Dixie NF - Cedar City

National Forest - Utah

Dixie National Forest is a United States National Forest in Utah with headquarters in Cedar City. It occupies almost two million acres (8,000 km²) and stretches for about 170 miles (270 km) across southern Utah. The largest national forest in Utah, it straddles the divide between the Great Basin and the Colorado River. The Cedar City Ranger District is located on the Markagunt Plateau, a gently sloping, eastward tilted earth block that has been modified by erosion, volcanism, and some glaciations. Bordered by the beautiful pink limestone of the Wasatch formation (the same formation that forms the spires and landscape of Bryce Canyon National Park and Cedar Breaks National Monument), the District has some of the more spectacular scenery in the west.

maps

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of Cedar City Valley Ranger District in Dixie National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Dixie MVTM - Cedar City 2019

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of Cedar City Valley Ranger District in Dixie National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Cedar City Ranger District in Dixie National Forest (NF) in Utah. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).,Dixie MVUM - Cedar City 2021

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Cedar City Ranger District in Dixie National Forest (NF) in Utah. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).,

Map of popular Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) trails on the Markagunt Plateau and the Dixie National Forest in Utah. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Markagunt - OHV Trails

Map of popular Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) trails on the Markagunt Plateau and the Dixie National Forest in Utah. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Dixie NF - Cedar City https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/dixie/recarea/?recid=24840 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dixie_National_Forest Dixie National Forest is a United States National Forest in Utah with headquarters in Cedar City. It occupies almost two million acres (8,000 km²) and stretches for about 170 miles (270 km) across southern Utah. The largest national forest in Utah, it straddles the divide between the Great Basin and the Colorado River. The Cedar City Ranger District is located on the Markagunt Plateau, a gently sloping, eastward tilted earth block that has been modified by erosion, volcanism, and some glaciations. Bordered by the beautiful pink limestone of the Wasatch formation (the same formation that forms the spires and landscape of Bryce Canyon National Park and Cedar Breaks National Monument), the District has some of the more spectacular scenery in the west.
i x i e Nat i on a l For e s t VISITOR GUIDE A Contrast in Color, Climate, & Culture Pine Valley Reser voir yon Red Can A place of diversity, the Dixie National Forest straddles the divide between the Great Basin and the Colorado River in southern Utah. Scenery ranges from desert canyon gorges of amber, rose, and sienna to high mountain forests, plateaus, and alpine lakes. Fast Forest Facts Elevation Range: 3,000’–11,000’ Acres: Nearly 2 million The Name: Southwest Utah was called Utah’s Dixie by early settlers from the southern states sent to the desert to grow cotton and silk; the forest was named after the area. Temperature Range: From mountain lows of -30 degrees to valley highs of over 100 degrees Fahrenheit. T What’s Inside History .................................. 2 Scenic Byways, Backways, & Drives ............. 3 Special Places ..................... 4 Our Natural Resources ........ 6 Map ....................................... 8 Campgrounds & Guard Station Rentals ....... 10 Trails .................................... 11 Activities .............................. 12 Know Before You Go............ 14 Contact Information ............ 16 he Dixie National Forest is characterized by contrast. As a part of the world-renowned landscapes of Southern Utah, the forest provides a backdrop and serves as a gateway to surrounding National Parks and Monuments. Nationally recognized highways and trails course through the forest and provide ready access to the distinctive natural highlights of the forest landscape. Come see for yourself! Sego Lily This Visitor Guide provides the information you can use to plan your trip to the Dixie National Forest. G et to Know Us inhabited by the Paleo-Indian Culture who hunted woolly mammoths and megafauna. This culture was followed by another hunter-gatherer group known as the Archaic Culture. They also lived seasonally in the high country and followed game to lower elevations in winter. B.C. ca 2,000 ir c , h p a Pictogr ictographs, petroglyphs, P dwellings, and artifacts—all indicate the presence in the area of horticultural cultures. Identified as the Fremont and Anasazi (Ancestral Puebloean), they occupied the Dixie National Forest area from 5001275 AD. They were farmers, planting corn, beans, and squash near water sources. North Creek granary These cultures used the high country for hunting and gathering of rock, medicinal plants, and other resources. Their stone granaries—still visible tucked into the sandstone cliffs—kept their stores safe from animals. By the early 1300s, groups Ute family, circa 1860-1 88 (courtesy of firstpeople.c 0 om) known as the Paiutes and Utes moved here from the west, living much the same as their predecessors. These were the people who were here when the first Europeans explored the area. In 1776, led by Fathers Dominquez and Escalante, a new route was pioneered known as the Old Spanish Trail. By the mid 1800s trappers, traders, gold hunters, slave traders, and immigrants traveled this road regularly. Today it parallels much of Interstate 15. orested lands in F Southern Utah are vital to the surrounding communities. This point was not lost on President Theodore Roosevelt who reserved 20 million acres of the forest during his first term in office and 80 million during his second. While the forest reserves were originally set aside to provide favorable conditions for water flow to the valleys and a continuous supply of timber, additional lands were added to the reserves in response to concerns The conservation mission of the from local communities Forest Service was best stated by about overgrazing and its first Chief, Gifford Pinchot (1905water quality. In the 1930s, 1910): “To provide the greatest good for the greatest number of people for three different reserves the long run.” were combined to form the Dixie National Forest. uring the D Great Depression of the 1930s, the national forest served as a work area for the Civilian CCC building a restroom on Brian Head Conservation Peak, circa 1935 Corps (CCC), providing young men with jobs building roads, guard stations, and recreation sites. There are still several facilities on the forest that show off the craftmanship of “The Boys.” oday, people value the Dixie National Forest not only T for its resources (minerals, timber, water, and forage) but also for its opportunities for camping, fishing, hiking, and wildlife viewing. The Dixie National Forest is located in the “Grand Circle” with several famous neighbors, including Zion, Bryce Canyon, and Capitol Reef National Parks, and Cedar Breaks and the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments. The dramatic elevation differences mean you can pick the weather you want to recreate in! Virgin River Rim 2 The vast resources of the Dixie National Forest belong to all Americans. These resources must rely on the stewardship of us all if they are to be sustained for our future generations. Gifford Pinchot What is now th
Getting There Bristlecone Pine Trail Access The Bristlecone Pine Trail is a short, 0.5 mile roundtrip, hiking trail that is named after the trees that grow along the trail. The Bristlecone Pine tree is considered the oldest living single organism in the world. Some of the trees date back nearly 4,500 years, around the same time the pyramids were being built in Egypt! Bristlecone Pine Trail is accessed from the Bristlecone Pine Trailhead/Parking Area. Bristlecone Pine Trailhead N 37° 34.047’ W 112° 50.933’ From Cedar City to Bristlecone Pine: Approximately 18 miles The key to these trees surviving to their remarkable age is their ability to survive in adverse growing conditions. Bristlecone Pine trees have the amazing ability to grow during favorable years and almost completely stop all growth during adverse years. Their slow growth makes their wood extremely dense which makes it resistant to insects, rot, and erosion. Many of them contain considerable amounts of dead wood that surround a thin lining of inner bark that sustains the living portion of the tree. From I-15 take Exit 59 for UT-56/200 North. Proceed east on 200 North for 1 mile to the intersection with Main Street. Turn right onto Main Street and head south for 0.2 miles to the intersection with Center Street/University Blvd/UT-14. Turn left onto Center Street/UT-14 and continue southeast on UT-14 for 17 miles to the Bristlecone Pine Trailhead parking area on the south side of the road. 15 143 Brian Head Cedar City Cedar Breaks N.M. 14 143 143 Branches and Needles Trailhead 1 2 3 4 5 Miles Viewing Platform Dixie National Forest Found on the high, barren, wind-swept slopes of the southwestern states, Bristlecone Pine trees can be identified by their location, form, foliage, and cones. These trees are short, bushy, often multi-stemmed and malformed. The needles are deep green and occur in clusters of five. They are 1” to 1 ½” in length and slightly curved. The needles completely surround the twigs and small branches giving them the appearance of a long bushy tail. The cones are 3” to 3 ½” in length and are a deep chocolate brown at maturity. The cone scales are stout, thick, and armed with a long fragile prickle from which the Bristlecone Pine receives its common name. The trail is accessible late spring when the snowpack has melted through the fall. There is a little shade offered along the trail under the trees but many areas are fully exposed to the sun. There is also no water available along the trail. While the elevation helps to keep things moderately cool, prepare for warm temperatures during the summer. Due to the limited range, unique age, scientific and aesthetic value, the U.S. Forest Service has a non-cutting, non-removal policy for the trees. You are encouraged to visit and photograph these extraordinary specimens but please do not climb, carve, or deface the trees. We hope you enjoy your visit to the Dixie National Forest. Please remember to respect your National Forest Lands and Tread Lightly! Trailhead Cedar City Ranger District The trail is a relatively flat easy hike, but be careful on some of the uneven surfaces. The trail offers two branches, diverging shortly out of the parking area and converging before the viewing platform at the end. To see all the trail has to offer take one branch on the way out and the other on the way back. The viewing platform at the end of the trail offers spectacular views of the upper reaches of Zion National Park. 148 0 Bristlecone Pine Trail Bristlecone August 2011 Named for the spectacular Bristlecone Pine trees that grow in the area, this short, 0.5 mile roundtrip, hiking trail is a journey back in time. The end of the trail provides beautiful views into Zion National Park. Forest Service United States Department of Agriculture Cedar Breaks National Monument s ing Po Crystal Tra il ta to ow ll Ho Ashdown Gorge Wilderness Area n 14 w Parking Area il 51 il Tra #361 #277 Blowhard Tra i ne o ec tl is Br l 14 e s #2 Spr ne Pi a Tr #1 5 62 Viewing Platform 0 250 500 750 Ha 24 #16 1,000 Feet 51 #2 k oc nc 148 #052 9,980 #251 51 9,960 l i Tra 9,940 9,920 9,900 #240 0 0.05 0.1 Rim 0.5 0.75 1 Viewing Platform 9,960 #055 9,940 #0 9,920 55 #0 55 0 Elevation in Feet 0.25 9,980 9,900 Mile 0.2 0 0.05 0.1 0.15 Distance in Miles 0.2 65 0.25 l 0 #1635 0.15 Distance in Miles Bristlecone Pine Trail Profile - East Path Parking Area 10,000 i Tra Bristlecone Pine Trail Viewing Platform #2 er Riv Elevation in Feet 10,000 14 #162 6 Bristlecone Pine Trail Profile - West Path Parking Area #1 in Peak Vir g 0.25
Cascade Falls Trail Getting There Access Cascade Falls Trail is a short, 1.1 mile roundtrip, hiking trail that is named for the waterfall that pours out of the cliff at the end of the trail. The water that flows over the falls originates in Navajo Lake and drains through a series of sinks hole in the east end of the lake. The water travels well over a mile through underground lava tubes before reappearing at the falls. The water then continues on the form the north fork of the Virgin River. Please note that the lava tube is closed to exploration due to high water flows and low oxygen levels. Cascade Falls Trail is accessed from the Cascade Falls Trailhead/Parking Area. Cascade Falls Trailhead N 37° 29.837’ W 112° 45.096’ From Cedar City to Cascade Falls: Approximately 29.5 miles From I-15 take Exit 59 for UT-56/200 North. Proceed east on 200 North for 1 mile to the intersection with Main Street. Turn right onto Main Street and head south for 0.2 miles to the intersection with Center Street/University Blvd/UT-14. Turn left onto Center Street/UT-14 and continue southeast on UT-14 for 25.3 miles to the junction with Navajo Lake Road/Forest Road #053. Turn right onto Navajo Lake Road/Forest Road #053 and continue 0.3 miles to the sign pointing to Cascade Falls. Turn left onto Forest Road #054 and continue 1.1 miles. Turn right to stay on Forest Road #054 and continue another 1.6 miles to the Cascade Falls parking area. Viewing Platform Parowan 15 The trail is an "out and back" type trail that is approximately 0.6 miles each way. There are benches along the trail allowing the hiker to rest and enjoy the scenery, as well as a viewing platforms located halfway along the trail and at the terminus. The trail is mostly flat with a few moderate inclines. There are numerous stairs throughout the trail that require reasonable mobility. Cascade Falls is a relatively "kid friendly" trail although there are a few steep drop-offs that may require some hand holding. The trail is well maintained and experiences little elevation change making it great for novice hikers yet offers enough stunning views to make it enjoyable for even the most experienced hikers. Don’t forget your camera! Cascade Falls Trail Cedar City Ranger District Dixie National Forest Restroom facilities and a large parking area are provided at the trailhead. The trailhead also serves as an intermediate trailhead for the Virgin River Rim Trail. The trail to the north heads nine miles to Te-ah campground at Navajo Lake, and the trail to the south heads 11 miles to Strawberry Point. While the Virgin River Rim Trail is open to hiking, mountain biking, and horseback riding, the Cascade Falls Trail is open to foot traffic only. 143 Brian Head Cedar City 143 14 148 The trail is accessible late spring through the fall when the snowpack has melted. There is very little shade offered along the trail and it is completely exposed to the sun during afternoon hours. There is also no water available along the trail. While the elevation helps to keep things moderately cool, prepare for warm temperatures during the summer. 14 Cascade Falls 0 1 2 3 4 5 Miles Stairs Ascending the Trail The Cascade Falls Trail has been designated a National Recreation Trail for its outstanding scenic values. Extensive restoration that occurred in 2010 will help ensure that this popular route will remain accessible to Dixie National Forest visitors for years to come. We hope that you enjoy your visit to the Dixie National Forest. Please remember to respect your National Forest Lands and Tread Lightly! Named for the Waterfall that Flows Out of the Side of the Cliff, this 1.1 Mile Roundtrip Hiking Trail is a Local Favorite. The Trail Also Provides Spectacular Views of Zion National Park and the Pink Cliffs. Forest Viewing Platform at the Falls View of the Trail From the Falls October 2010 Service United States Department of Agriculture Nav ajo Lake l Trai 14 r Tra il Navajo Lake unte Cascade Falls Trail H Lost Loop 4 #05 #053 Trail in Ri ke 9 Di ve r Rim #0 54 w Co ke La Trail Cascade Falls Elevation in Feet Cascade Falls Trailhead 0 Duck Creek Visitor Center #0 5 Vir g #370 0.25 0.5 0.75 1 Mile Cascade Falls Trail Profile REST AREA & VIEWING PLATFORM Distance in Miles Cascade Falls Viewing Platform REST AREA BENCH
From Cedar City to Te-ah: Approximately 32 miles Getting There Access The Virgin River Rim Trail can be accessed from several points depending on how far, and which direction you wish to travel. From Strawberry Point From Cascade Falls From Te-ah (Navajo Lake) From Woods Ranch N 37° 26.177’ N 37° 29.837’ N 37° 32.020’ N 37° 35.643’ W 112° 42.684’ W 112° 45.096’ W 112° 49.300’ W 112° 54.980’ Shuttle You may want to leave a shuttle vehicle at any of the trail access points if you only wish to hike one direction. From Cedar City to Strawberry Point: Approximately 42.5 miles From I-15 take Exit 59 for UT-56/200 North. Proceed east on 200 North for 1 mile to the intersection with Main Street. Turn right onto Main Street and head south for 0.2 miles to the intersection with Center Street/University Blvd/UT-14. Turn left onto Center Street/UT-14 and continue southeast on UT-14 for 32.6 miles to the junction with Strawberry Point Road. Turn right onto Strawberry Point Road and continue 8.6 miles, where you will see the trailhead on your left. Continue on another 0.2 miles to the parking area at Strawberry Point. The parking area at Strawberry Point is larger and can accommodate more vehicles than the small pullout at the trailhead. From I-15 take Exit 59 for UT-56/200 North. Proceed east on 200 North for 1 mile to the intersection with Main Street. Turn right onto Main Street and head south for 0.2 miles to the intersection with Center Street/University Blvd/UT-14. Turn left onto Center Street/UT-14 and continue southeast on UT-14 for 25.3 miles to the junction with Navajo Lake Road/Forest Road #053. Turn right onto Navajo Lake Road and continue 5.7 miles. After you pass Te-Ah campground but before you take the sweeping left turn to the south you will see a pull out and a trailhead sign. Park here, the trail straight ahead is coming from Woods Ranch behind you down the road approximately 200 feet is the trail coming from Cascade Falls. From Cedar City to Woods Ranch: Approximately 13 miles From I-15 take Exit 59 for UT-56/200 North. Proceed east on 200 North for 1 mile to the intersection with Main Street. Turn right onto Main Street and head south for 0.2 miles to the intersection with Center Street/University Blvd/UT-14. Turn left onto Center Street/UT-14 and continue southeast on UT-14 for 11.5 miles. Woods Ranch is on your right. The trailhead is the road to the north of the large pavilion and swing set. You can park near the pavilion or there is more parking further south in the loop. From Cedar City to Cascade Falls: Approximately 29.5 miles From I-15 take Exit 59 for UT-56/200 North. Proceed east on 200 North for 1 mile to the intersection with Main Street. Turn right onto Main Street and head south for 0.2 miles to the intersection with Center Street/University Blvd/UT-14. Turn left onto Center Street/UT-14 and continue southeast on UT-14 for 25.3 miles to the junction with Navajo Lake Road/Forest Road #053. Turn right onto Navajo Lake Road/Forest Road #053 and continue 0.3 miles to the sign pointing to Cascade Falls. Turn left onto Forest Road #054 and continue 1.1 miles. Turn right to stay on Forest Road #054 and continue another 1.6 miles to the Cascade Falls parking Area. The trail to your east is coming from Strawberry Point and the trail to your west is from Te-ah. The Virgin River Rim Trail The Virgin River Rim Trail winds through 32 miles of some of the most spectacular scenery southern Utah has to offer. From stunning pink cliffs, to verdant high altitude forests, the trail offers a little something for everyone. The trail is long and can be quite rigorous at points so most people choose to only enjoy a portion at a time. The following suggestions are provided to help you find the adventure you are looking for during your visit to the Dixie National Forest. Strawberry Point to Cascade Falls Approximately 11 miles This section of trail offers amazing views off of the "top step" of the Grand-Staircase to the "lower steps" of Zion National Park. There are numerous places along this section to stop and enjoy the view. Eroded from limestone, the iron in the rock rusts, creating spectacular colors along the side of the rim. Cedar City Ranger District Dixie National Forest Cascade Falls to Te-ah Approximately 9 miles This section of trail is packed with views of the headwaters of the Virgin River and Zion National Park. If you have the time you may also enjoy the short half mile hike down to Cascade Falls. As Navajo Lake slowly drains through the lava rock below it exits at Cascade Falls. There are also several access points from this portion of the trail down to Navajo Lake. Utilizing the Dike, Spruces, Navajo, or Lodge trails you can tie into the Navajo Lake Loop trail. This trail offers a beautiful nine mile ride around Navajo Lake. Te-ah to Woods Ranch Approximately 12 miles Strawberry Parowan 15 143 Point This section of trail winds through thick forests of Douglas fir and A

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