Snow Canyon

State Park - Utah

Snow Canyon State Park features a canyon carved from the red and white Navajo sandstone in the Red Mountains. The park is located near Ivins, Utah and St. George in Washington County. Other geological features of the state park include extinct cinder cones, lava tubes, lava flows, and sand dunes. Two canyons, West Canyon and Snow Canyon, begin side-by-side at the north gouging deeply into the sandstone of the Red Mountains, each canyon then running southward, slowly converging then finally meeting in the middle of the park. From there Snow Canyon continues south-by-southeastward as a single, larger canyon. Near the park's southern entrance, the canyon ends, its mouth opening out onto the Santa Clara bench near Ivins, Utah.

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Map of Red Mountain Wilderness in Utah. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Red Mountain - Wilderness Map

Map of Red Mountain Wilderness in Utah. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of Pine Valley Ranger District in Dixie National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Dixie MVTM - Pine Valley 2019

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of Pine Valley Ranger District in Dixie National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Pine Valley Ranger District in Dixie National Forest (NF) in Utah. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).,Dixie MVUM - Pine Valley 2021

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Pine Valley Ranger District in Dixie National Forest (NF) in Utah. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).,

Snow Canyon SP https://stateparks.utah.gov/parks/snow-canyon/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snow_Canyon_State_Park Snow Canyon State Park features a canyon carved from the red and white Navajo sandstone in the Red Mountains. The park is located near Ivins, Utah and St. George in Washington County. Other geological features of the state park include extinct cinder cones, lava tubes, lava flows, and sand dunes. Two canyons, West Canyon and Snow Canyon, begin side-by-side at the north gouging deeply into the sandstone of the Red Mountains, each canyon then running southward, slowly converging then finally meeting in the middle of the park. From there Snow Canyon continues south-by-southeastward as a single, larger canyon. Near the park's southern entrance, the canyon ends, its mouth opening out onto the Santa Clara bench near Ivins, Utah.
Snow Canyon State Park is a 7,400-acre scenic park tucked amid lava flows and soaring sandstone cliffs in a strikingly colorful and fragile desert environment. Visitors marvel at majestic views and the subtle interplay of light, shadow, and color dancing across canyon walls. Located in the 62,000-acre Red Cliffs Desert Reserve, established to protect the federallylisted desert tortoise and its habitat, the park offers opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts of all ages. Activities include hiking, nature studies, wildlife viewing, photography, camping, ranger talks and junior ranger programs. There are more than 38 miles of hiking trails, a three-mile paved walking/biking trail, technical climbing and more than 15 miles of equestrian trails. Park History Planning Your Visit Created in 1959, Snow Canyon has a long history of human use. Anasazi Indians inhabited the region from A.D. 200 to 1250, utilizing the canyon for hunting and gathering. Paiute Indians used the canyon from A.D. 1200 to the mid-1800s. Mormon pioneers discovered Snow Canyon in the 1850s while searching for lost cattle. The canyon was the site of Hollywood films such as Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, The Electric Horseman, and Jeremiah Johnson. Originally called Dixie State Park, it was later renamed for Lorenzo and Erastus Snow, prominent pioneering Utah leaders. Park facilities include picnic areas, modern restrooms, and a 33-unit campground with water and electric hook ups, tent and group campsites, showers, drinking water and sewage disposal station. Geology Transported by wind more than 183 million years ago, tiny grains of quartzite sand covered much of what is now Utah. These sand dunes, up to 2,500 feet thick, eventually cemented into stone. Burnt orange to creamy white in color, Navajo sandstone, the predominant rock in the park, is what remains of the ancient desert sand sea. Over time, water cut and shaped the sandstone to form canyons. Approximately 1.4 million years ago, and as recently as 27,000 years ago, nearby cinder cones erupted causing lava to flow down these canyons, filling them with basalt. This redirected ancient waterways, eventually carving new canyons. Look up to see lava-capped ridges that were once canyon bottoms. Park Guidelines Please observe these park regulations to ensure everyone’s visit is pleasant: Camping – Camp only in designated areas. Each permit covers one vehicle and any attached recreational equipment. There is an extra fee for additional vehicles or camping equipment. Only one extra vehicle and up to eight people are allowed in a campsite. Hiking – Hiking and scrambling are permitted only on designated trails and slickrock. See a park ranger for more information. Fires – Campfires may be built in designated areas. Gathering firewood or starter is prohibited. Seasonal fire bans are in effect June 1 through September 15. Pets – Permitted only in campground, on West Canyon Road, Whiptail Trail and Paradise Canyon; must be leashed. For safety and courtesy, please keep your pets under control. Your park fees provide for the care, protection and enhancement of this park. Park Location: The park is located eight miles north of St. George on State Route 18. Operating Hours: Plants and Animals Snow Canyon is home to a diversity of plant and wildlife species not found elsewhere in the state. Located at the intersection of the Mojave Desert, Great Basin Desert and Colorado Plateau, the park averages 7.5 inches of rainfall each year. Vegetation includes desert adapted species such as creosote bush, narrow leaf yucca, sand sage, blackbrush, scrub oak and desert willow. If spring and fall conditions are right, wildflowers light up the park with a showy display of blooms. Wildlife watchers may see coyotes, kit foxes, quail, roadrunners, leopard lizards, gopher snakes and canyon tree frogs. Fourteen sensitive species protected by state and/or federal law are found within the park. They include peregrine falcons, desert tortoises and gila monsters. Plant and wildlife checklists are available at park headquarters for a nominal fee. Removal of plants and wildlife is prohibited. ◆ Carry at least one liter of water per person. ◆ Do not hike alone. Take a friend or family member along or tell someone of your plans. ◆ Avoid hiking when temperatures are extreme. Otherwise keep your hike short, wear a hat and sunscreen, and bring water. ◆ Scrambling and rock climbing are dangerous and permitted in designated areas only. Each year inexperienced visitors are seriously injured or killed while climbing on rocks.Only attempt with proper equipment and training. Whoa! Slow Down! Snow Canyon State Park The park is open 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. year-round. No holiday closures. Address Inquiries To: Snow Canyon State Park 1002 Snow Canyon Dr. Ivins, UT 84738 (435) 628–2255 snowcanyon@utah.gov or Utah State Parks and Recreation P.O. Box 146001 Salt Lake City, UT 84114-6001 (801) 538-7220 stateparks.utah.gov Lots of peop
17 14 SHRUB LIVE OAK Quercus turbinella Found extensively throughout the park, shrub live oak forms low thickets. It has grayish green, prickly, holly-like leaves that remain year-round. Native cultures gathered its acorns for food and early settlers used the limbs and trunks for fence posts. Birds and mammals also eat the acorns and mule deer have been known to eat the leaves. The shrub provides shelter for birds and mammals. UTAH YUCCA Yucca utahensis Yucca was possibly the single most important non-cultivated plant to native peoples of the southwest. Buds, young flowers and tender growing stalks were eaten both raw and cooked, while leaves were chewed. Roots were used to make soap and cleaned fibers from yucca leaves were twisted into cord and small ropes to make sandals and mats. The dried stalks were used in making cradle boards. Female carpenter bees will tunnel into the dried flower stalks to lay their eggs. Do you see any small, circular holes in the dead stalks? Can you find any acorns or acorn caps in its branches? Without leaving the trail, look towards the red rocks behind the signpost. Can you see an arch? 15 18 BLACKBRUSH Coleogyne ramosissima Blackbrush gets its name from the older stems, which have a rough black bark. A characteristic of blackbrush is its pattern of intricate branches. Each successive pair of branchlets tends to be at right angles to the stems from which they arise. Smaller branchlets end in spines. Desert bighorn sheep and deer browse the plant despite its spiny nature. The fruits and seeds are eaten by small rodents and birds, such as ground squirrels and quail. 16 DESERT VARNISH At first glance, this blackish-maroon coating—in the distance—appears to be painted on the sandstone. It is actually an accumulation of minerals, iron and manganese, that are deposited as rain or groundwater move through the stone. Bacteria on the rock surface aid in the formation of these dark layers which can be very thin or several layers thick. The more manganese found in the mineral layer, the darker the varnish; the more iron, the redder the color. Desert varnish does not erode as quickly as the sandstone it covers. Do you notice any difference in appearance between the red sandstone that is covered with varnish as opposed to that without the varnish? CREOSOTE BUSH Larrea tridentata Researchers have dated stands of creosote in California and Arizona at between 11,000 and 12,000 years old. Creosote stands predate giant redwoods and bristlecone pines as one of the oldest living plants. Native cultures used creosote for a variety of medicines. Resins deposited on its stems by beetles were used to cement arrowheads to shafts, waterproof basketry and mend pottery. Small rodents, birds and reptiles use the plant for shelter. Though the leaves are unpalatable to wildlife, there are 22 species of bees that depend on the creosote’s yellow flowers for pollen and nectar. Creosote bush is found throughout the Mojave Desert. As you hike in Snow Canyon, look for creosote bushes to determine how far the Mojave habitat extends up the canyon. 19 PINYON PINE Pinus monophylla Your park fees provide for the care, protection and enhancement of this park. Address inquiries to: Snow Canyon State Park 1002 Snow Canyon Drive Ivins, Utah 84738-6194 (435) 628-2255 (800) 322-3770 Reservations Snow Canyon State Park Hidden Pinyon Trail Guide Utah State Parks and Recreation PO Box 146001 Salt Lake City, Utah 84114-6001 (801) 538-7220 stateparks.utah.gov Thank you for returning this brochure, if no longer needed, to the trail guide box. Illustrations by Zackery Zdinak Utah State Parks Mission To enhance the quality of life by preserving and providing natural, cultural and recreational resources for the enjoyment, education and inspiration of this and future generations. This tree is often found in mixed stands with Utah Juniper. Mature trees average 20 feet in height and 18 inches in diameter. Leaves are needle-like, one to two inches long. The seeds are an important food source for songbirds, quail, squirrels and mule deer. Native cultures also relied on the pinyon seeds for food and were either eaten raw or roasted and ground into a flour. The seeds are still an important crop today. Can you find the Hidden Pinyon for which this trail is named? Utah State Parks WELCOME TO THE HIDDEN PINYON NATURE TRAIL. 6 Plan on approximately one hour to complete this 1.5-mile round-trip hike. As you walk along the trail, follow the numbered posts listed in this guide. Please stay on the trail to prevent damage to trailside plants and animal burrows. All plants, animals, rocks and other natural features in the park are protected, and it is unlawful to remove, alter or destroy them. Begin at the first numbered marker to the right of the trail guide box. 1 MORMON TEA Ephedra viridis These stick or broom-like shrubs grow between one and four feet tall. Although the plant appears leafless, scale-like leaves
V OLUME 15, I SSUE 3 Winter Calendar of Events D E C EM B ER 5 , 2 0 1 8 Sunset Hike Explore the twilight sights and sounds of the canyon during a onemile, round trip hike. Fri., 12/7, 4:30-6:00 pm West Canyon Discovery Hike Join us on this two-mile, round trip walk with a ranger and talk about the discoveries we find along the way—you can even bring your canine pal! Sat., 12/8, 9:00-10:30 am Sat., 1/5, 9:00-10:30 am Lava Tube Hike Join park staff for a twomile, round trip hike and the chance to explore the unique formations of a lava tube! Sat, 12/22, 1:00-2:30 pm Star Walk: North Star Join us for a stroll under the stars and learn more about our north star and its neighboring constellations. Fri., 1/4, 6:30-8:00 pm Did You Know? Moonlit Hike Join park staff for a - Spotted Towhees can moonlit, two-mile round often be heard in the trip hike. Enjoy the underbrush as they opportunity to see the make a two-footed, canyon by moon-glow. backwards-scratching hop. This "doubleFri., 1/18, 6:00-7:30 pm scratching" is used by Sat, 1/19, 6:30-8:00 pm a number of towhee and sparrow species Star Walk: to uncover the seeds Winter Circle and small inverteJoin us for a stroll under brates they feed on. the stars and explore the - Spotted Towhees live ‘Winter Circle’—a bright in drier habitats than pattern of stars adorning Eastern Towhees. our chilly skies! Some scientists have Fri., 2/1, 7:00-8:30 pm suggested that the bold white spots on Kite Critters: Spotted Towhees’ Great Horned Owl backs help them Decorate and craft your blend in to the sunown kite while learning dappled undergrowth. about Great Horned Owls. Designed for ages 10 and older, adults welcome. Sat., 2/2, 10:00-Noon All listed events are free and open to the public. Space is limited; registration required. Program registration is held two days preceding the scheduled event. Register by phone or in person. For more information or to register for a program contact park staff at (435) 628-2255. Moonlit Hike Join park staff for a moonlit, two-mile round trip hike. Enjoy the opportunity to see the canyon by moon-glow. Fri., 2/15, 6:30-8:00 pm Sat., 2/16, 6:30-8:00 pm —Spotted Towhee, photograph by Rick Fridell Snow Canyon State Park Winter Magic in Snow Canyon Snow Canyon State Park 1002 Snow Canyon Drive Ivins, UT 84738 Phone: (435) 628-2255 Fax: (435) 628-9321 Email: snowcanyon@utah.gov Web: www.stateparks.utah.gov Utah State Parks: Providing opportunities to enhance the quality of life by preserving natural, cultural, and recreational resources for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations. Yellowed leaves rattle in the canyon’s cottonwoods, soon to hitch a ride with the wind. Days are shorter, temperatures cooler, and with Thanksgiving behind us, most regular park visitors observe the distinct calm that seems to have settled over the canyon. It is not uncommon now to find parking lots almost vacant. Trails seem to belong solely to the occasional hiker. Where did the collective hum of the fall crowds go? Entering the winter season can offer a dramatically different park experience for canyon visitors. Although wildlife may be sparse, grasses dried, the landscape subdued, and temperatures nippy, you might be surprised to learn this is actually a favorite season for many. To discover the magic that only this season in the canyon can offer, and to make the most out of your next winter excursion in the park, you may find the following helpful. No crowds means more opportunities: There are many birds that don’t migrate, but instead reside in the canyon year-long. For instance, listen for sounds of the Spotted Towhee who can be heard scratching and hopping underneath dense tangles of brush. So, pick up a bird list and learn more about what species you might keep an eye (or ear) out for while out on the trails. Photography is popular, especially if you prefer your landscapes ‘people-less’! There is a surreal feel to the canyon that many capture this time of year, so bring your camera and get inspired! Find serenity and take time to reflect. Getting lost with your thoughts in this amazing landscape, without the chatter of others, can be very rewarding. Pause and enjoy the natural sounds of the canyon. Even though it is winter, many plants and wildflowers are already setting the stage for spring. Grab a plant guide and learn which plants are taking advantage of this growing season. Short days leave more opportunity for viewing the night sky. Get a star guide and learn a new constellation or two. You can still be home and in bed by 9 p.m.! Remember to take plenty of water on your adventures and adapt your hiking attire/gear for the season. Be mindful of how long you expect to be out on the trails—especially with the early sunsets—and always let someone know of your plans and expected return. “The comfort of reclusion, the poetry of hibernation.” ~ Marcel Proust, Swann’s Way Before long, the temperatures will begin to warm
Wasatch-Cashe N.F. Brigham City re at 43 Sa Weber lt La ke Davis 24 Salt Lake Tooele 25 ah 13 Wasatch Duchesne iv n Uintah ee Juab Gr 35 15 Ashley N.F. Uinta N.F. Nephi Price Manti-La Sal N.F. Carbon 44 Volunteers improve, protect, and preserve Utah State Parks. Individuals and couples may serve as camp hosts, greeters, educators, and interpreters. Families, service groups, and clubs are needed for fun and important projects. For volunteer opportunities call 801-538-7220 or email parksvolunteer@utah.gov. Delta 22 29 Fish Lake N.F. 27 Manti Gunnison 38 Millard Castle Dale 19 Grand Emery Green River 70 Richfield Sevier 14 Utah State Parks administers Utah’s boating program, including education, user compliance, accident investigation, and search and rescue. Utah law requires children under 13 years old to wear lifejackets when on a boat. Know the laws and navigation rules, and carry all required and suggested safety equipment. Sanpete Manti-La Sal N.F. Fillmore BOATING Arches N.P. 16 6 15 Beaver Beaver Fish Lake N.F.Junction 28 Capitol Reef N.P. Loa Wayne Hanksville Canyonlands N.P. Piute OFF-HIGHWAY VEHICLES Dixie N.F. Cedar Breaks N.M. Cedar City Bryce Canyon N.P. 36 Washington St. George do Ri er Manti-La Sal N.F. ra Co lo Monticello 10 Garfield 26 Boulder Natural Bridges N.R.A. Blanding Arches N.P. San Juan Glen Canyon N.R.A. 31 Zion N.P. Hurricane 34 17 Grand Staircase-Escalante N.M. Kane 5 La 20 11 Panguitch Parowan v 1 Dixie N.F. 15 Moab 30 Milford Iron Dinosaur N.M. 40 Uinta N.F. Utah Ut 37 Vernal Orem Provo 32 Wasatch-Cashe N.F. 7 Payson VOLUNTEERING ke Po w e l l Kanab UTAH STATE PARKS FIELD GUIDE STATEPARKS.UTAH.GOV CONTACT Utah State Parks and Recreation Administrative Office 1594 W. North Temple, Suite 116 P.O. Box 146001 Salt Lake City, Utah 84114-6001 801-538-7220 stateparks.utah.gov parkcomment@utah.gov FOR RESERVATIONS CALL: 801-322-3770 or toll-free 800-322-3770 OUR MISSION To enhance the quality of life by preserving and providing natural, cultural, and recreational resources for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations. YOUR PARK FEES PROVIDE FOR THE CARE, PROTECTION, AND ENHANCEMENT OF STATE PARKS. Photos: Utah State Parks and Recreation Information contained in this brochure was accurate at the time of printing. Policies, facilities, fees, hours and regulations, etc. change as mandated. For updated information, please contact the park or visit our website at stateparks.utah.gov. The Utah Department of Natural Resources receives federal aid and prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, age, national origin, or disability. For information or complaints regarding discrimination, contact: Executive Director, Utah Department of Natural Resources, P.O. Box 145610, Salt Lake City, UT 84114-5610 or Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, 1801 L Street, NW, Washington DC 20507-001. 03/19 Daggett Ashley N.F. Duchesne 42 41 Wasatch N.F. Utah State Parks is committed to accessibility in our programs, services, events, and facilities. For information about accessibility call 801-538-7220. Accessible campsites can be reserved online at utahstateparks.reserveamerica.com or by calling 1-800-322-3770. Stroll the boardwalks of Rock Cliff at Jordanelle, hike the trail of Sleeping Rainbows at Escalante Petrified Forest, and ride through lava flows at Snow Canyon. Explore state parks on foot, bike, or horseback. Always wear sturdy shoes and layered clothing, and carry water, sunscreen, and a first-aid kit. 33 Flaming Gorge N.R.A. Manila Summit Coalville Heber City 4 80 21 Salt Lake City Park City Lake Tooele 12 9 8 Morgan 39 80 ACCESSIBILITY TRAILS, HIKING, BIKING, AND HORSEBACK RIDING 84 Farmington 18 Wasatch-Cashe N.F. Morgan Ogden 2 Wendover The Heritage Program helps protect, preserve, research, and interpret our unique cultural and natural history resources for the enjoyment and education of all. We have Pony Express stops, dinosaur skeletons, and everything in between. Come travel back in time with us at our seven museums and many historical and paleontological areas. Rich er G To see what park passes are available and the qualifications for each pass, please visit stateparks.utah.gov/passes. Utah State Parks administers summer and winter off-highway vehicle (OHV) programs, including education, trail maintenance, grant programs, user compliance, accident investigations, and search and rescue. Always wear a helmet! (Helmets are required for riders 17 and under by Utah state law.) Operators ages 8–15 must possess an OHV education certificate. For more information, visit ohv.utah.gov. Utah State Parks Rainbow Bridge N.M. Hovenweep N.M. Bluff 41 42 43 44 UTAH STATE PARKS: SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE! Explore the history and beauty of Utah’s state parks. Venture back in time through discovery of

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