Beacon Rock

State Park - Washington

Beacon Rock State Park is a geologic preserve and public recreation area on Route 14 in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area in Skamania County, Washington. The park takes its name from Beacon Rock, an 848-foot (258 m) basalt volcanic plug on the north shore of the Columbia River 32 miles (51 km) east of Vancouver. On October 31, 1805, the Lewis and Clark Expedition arrived here and first measured tides on the river, indicating that they were nearing the ocean.

maps

Recreation map of the Western Area of Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Columbia River Gorge - Recreation Map West

Recreation map of the Western Area of Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Visitor map of Gifford Pinchot National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Gifford Pinchot - Visitor Map

Visitor map of Gifford Pinchot National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Recreation map of Mount Adams Wilderness, Indian Heaven Wilderness, Trapper Creek Wilderness in Gifford Pinchot National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Mount Adams Wilderness, Indian Heaven Wilderness, Trapper Creek Wilderness - Recreation Map

Recreation map of Mount Adams Wilderness, Indian Heaven Wilderness, Trapper Creek Wilderness in Gifford Pinchot National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Map of Washington State Highways / Tourist Map. Published by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT).Washington State - Highway Map

Map of Washington State Highways / Tourist Map. Published by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT).

Beacon Rock SP https://parks.state.wa.us/474/Beacon-Rock https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beacon_Rock_State_Park Beacon Rock State Park is a geologic preserve and public recreation area on Route 14 in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area in Skamania County, Washington. The park takes its name from Beacon Rock, an 848-foot (258 m) basalt volcanic plug on the north shore of the Columbia River 32 miles (51 km) east of Vancouver. On October 31, 1805, the Lewis and Clark Expedition arrived here and first measured tides on the river, indicating that they were nearing the ocean.
Beacon Rock State Park 34841 State Route 14 Skamania, WA 98648 (509) 427-8265 Things to remember Beacon Rock • SummerState hours – AprilPark 1 to is located in theSept. heart of the 30, 6:30 a.m.Columbia to dusk • Winter schedule Oct. 1 to River Gorge National Scenic –Area March 31, 8 a.m. to dusk. Alwith historic significance dating back though most parks are open hundreds of years. Beacon Rock is year round, some parks or the core of an ancient The portions ofvolcano. parks are closed mile-long trail toduring its summit provides the winter. For a winoutstanding panoramic of the ter scheduleviews and information seasonal closures, Columbia Riverabout Gorge. visit www.parks.wa.gov Visitors may explore more thanor20 call the information center at miles of hiking trails, including a one(360) 902-8844. mile interpretive• Wildlife, trail atplants the and Doetsch all park day-use area. The trail is accessible buildings, signs, tables and to people with disabilities. other structures are protectremoval or damage The 5,100-acreed;camping park of any kind is prohibited. Huntalso offers a variety of recreational ing, feeding of wildlife and activities that include boating, rock gathering firewood on state climbing, horseback ridingis and fishing. park property prohibited. Additionally, there are interpretive • One camping party is al- signs about the Ice Age floods theof lowed per site.along Maximum eight people per campsite. Beacon Rock Trail. • Campsites may not be held for other parties. The Discover Pass is• required day visits toisstate Campingfor check-in time parks and access to other state-managed recreation 2:30 p.m., and check-out lands. The pass provides access to millions of acres of time is 1 p.m. parks, wildlife areas, trails, natural areas and • Extra vehicle - $10 water-access sites. The annual passovernight is transferable between two vehicles.per night in designated area each vehicle in excess • Annual pass: $30 •for One-day pass: $10 of the allowed (transaction and dealer feesone may apply)per site. Does not apply to vehicle The Discover Pass can be purchased towed by a recreational online, vehicle.by phone or in person. For details, visit • Pets must be on leash www.discoverpass.wa.gov and under physical or call (866) 320-9933. control at all times. This includes you trail areas Thank for and campsites. Pet supporting owners must clean up after pets Washington state on all state park lands. recreation lands. • Quiet hours are 10 p.m. to 6:30 a.m. State Parks information: (360) 902-8844 Reservations: Online at www.parks.state.wa.us or call (888) CAMPOUT or (888) 226-7688 Washington State Parks Beacon Rock State Park Other state parks located in the general area: Battle Ground Lake, Columbia Hills and Paradise Point Things to remember Connect with us on social media • Park hours – April 1 to Oct. 31, 8 a.m. to dusk. • Winter schedule – Nov. 1 to March 31, 8 a.m. to dusk for day use only. Although most parks are open year round, some parks or portions of parks are closed during the winter. For a winter schedule and information about seasonal closures, visit www.parks.state.wa.us or call the information center at (360) 902-8844. S • Wildlife, plants and all park buildings, signs, tables and other structures are protected; removal or damage of any kind is prohibited. Hunting, feeding of wildlife and gathering firewood on state park property is prohibited. S • One camping party is allowed per site. Maximum of eight people per campsite. • Campsites may not be held for other parties. • Camping check-in time is 2:30 p.m., and check-out time is 1 p.m. • Extra vehicle overnight - $10 per night in designated area for each vehicle in excess of the one allowed per site. Does not apply to vehicle towed by a recreational vehicle. • Pets must be on leash and under physical control at all times. This includes trail areas and campsites. Pet owners must clean up after pets on all state park lands. • Quiet hours are 10 p.m. to 6:30 a.m. • Engine-driven electric generators may be operated only between the hours of 8 a.m. and 9 p.m. www.twitter.com/WAStatePks www.facebook.com/WashingtonStateParks www.youtube.com/WashingtonStateParks Share your stories and photos: Adventure Awaits.com S Sample If you would like to support Washington State Parks even more, please consider making a donation when renewing your license plate tabs. You also may place a check in a donation box when you visit state parks. Sample Donations are a significant part of the State Parks budget and are needed to keep your parks open and operating. For more information, visit www.parks.state.wa.us/donations 018 2017 2 Sample S 016 2019 2 Sample P&R 45-41500-01 (05/17) www.parks.state.wa.us Welcome Beacon BeacontoRock StateRock! Park Ranger station RV sites Picnic area Equestrian trail Fishing Viewpoint Restroom Interpretive trail Showers Parking Boating Biking Kite boarding Rock climbing Upper Hardy Creek Trail Don’s C
Beacon Rock State Park Beacon Rock Trailhead Popular Hikes Beacon Rock 1.8 miles, out and back, The Beacon Rock Trail ascends to the top of Beacon Rock (850’ elevation), one of the world’s largest monoliths. The trail was built directly onto the side of the rock with 52 switchbacks. This amazing trail was originally built between 1915-1918 by philanthropist Henry Biddle. Views include the Columbia River Gorge, Bonneville Dam, and Pierce Wildlife Refuge. Interpretive panels along the trail explain history and geology. easy to moderate, 578’ gain River to Rock Trail 1.5 miles, out and back, easy to moderate, 272’ gain View from Beacon Rock Summit looking east. Beacon Rock trail. River to Rock Trail is the newest trail in the park, it begins at the west end of Beacon Rock trailhead. The trail climbs then descends to a wetland area and Riddell Lake. Enjoy views of Beacon Rock from the west side of the lake then hike through a century old filbert orchard. Quickly descend to a foot bridge across Woodward Creek at Moorage Road. Turn left here to access the Columbia River waterfront. The River to Rock Trail can also be accessed from the boat launch area parking lot. Trails open 8AM-Dusk Foot traffic only Backcountry camping prohibited
Beacon Rock State Park Equestrian Trailhead Popular Hikes West Hardy (multi-use) 5.64 miles, out and back, moderate, 1123’ Hardy Ridge Loop (hiker only) Via West Hardy,Hardy Ridge, East Hardy Trails 7.31 miles, difficult, 1800’ gain Bridge Trail Loop (multi-use) Via East Hardy, Bridge,and Upper Hardy Trails 7.04 miles, moderate, 1004’ gain The Saddle (multi-use) 7.0 miles, out and back, moderate, 1320’ gain Hamilton Mountain Summit (hiker only) 8.7 miles, out and back, difficult, 1658’ gain Trails open 8AM-Dusk The Equestrian trailhead is the only multiuse (equestrian, bicycle, hiker) access point for the park and the trailhead for Hardy Ridge. It is also a great place to start your hike for Hamilton Mountain on a busy weekend day, as there is usually parking available. Head up the moderate, multiuse double track meandering through mature second growth. After a varied climb reach the first trail junction at 1.22 miles. The following are directions to the most popular routes: West Hardy: Go left on West Hardy Trail to head up towards Hardy Ridge. A mile and a quarter up enjoy westerly views, at a little over a mile and half the trail intersects with Hardy Ridge Trail (hiker only), the turn around point for equestrian and bicycles. Hardy Ridge Loop (hiker only): Follow directions above for West Hardy. Hikers continue up Hardy Ridge Trail ascending the recently rerouted switchbacks to the spine of the ridge at 2580’ in two thirds of a mile. Enjoy panoramic views of the Columbia River Gorge. The ridge is abound with wildflowers in spring and early summer. DeHardy Ridge. scend eastward reaching East Hardy Trail (double track) in a little over a half mile. Continue on East Hardy Trail passing an intersection with Bridge Trail at .82 miles, in another .78 miles reach another four way junction with the Equestrian Trail. Go right on Equestrian Trail to return to trailhead in 1.8 miles. Bridge Trail Loop: Go straight following the Equestrian Trail, in .57 miles reach the intersection with East Hardy and Loop Trail. Turn left onto East Hardy Trail, in .78 miles reach Bridge Trail. Turn right and meander through a young forest, with keen eyes look for charred evidence left from the massive Yacolt Burn of 1902. Cross the bridge over Hardy Creek and reach the junction with Upper Hardy Trail in .76 miles. Turn right on Upper Hardy Trail reach the Equestrian Trail in .75 miles, passing Don’s Cuttoff Trail (hiker only) and a backcountry vault toilet along the way. Go right on the Equestrian Trail returning to trailhead in just over 2.5 miles. The Saddle: Go straight following the Equestrian Trail, in .57 miles reach the intersection with East Hardy and Loop Trail, keep straight. The trail descends then crosses over Hardy Creek at .65 miles, this is also the intersection with Hardy Creek Trail (hiker only). Stop here to enjoy a snack at the picnic table. The trail ascends almost immediately crossing an intersection with Upper Hardy Trail, stay to the right here. Steadily climb nearly a mile passing the junction with Don’s Cutoff Trail (hiker only) reaching The Saddle at 2100.’ The views here are spectacular and expansive of the Columbia River Gorge, Bonneville Dam, surrounding Cascade Mountains, Beacon Rock, Table Mountain, and Hardy Ridge. The Saddle is the terminus of the Equestrian Trail, intersecting with Upper Hardy Trails and the Hamilton Mountain Trail (hiker only). Explore the nested Upper Hardy Trails to the north or retrace your steps back to the trailhead. Equestrian, bicycle, foot traffic only Backcountry camping prohibited Looking south from The Saddle at Hamilton Mountain. Hamilton Mountain Summit (hiker only): Follow directions above for The Saddle. From The Saddle go south on the Hamilton Mountain Trail. The mostly open trail reaches the 2438’ summit of Hamilton Mountain in .8 miles.
Beacon Rock State Park Doetsch Walking Path Trailhead The Doetsch Walking Path circles what was once a pasture of the Doetsch family ranch along the Columbia River shoreline. Interpretive panels explain the natural and human history of the area. Popular Hikes Doetsch Walking Path (hiker, bicycle) 1.2 mile, loop easy, no elevation gain The trail is nearly flat with sitting benches, interpretive panels explain the natural and human history of the area. This beautiful trail provides opportunities for nature viewing and bird watching. Views include the Columbia River Gorge and Doetsch Ranch property. Doetsch Day Use path. Trails open 8AM-Dusk Foot traffic or bicycles only Backcountry camping prohibited
Beacon Rock State Park Hadley Trailhead Popular Hikes Little Beacon Rock (ADA accessible) .5 miles, out and back, easy, 96’ gain Hadley Trail (ADA accessible) 1.18 miles, out and back, easy, 138’ gain Rodney Falls, Hardy Falls, Pool of the Winds 2.92 miles, out and back, moderate, 400’ gain Hamilton Mountain Summit 7.2 miles, out and back, difficult, 1838’ gain Hamilton Mountain Summit Loop via Equestrian and Hardy Creek Trail 8.27 miles, difficult, 1838’ gain Via Don’s Cuttoff, Upper Hardy and Hardy Creek Trails 8.66 miles, difficult, 1838’ gain Trails open 8AM-Dusk Foot traffic only Backcountry camping prohibited The Hadley Trailhead is in the main campground, next to campsite #10. The trail starts under power lines then transitions into a mature second growth fir canopy. Only a few steps up the trail, a plaque on a petrified stump designates a grouping of trees known as “Hadley Grove,” honoring Clyde Hadley, the first superintendent of Beacon Rock State Park. Just past the grove, a spur to the right leads to Little Beacon Rock, or stay to the left and continue on the Hadley Trail. At .59 miles the Hadley Trail joins the Hamilton Mountain Trail under power lines. Both the Hadley and Hamilton Mountain Trails were built originally by the CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) in the late 1930’s. Looking down at Rodney Falls from Pool of the Winds. Enjoy views of Bonneville Dam and the surrounding area, either return to the trailhead or continue on the Hamilton Mountain Trail nearly another mile of moderate trail and arrive at Rodney Falls, Hardy Falls and Pool of the Winds. For those seeking the Hamilton Mountain summit, cross the bridge in front of Rodney Falls and continue a quarter mile to the intersection with Hardy Creek Trail. At this point, there are two routes to the summit. Either stay right on the Hamilton Mountain Trail, which is the most direct and steep route reaching the summit in 1.7 miles, hiking through exposed cliff areas abound with wildflowers in spring and summer. Or, turn left on Hardy Creek Trail to reach the summit more gradually. In 1.3 miles turn right on the multiuse Equestrian Trail reaching the The Saddle at 2,100’ after a little over a mile. Rejoin the Hamilton Mountain Trail and hike .8 miles further to the summit at 2,438’. Enjoy expansive panoramic views of the Columbia River Gorge formed by the basalt flows and floods which swept the area over the past 15 million years, as well as surrounding Cascade peaks, Bonneville Dam, Beacon Rock, Table Mountain, and Hardy Ridge.
Beacon Rock State Park Hamilton Mountain Trailhead Popular Hikes Rodney Falls, Hardy Falls, Pool of the Winds 2.52 miles, out and back, moderate, 600’ gain Hamilton Mountain Summit 6.4 miles, out and back, difficult, 2038’ gain The Saddle 8.0 miles, out and back, difficult, 2038’ gain Hamilton Mountain Summit Loop via Equestrian and Hardy Creek Trails The Hamilton Mountain Trail starts out with spectacular douglas fir old growth at the trailhead. Less than half a mile up pass under powerlines and enjoy views of Bonneville Dam. Continue nearly another mile on moderate trail and arrive at Rodney Falls, Hardy Falls and Pool of the Winds. Or, turn left on Hardy Creek Trail to reach the summit more gradually. In 1.3 miles turn right on the multiuse Equestrian Trail reaching the The Saddle at 2,100’ after a little over a mile. Rejoin the Hamilton Mountain Trail and hike .8 miles further to the summit at 2,438’. Enjoy expansive panoramic views of the Columbia River Gorge formed by the basalt flows and floods which swept the area over the past 15 million years, as well as surrounding Cascade peaks, Bonneville Dam, Beacon Rock, Table Mountain, and Hardy Ridge. via Don’s Cuttoff, Upper Hardy and Hardy Creek Trails 8.26 miles, difficult, 2038’ gain Hamilton Mountain trail. Foot traffic only Backcountry camping prohibited from Pool of the Winds. For those seeking the Hamilton Mountain summit, cross the bridge in front of Rodney Falls and continue a quarter mile to the intersection with Hardy Creek Trail. At this point, there are two routes to the summit. Either stay right on the Hamilton Mountain Trail, which is the most direct and steep route, reaching the summit in 1.7 miles, hike through exposed cliff areas abound with wildflowers in spring and summer. 7.87 miles, difficult, 2038’ gain Trails open 8AM-Dusk Looking down at Rodney Falls Alternatively, instead of taking the Equestrian Trail the entire way to The Saddle, take Upper Hardy Trail .74 miles, then take Don’s Cutoff Trail through a beautiful dark section of forest rejoining the Equestrian Trail in a little over a half mile, from here it is In less than a quarter mile to The Saddle.
Beacon Rock State Park River to Rock Trailhead Popular Hikes River to Rock Trail (hiker only) 1.5 miles, out and back, easy to moderate, 272’ gain Beacon Rock (hiker only) River to Rock Trail is the newest trail in the park, it begins just to the north of the railroad overpass on Moorage Road. Start the trail at a foot bridge crossing Woodward Creek, ascend to Riddell Lake hiking through a century old filbert orchard. Enjoy views of Beacon Rock from the west side of the lake. The trail passes under powerlines, climbs then descends ending at the west end of the Beacon Rock trailhead. Retrace your steps back or walk east along the parking lot east to the bulletin board that is start of the Beacon Rock trail. Beacon Rock Trail ascends to the top of Beacon Rock (850’ elevation), one of the world’s largest monoliths. The trail was built directly onto the side of the rock with 52 switchbacks. This amazing trail was originally built between 1915-1918 by philanthropist Henry Biddle. Views include the Columbia River Gorge, Bonneville Dam, and Pierce Wildlife Refuge. Interpretive panels along the trail explain history and geology. 1.8 miles, out and back, easy to moderate, 578’ gain Doetsch Walking Path (hiker, bicycle) 1.2 mile, loop easy, no elevation gain Beacon Rock trail. The Doetsch Walking Path circles what was once a pasture of the Doetsch family ranch along the Columbia River shoreline. Interpretive panels explain the natural and human history of the area. Trails open 8AM-Dusk Foot traffic only (bicycles allowed on Doetsch Walking Path) Doetsch Day Use path. Backcountry camping prohibited View of Beacon Rock (left) and Hamilton
Anderson Lake 8 mi S of Port Townsend Bottle Beach 14 miles W of Aberdeen Bridle Trails 3 mi N of Bellevue, I-405 Centennial Trail several trail heads along Spokane River Columbia Plateau Trail various trail heads between Cheney and Sprague Crawford 11 mi N of Metaline, Boundary Dam Rd Doug’s Beach 7 miles W of Horsethief Lake, SR 14 Federation Forest 18 mi SE of Enumclaw, SR 410 Flaming Geyser 9 mi SW of Black Diamond Fort Columbia 2 mi SE of Chinook, US 101 Fort Simcoe 30 mi W of Toppenish, off US 97 Ginkgo Petrified Forest 1 mi N of Vantage Goldendale Observatory 1 mi N of Goldendale Griffiths–Priday W of Copalis Beach, SR 109 Joseph Whidbey 3 mi W of Oak Harbor Klickitat Trail 31 mi trail from Lyle to centerville Kopachuck 7 mi W of Gig Harbor, SR 16 Lake Sammamish 1 mi NW of Issaquah, I-90 Leadbetter Point 17 mi N of Long Beach, SR 103 Lime Kiln Point W San Juan Island on Haro Strait Loomis Lake 9 mi N of Long Beach, SR 103 Lyons Ferry 102 Lyons Ferry Road & Hwy 261 Mystery Bay W side of Marrowstone Island, at Nordland Nolte 6 mi NE of Enumclaw, on Veazie Cumberland Rd Olallie 4 mi E of North Bend, I-90 Olmstead Place 4 mi E of Ellensburg Pacific Pines 1 mi N of Ocean Park Palouse to Cascades Trail along I-90 Peace Arch 21 mi N of Bellingham, in Blaine Peshastin Pinnacles 2 mi W of Cashmere, N Dryden Rd Rockport 8 mi E of Concrete Sacajawea 5 mi SE of Pasco, US 12 Saint Edward NE end of Lk Washington, Juanita Drive Shine Tidelands 7 mi S of Port Ludlow South Whidbey 7 mi. N of Freeland Squak Mountain 2 mi S of Issaquah Steptoe Butte 12 mi N of Colfax Tolmie 8 mi NE of Olympia Triton Cove 7 mi S of Dosewallips, US 101 Westport Light 22 mi SW of Aberdeen Willapa Hills Trail 22 mi from Chehalis to S.Bend 3B 1D 4C 9C 9A 4F 4D 4D 2E 5E 6D 5F 1D 3B 4E 3D 4C 1E 3B 1E 8E 3B 4D 4C 5D 1E 5D 3A 5C 4B 7E 4C 3C 3B 4C 9D 3D 3C 1D 2F L M L M LM L LM MU LM - T M M - C C L C C L C C L C C L C L - P P P P W B BP P - Capacit y WGFEP WFP W WG W WG WFP W WFC WGF WGFBP EWB WGFP B W WP W PW GWF WP PW WP WGFP W BEWGFP WP W W W WP W WGFP FBWP BWGFHP WP W W BWFE WFP WP WFBP WFBP WFPB WP P W WGFPB W EWGPB W WP FHWBP WBG WP W W B BGWFEP WGFBCP W WGP W W W W W Capacit y (K)itche n, (V)ault T (P)icnic Shelte r, oilet, (C )ampfire (R)estroom, Circle Beach E xplorati on Bird Wa tching Ball Fie lds Boating Boating (non-m otorized Fishing only) or Shell fish Interpre tive Cen ter/Muse Scuba D um iving Swimm ing Water-sk iing Playgro und Eq uipmen t Hiking Mounta in Bikin g Equestri an Cross­–c ountry Skiing Snowm obiling Shelter Campin g 45/85® PVC 64 PVC 4 64® R 200® KVCP 2 40/40®/40 PRC 100® VC 1 20 P© 75® PRC 50© VC 100© RC 150/150® RC(2) 96® VC 50® CR 4 80®/30® PVC 60® P®VC 40/100® PVC 2 60© PV contact park directly 40® PRC 80® KRC 2 56® V 2 50® RC 50® RCP 80® RC 40® PVC 50/50© KVC 100/100© VC 130® PRC 200® PRC 40® KPRC 60 PRC® 60© PVC 40®/30® PRC 48®/80® VCR 50® PVC 50® VC 60© PRC 80/80/80® PRC 60/40® VC 50® PVC 70 PVC® 25 PRC® 40® PVC 50/24/24 PRC 1 100© CR 48/20© P(2)V 75® RCVP 50® CR 50® PRC 300® PRC® - 400 P*V • • • • • • • • 150 K® • • • • • • • 175 P®V • • • • • • 100/100 PK/K*®R • • • • • • 50/72 (2)P*K®R • • • • • • • • • 125® P©RK* • • • • • • • 100/100 P®/P®R • • • • • • • • K© • • • • 200* r • • • • • • • • 50/50 RK*(2) • • • - • • • • • • • • • • 44/12 K©P*RC • • • • • • • • • - • • • • • - • • • 50/25 P® CR K® • • • • • • • 40 R* • • • • • 100 K® • • • • • • • • 50/50 RP®/P®V • • • • • • 32/3004K®/7P®R • • • • • • • • • 50 P®/R • • • 50/50 K®KP • - • • • • • • • 50/150 P®V • • • • • • 100 P®RC • • • • • • • • • • 100© KRPC • • • • • • 70+ KRCP® • • • • • • • • • - • • • - • • • • • • 50/75© 4PR© • • • • • • • • • 25 K®(2)RC*P* • • • • • • 50 PV© • • • • • • • 75 K®P®(3)R • • • • • 200 K®RP*(2)© • • • • • • • • • 52 K* • • • • • • • • • - • • • • • 35 K® • • • • • 80/12 P®/P*R • • • • • • • 50/100 P®(2)R • • • • • • • • 100 K©P*R • • • 40 P©KR • • • • • • 100/150/K(2)®/K* • • • • • • • 20/150/20 P®/3 • • • • • • • • 50/50 P*(2) • • • • • • 50/50/50 P®/P*(2)RC • • • • • 100P®/P*(2)RK®C • • • • • • 75 PRK© • 40/40/40 P(2)P ® • • • • • • 50/50 P® • • • - • • • - • • - • • • • • - • • • • • - RCP*(2)V • • • • • • • 3P* • • • • • • • 50® P • • • • • • 150 K©/K*R • • • • • 35 KR • • • • • • 60 (5)K*K® • • • • • • • 50/80 (4)P ® • • • • • • • 100 P® • • • • • • • • 100/25® PRC • • • • 100 K®RC • • • • 40/40/10* P® • •

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