT 84114-6001 (801) 538-7220 stateparks.utah.gov For Reservations Call: (800) 322-3770 Utah State Parks Mission: To enhance the quality of life by preserving and providing natural, cultural and recreational resources for the enjoyment, education and inspiration of this and future generations. Information contained in this brochure was accurate at the time of printing. Policies, facilities, fees, hours and regulations, etc., change as mandated. For updated information please contact the park. Printed on recycled paper 07/17 Utah State Parks Guidelines Activities Please observe the following park regulations to ensure everyone’s visit is pleasant. Goblin Valley allows visitors to explore and meander among and in between the goblins, and offers three trails: Camping - Camp only in designated areas. Each permit covers one vehicle and any attached recreational equipment. There is an extra fee for additional vehicles or camping equipment. Up to eight people are allowed in a campsite. Carmel Canyon - A 1.5-mile moderately strenuous loop leading from the parking area to the desert floor. Along the way, visitors see Goblin Valley from different perspectives. Optional hike to Molly’s Castle Overlook. Curtis Bench - A fairly easy 2.1-mile out and back trail that follows the Curtis formation. The trail offers a unique overview of Goblin Valley as well as spectacular views of the Henry Mountains. Entrada Canyon - An adventuresome, moderately strenuous 1.3-mile one-way trail from the campground to the goblins and back. The trail follows a natural drainage that lends itself to those who enjoy discovering what is around the next corner. Fires - Campfires may be built in specified areas. Most developed campsites provide camp stoves or charcoal facilities. Firewood is available for sale at the Visitor Center. Weather Clear desert skies offer spectacular views of the desert floor and San Rafael Reef. Low humidity and sparse vegetation allow evenings to cool off rapidly. Summer - Temperatures can reach to 90s to low 100s during the day and fall to the mid 60s at night. Afternoon thundershowers in late summer cool temperatures dramatically, but also bring danger of lightning strikes and flash flooding in nearby slot canyons. Spring and Autumn - Variable weather. Days are often sunny and warm, nights clear and cool. Be prepared for abrupt changes, including strong winds, rain, hail and occasional snow. Winter - Colder temperatures and occasional snow. Temperatures are above freezing most days, but often drop into the teens and single digits at night. Reservations Safety Tips w Lightning danger is severe in exposed valley and park locations. Seek shelter in a building or vehicle during thunderstorms. w Drink plenty of water — one gallon per person per day in summer. w Goblin Valley is a remote, rugged area. Use caution while hiking. Reservations are available for group-use and individual campsites. Individual campsite reservations may be made two days to 16 weeks in advance of park departure date. Group-use reservations may be made up to 11 months in advance. To make a reservation, please call 801-3223770 within Salt Lake City or toll free 800-322-3770. Reservations are not required but advised. Unreserved sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis. User Fees Day-use and camping fees are charged. Additional fees are charged for group-use and reservations. Pets - Pets are allowed in Utah state parks, but must be on a maximum six-foot leash. Service animals are the only animals admitted in park buildings. For safety and courtesy, please keep your pets under control and clean up after them. Bicycles - Bicycling is permitted on established public roads and in parking areas. Bicycles are not allowed on hiking trails, in the valley of goblins or off paved areas within the campground. Off-highway vehicles - Off-highway vehicle riding is permitted in areas near the park. For designated areas contact a park ranger. Plants and animals - All plants, animals, minerals and other natural features in state parks are protected. It is unlawful to remove, alter or destroy them. Firearms - The discharge of weapons or firearms, including air and gas-powered types, and all other devices capable of launching a projectile which could immobilize, injure, or kill any person or animal or damage property are prohibited in the park system unless: The weapon or device is being used for the legal pursuit of wildlife; authorized by a Special Use Permit or an authorized event; used in accordance with the Concealed Wea
sTSTE PPIK a JuNT op RANGER PRoGRAM GOBLIN VALLEY STATE PARK JUNIOR RANGER PROGRAM Welcome to Goblin Valley State Park! Are you between the ages of six and 12? Do you want to learn more about Goblin Valley State Park? Do you want to become a Junior Ranger? To become a Junior Ranger complete at least six activities in this booklet. Once you've completed the activities, return to the visitor center with your booklet to receive an official Junior Ranger badge! Rangers and Naturalists take care of our state parks. In this booklet you will learn about some of the jobs they do. You will learn how YOU can help take care of Goblin Valley State-Park. Discovering Goblin Valley Some of the first people to discover Goblin Valley were cowboys searching for cattle. Imagine you were the first person to find Goblin Valley. How would you describe it? What would you name it? Discovery Walk As a Junior Ranger, it is important to explore the park so you can learn more about it. You will be able to share what you have found with other visitors. Explore with a parent and please leave everything as you find it for other visitors to enjoy. Find some of the things listed below: o Something soft o Something prickly o Something you smell o Something that moves o Something you can climb o Something an animal lives in o Something that is food for an animal You can list items, draw pictures, or write a story about what you see, hear, smell and feel during your discovery walk. A Story in the Rocks Geologists are people who study rocks. Rocks can tell geologists a story about what the landscape was like in the past. Goblin Valley's story goes something like this: Once upon a time, about 160 million years ago when dinosaurs walked the earth, Goblin Valley looked much different than it does today. There were mountains to the west, sand dunes to the east, and an inland sea nearby! Sand and clay washed down from the mountains to create layers of sediment here. With pressure from the layers above and lots of time, that sand and clay turned to rock. Geologists call it sedimentary rock! 1 00h1tAilhain Wean -.av. Can you think of something else that has layers? 2, (a,• 7 IT-r3) •3° .---) Sedimentary rock layers Q .31 u, • might remind you of this! CI Connect the dots to find out! .-p • . g *IT , t• .14 ....... ......<........::..... St : 94 i • .ta ; • • 9 14 15 6 • 5 • i'l ....""•..........„. .0 51 3• How did the Goblins form? Over time, cracks develop in the rock layers and rainwater seeps in. In cold weather the water freezes and expands causing the rock cracks to widen. This happens over and over again, pushing the rocks apart. Softer rocks in between the cracks wash away. Wind and rain round the rock edges causing the goblins to take shape! Draw a goblin that you saw today! Does it remind you of anything else? The Soil is Alive! Rangers and Naturalists help take care of all living things. In some areas of the park, even the soil is alive! Biological ("living") soil crust is very fragile. One footprint can damage years and years of growth! What does it look like? It is very hard to see when it's young but as it gets older, you'll see black bumps on the top of the soil. What is it? Tiny plants like algae, fungus, lichen and even bacteria, all help to form the soil crust. It can also be called Cryptobiotic Soil (crypto = hidden, biotic = life). What does it do? It holds sand together, holds water and provides nutrients to help plants grow. Where can I see it? Look for soil crust on the Curtis Bench Trail. bid you find it? If you did, draw a picture below of what it looks like to you! Remember, don't bust the crust! Desert Habitat All living things need: Water Food Shelter Space They find this in their HABITAT! Can you find these plants in their desert habitat? Rough Mulesears Rabbitbrush Joint Fir (Mormon Tea) Goblin Valley Crossword Write the answers to each question or picture in the boxes below. 2 ACROSS: 2 MEIN 5. This person learns about the park and helps park staff keep it clean and safe. 6 6 I I 10 I 10. Wind and water help form the goblins. I I DOWN: 1. Layers of sand and clay that has hardened over time is called rock. 3 9 11 12 4. This type of Cactus lives in Goblin Valley. 7. Animals that are most active at night are called Create a Goblin Valley Food Web! What is a food web? A food web is a way of connecting plants and animals in their habitat by showing who eats who! Some plants and small animals can be eaten by many different types of larger animals. Connect the plants and animals below with arrows. A mother kit fox has moved to another den and lost track of one of her pups. Can you help the kit fox pup find the new den and her family? F=sa k START Who Am I? Rangers and Naturalists teach visitors about the plants and animals that live in and around Goblin Valley. You can teach your friends and family about what you've learned. Use the clues below to solve these riddles:
Wasatch-Cashe N.F. Brigham City re at 43 Sa Weber lt La ke Davis 24 Salt Lake Tooele 25 ah 13 Wasatch Duchesne iv n Uintah ee Juab Gr 35 15 Ashley N.F. Uinta N.F. Nephi Price Manti-La Sal N.F. Carbon 44 Volunteers improve, protect, and preserve Utah State Parks. Individuals and couples may serve as camp hosts, greeters, educators, and interpreters. Families, service groups, and clubs are needed for fun and important projects. For volunteer opportunities call 801-538-7220 or email parksvolunteer@utah.gov. Delta 22 29 Fish Lake N.F. 27 Manti Gunnison 38 Millard Castle Dale 19 Grand Emery Green River 70 Richfield Sevier 14 Utah State Parks administers Utah’s boating program, including education, user compliance, accident investigation, and search and rescue. Utah law requires children under 13 years old to wear lifejackets when on a boat. Know the laws and navigation rules, and carry all required and suggested safety equipment. Sanpete Manti-La Sal N.F. Fillmore BOATING Arches N.P. 16 6 15 Beaver Beaver Fish Lake N.F.Junction 28 Capitol Reef N.P. Loa Wayne Hanksville Canyonlands N.P. Piute OFF-HIGHWAY VEHICLES Dixie N.F. Cedar Breaks N.M. Cedar City Bryce Canyon N.P. 36 Washington St. George do Ri er Manti-La Sal N.F. ra Co lo Monticello 10 Garfield 26 Boulder Natural Bridges N.R.A. Blanding Arches N.P. San Juan Glen Canyon N.R.A. 31 Zion N.P. Hurricane 34 17 Grand Staircase-Escalante N.M. Kane 5 La 20 11 Panguitch Parowan v 1 Dixie N.F. 15 Moab 30 Milford Iron Dinosaur N.M. 40 Uinta N.F. Utah Ut 37 Vernal Orem Provo 32 Wasatch-Cashe N.F. 7 Payson VOLUNTEERING ke Po w e l l Kanab UTAH STATE PARKS FIELD GUIDE STATEPARKS.UTAH.GOV CONTACT Utah State Parks and Recreation Administrative Office 1594 W. North Temple, Suite 116 P.O. Box 146001 Salt Lake City, Utah 84114-6001 801-538-7220 stateparks.utah.gov parkcomment@utah.gov FOR RESERVATIONS CALL: 801-322-3770 or toll-free 800-322-3770 OUR MISSION To enhance the quality of life by preserving and providing natural, cultural, and recreational resources for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations. YOUR PARK FEES PROVIDE FOR THE CARE, PROTECTION, AND ENHANCEMENT OF STATE PARKS. Photos: Utah State Parks and Recreation Information contained in this brochure was accurate at the time of printing. Policies, facilities, fees, hours and regulations, etc. change as mandated. For updated information, please contact the park or visit our website at stateparks.utah.gov. The Utah Department of Natural Resources receives federal aid and prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, age, national origin, or disability. For information or complaints regarding discrimination, contact: Executive Director, Utah Department of Natural Resources, P.O. Box 145610, Salt Lake City, UT 84114-5610 or Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, 1801 L Street, NW, Washington DC 20507-001. 03/19 Daggett Ashley N.F. Duchesne 42 41 Wasatch N.F. Utah State Parks is committed to accessibility in our programs, services, events, and facilities. For information about accessibility call 801-538-7220. Accessible campsites can be reserved online at utahstateparks.reserveamerica.com or by calling 1-800-322-3770. Stroll the boardwalks of Rock Cliff at Jordanelle, hike the trail of Sleeping Rainbows at Escalante Petrified Forest, and ride through lava flows at Snow Canyon. Explore state parks on foot, bike, or horseback. Always wear sturdy shoes and layered clothing, and carry water, sunscreen, and a first-aid kit. 33 Flaming Gorge N.R.A. Manila Summit Coalville Heber City 4 80 21 Salt Lake City Park City Lake Tooele 12 9 8 Morgan 39 80 ACCESSIBILITY TRAILS, HIKING, BIKING, AND HORSEBACK RIDING 84 Farmington 18 Wasatch-Cashe N.F. Morgan Ogden 2 Wendover The Heritage Program helps protect, preserve, research, and interpret our unique cultural and natural history resources for the enjoyment and education of all. We have Pony Express stops, dinosaur skeletons, and everything in between. Come travel back in time with us at our seven museums and many historical and paleontological areas. Rich er G To see what park passes are available and the qualifications for each pass, please visit stateparks.utah.gov/passes. Utah State Parks administers summer and winter off-highway vehicle (OHV) programs, including education, trail maintenance, grant programs, user compliance, accident investigations, and search and rescue. Always wear a helmet! (Helmets are required for riders 17 and under by Utah state law.) Operators ages 8–15 must possess an OHV education certificate. For more information, visit ohv.utah.gov. Utah State Parks Rainbow Bridge N.M. Hovenweep N.M. Bluff 41 42 43 44 UTAH STATE PARKS: SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE! Explore the history and beauty of Utah’s state parks. Venture back in time through discovery of

also available

National Parks
USFS NW