Dungeness

National Wildlife Refuge - Washington

The Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge is located near the town of Sequim in Clallam County, Washington, on the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The refuge includes Dungeness Spit, Graveyard Spit, and portions of Dungeness Bay and Harbor. Dungeness Spit is one of the world's longest natural sand spits, 6.8 miles (10.9 km) long and very narrow. A lighthouse, the New Dungeness Light, built in 1857, is located near the end of the spit. Access to Dungeness Spit is through a Clallam County Park which has hiking trails, picnic areas, and a campground. Dungeness is one of six refuges in the Washington Maritime National Wildlife Refuge Complex.

maps

Official Visitor Map of Olympic National Park (NP) in Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Olympic - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Olympic National Park (NP) in Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Washington State Highways / Tourist Map. Published by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT).Washington State - Highway Map

Map of Washington State Highways / Tourist Map. Published by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT).

brochures

Brochure of Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Dungeness - Brochure

Brochure of Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Tearsheet of Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Dungeness - Tearsheet

Tearsheet of Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Wildlife at Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Dungeness - Wildlife

Wildlife at Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Dungeness NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/dungeness/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dungeness_National_Wildlife_Refuge The Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge is located near the town of Sequim in Clallam County, Washington, on the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The refuge includes Dungeness Spit, Graveyard Spit, and portions of Dungeness Bay and Harbor. Dungeness Spit is one of the world's longest natural sand spits, 6.8 miles (10.9 km) long and very narrow. A lighthouse, the New Dungeness Light, built in 1857, is located near the end of the spit. Access to Dungeness Spit is through a Clallam County Park which has hiking trails, picnic areas, and a campground. Dungeness is one of six refuges in the Washington Maritime National Wildlife Refuge Complex.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge “In every outthrust headland, in every curving beach, in every grain of sand there is a story of the earth.” Heerman’s gulls ©Dow Lambert — Rachel Carson Introduction The “Blue Goose,” designed by J.N. “Ding” Darling, has become the symbol of the National Wildlife Refuge System. At Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge one of the world’s longest natural sand spits softens the rough sea waves to form a tranquil bay, fertile tideflats, and beaches of sand and gravel. Here wildlife find food, a place to rest, and protection from winds and pounding surf. Recognizing the area’s importance to wildlife, President Woodrow Wilson declared Dungeness Spit and its surrounding waters a National Wildlife Refuge in 1915. Dungeness is one of over 500 refuges in the National Wildlife Refuge System. A network of lands set aside specifically for wildlife, the System is our living heritage, conserving wildlife and habitat for generations to come. Activities Dungeness NWR is open to the public year-round. Hiking, wildlife watching, and photography are popular activities on the Refuge. Some areas are closed seasonally or permanently to protect sensitive species. Location West of Sequim on Highway 101, turn north on Kitchen-Dick Road. Continue 3 miles to Dungeness County Recreation Area. Pass through the recreation area to reach the Refuge parking lot. Dungeness Spit Dungeness NWR WASHINGTON Dungeness Rec. Area Lotzgesell Road KitchenDick Rd. SEQUIM To Port Angeles 0 Dungeness Spit ©Long Bach Nguyen 1 2 101 3 MILES To Port Townsend History of the Refuge The Market Hunting Era S’Klallam people digging clams. Ornithologist Walter Taylor reported, “During the months of November and December, 1913, and January and February, 1914, no less than 3,000 black brants are reported to have been killed in the vicinity of Smith Island [20 miles from Dungeness] by hunters who pursued them by the use of power boats, most of the birds being killed in the kelp beds offshore.” ©North Olympic Library, Bert Kellogg Collection Traditional S’Klallam Use A Beacon for Mariners The New Dungeness Lighthouse USFWS For thousands of years S’Klallam people visited Dungeness Spit to gather shellfish, hunt waterfowl, and bury their dead. In 1872 the S’Klallam were forced from their villages along the Dungeness River by Euro-American homesteaders and spent a difficult year living on the Spit. In 1875 they bought 222 acres to establish the settlement of Jamestown east of the Dungeness River. The tribe secured Federal recognition in 1980. On December 14, 1857 the New Dungeness Lighthouse became the first operational light in the Salish Sea. The lighthouse was 100 feet tall at first, but was lowered to 63 feet in 1927 because of cracking in the tower. Originally equipped with an oil-burning light and a bell, these signals were progressively replaced with newer technology and power sources. The lighthouse was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1993. Today visitors may hike to the lighthouse and enjoy breathtaking views from the signal tower. Many people depended on the rich bounty of fish, shellfish, and waterfowl in the waters surrounding Dungeness Spit for their livelihood. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, this was a prime area for waterfowl hunters who supplied restaurants in Seattle. A new invention — the power boat — allowed these “market” hunters easy access to flocks of brant that wintered in the area. Crabbing on Dungeness Bay, ca. 1900. ©North Olympic Library, Bert Kellogg Collection Public concern over rapidly dwindling numbers of geese and ducks led to the establishment of Dungeness NWR in 1915. Habitats of the Refuge The Power of Erosion About 10,000 years ago, melting glaciers left thick deposits of sand and gravel along this shoreline. As waves carved steep bluffs from these deposits the material was gradually pushed north and east from the headland, creating Dungeness Spit. Weather and waves continue to erode away the bluffs feeding the five-milelong Spit, causing it to lengthen about 13 feet (4.4m) per year. Western sandpiper ©Dow Lambert Dungeness Harbor and Bay Protected from heavy surf and fertilized by nutrients washing down from the land above, Dungeness Bay and Harbor teem with fish and invertebrates. Eelgrass beds in the Bay provide food for brant, and a nursery for young Dungeness crab, flounder, salmon, steelhead, and cutthroat trout. In winter, flocks of waterfowl, loons, and grebes find food and shelter here. Dungeness Spit and the bluffs overlooking it create a variety of habitats that are home to 244 bird species, 18 types of land mammals, and 11 marine mammal species. Refuge Diversity Bald eagle Peter Davis/USFWS Forest and Bluffs On the bluffs above the Spit, coniferous forests host black-tailed deer, songbirds, and raptors. Tree snags are convenient lookouts for bald eagles. The bluffs are home to pigeon gui
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Dungeness In Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge, one of the world’s longest natural sand spits softens the rough sea waves to form a shallow, quiet bay and harbor rich in marine life. These calm waters and tideflats provide wildlife protection from winds and pounding surf and a place to rest and feed. Eelgrass beds supply food for large flocks of brant and create a nursery for young salmon and steelhead. Refuge tideflats teem with migrating shorebirds in spring and fall while an impressive diversity of waterfowl congregate in the tranquil waters throughout the winter. DUNGE N ES SR IVE R National Wildlife Refuge A Haven for Wildlife A Place for Wildlife and People Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge, one in a system of National Wildlife Refuges throughout the country, protects critical habitat for wildlife and provides viewing opportunities for people. To ensure that wildlife continue to have a place to rest and feed, some recreational activities are allowed only in selected areas during certain times of the year. Portions of the Refuge are closed for public safety and to provide sanctuary for wildlife during critical feeding, resting, and nesting times. Visit the Refuge during different seasons to see the variety of wildlife that use Refuge habitats. Guide to Refuge Activities and Regulations Location West of Sequim on Highway 101, turn north on Kitchen-Dick Road. Continue 3 miles to Voice of America Road. Pass through the Dungeness Recreation Area to reach the Refuge parking lot. Hours The Refuge is open daily from sunrise to sunset. Entrance Fees $3.00 daily entrance fee covers up to 4 adults (16 and older). Children under 16 enter free. Refuge Annual Pass, Federal Recreational Lands Pass, Senior or Golden Age Pass, Access or Golden Access Pass, Military Pass, Volunteer Pass, and a Federal Duck Stamp also admit family or group (up to 4 adults). Hiking Trails An easy 1/2 mile trail takes visitors through the forest to an overlook on the bluff above Dungeness Spit. The trail continues down a steep hill to the Spit and becomes a 5 mile beach walk to the lighthouse (11 miles round trip). Please stay on designated trails (main or primitive trail) as the upland forest is otherwise closed to public entry to protect wildlife. The bluff areas are unstable and extremely hazardous. They are closed to the public. Boating From May 15 to September 30, boating (no wake) is allowed up to the 100-yard buffer. Refuge waters are closed to boating from October 1 to May 14. Boating Access Public boat launches are located off-Refuge on Cline Spit and the Dungeness Landing which can be accessed from Marine Drive. Boats may land only at the designated landing site directly south of the New Dungeness Light Station from 9am to 5pm. Advance reservations required; call 360/457 8451. Fishing and Shellfishing Beach Use The Strait side of Dungeness Spit is open to saltwater fishing year-round, except for the area beyond the lighthouse. Tidelands in Dungeness Bay and Harbor, excluding closed areas shown on Refuge maps, are open to shellfishing May 15 to Sept. 30. Access east and west of Graveyard Spit is by boat only. Washington State fishing regulations and health closures apply. All oysters are privately owned and may not be harvested. Hiking, wildlife observation and photography, and fishing are allowed in the green zone year round. Jogging is allowed only on the west beach adjacent to the bluffs west of Dungeness Spit. Closed Areas (Year-Round) Graveyard Spit, portions of Dungeness Spit, a 100-yard buffer zone around these areas, and all bluff areas are closed to public entry. Prohibited Activities To minimize disturbance to wildlife, some uses are not allowed including, but not limited to: jet skiing and wind-surfing on Refuge waters, pets, hunting, bicycling, kite flying, flying machines, ball-playing, Frisbees, fires, camping, and disturbing or removing any resources from the Refuge (except for fish and shellfish during designated seasons). Marine Mammals Harbor seals and their pups rest on Refuge shores and should not be approached or disturbed. They are protected by the federal Marine Mammal Protection Act. Camping No camping is allowed on the Refuge. For information on camping call the Dungeness Recreation Area, 360/683 5847. Lighthouse Tours Daily tours of the historic New Dungeness Lighthouse are offered from 9am to 5pm by volunteers of the New Dungeness Light Station Association. Accessibility Visitors should examine their own abilities and limitations before visiting the Refuge. Consult tides for hiking conditions. Contact the Refuge office for suggestions on using the area safely. Volunteer Program Dungeness Refuge has an active program of volunteers helping with public information, education, maintenance, and wildlife protection. If you would like to become involved, call the Refuge office. For more information, contact: Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge Watchable Wildlife Introduction Home for Wildlife Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge was set aside by executive order in 1915 as a refuge, preserve, and breeding ground for native birds. Located in the northwest corner of Washington State on the Salish Sea, approximately 60 miles northwest of Seattle, it offers a diversified habitat of sand beaches, protected bay waters, seagrass beds, mudflats, and forested and grass uplands. ©Guy Monty Good wildlife viewing opportunities occur throughout the year on the Refuge. In winter, the area is important to sea ducks and other waterfowl who feed and find storm shelter in the protected waters of Dungeness Bay. The Bay remains an important migration stop and wintering ground for brant. Many shorebird species also feed on the shorelines and mudflats during the spring and fall migrations with a few species overwintering on the Refuge. Bald eagles and other raptors are commonly seen year round on the Refuge. Harlequin duck Brant. ©Guy Monty Summer brings nesting songbirds to the forested and grass uplands and on to the spits. Often visitors see harbor seals swimming in the marine waters and hauling out on shore to rest and nurse their pups within the protection of the Refuge boundaries. Visitors have also spotted other marine mammals, such as orca and minke whales, in the Refuge waters. About this Checklist The following fish and wildlife species list includes 244 species of birds, 29 species of mammals, 8 species of reptiles and amphibians, and 26 species of fish that are found on the Refuge. Since most birds are migratory, their seasonal occurrence and abundance, as well as associated habitats are coded. The list was prepared with the assistance of Bob Boekelheide, Rod Norvell and other knowledgeable birders. If you see something rare or unusual, please share the information with the Refuge biologist. We will periodically update this checklist with new information and we welcome your wildlife sightings on the Refuge. Bird species are listed according to the seventh edition (1998) American Ornithologists’ Union checklist and the 52nd supplement to that checklist (August 2011). Symbols used in this list are defined on the following page. Wildlife List Key Wildlife Watching Tips Seasons Sp S F W - Spring (March-May) Summer (June-July) Fall (August-November) Winter (December-February) Patience and Magnification Viewing marine birds can be challenging. At first glance the waters appear empty, but slowly scan the area with binoculars or a scope for a closer look. Seasonal Abundance a - abundant – occurring in large numbers in proper habitat - common – likely to be seen or heard in proper habitat - uncommon – present, but not certain to be seen - occasional – present only a few times a season, but may be more common in habitat adjacent to the Refuge - rare – may be present but not every year - irruptive – occurs in large numbers some years, but is absent in others - hypothetical – within normal range, but not recently documented - accidental – outside of normal range Natural Blinds Some areas are closed to public entry to provide wildlife sanctuary. Watch for closed area signs and stay to the north, or strait-side, as you view wildlife from the cover of driftwood. Nature's Soundtrack Walk quietly in designated areas, being aware of sounds. Teach children quiet observation. Other wildlife watchers will appreciate your consideration. Super Sleuthing Be aware of animal sounds, smells, and signs. Tracks, scat, feathers, and nests left behind tell interesting stories. Wild Diets Don’t share your food. Your lunch could disrupt wild digestive systems. Family Ties Leave all young animals alone. A parent is probably close by waiting for you to leave. c u o r i h x A symbol (*) precedes species known to nest or breed on the Refuge. Threatened or endangered species are preceded by (✔) symbol. The “H” column lists the habitat types that are found on the Refuge in which the listed bird species can be found. The habitat codes are as follows: f g h m s t b o - mixed coniferous/deciduous forest grassland hedges/shrubs marsh/pond sand spit/strand tideflats/open mudflats bay marine open marine Bufflehead Peter Davis/USFWS Habitat Birds of Dungeness NWR Common Name Common Name Habitat Sp S F W Loons Red-throated Loon Pacific Loon Common Loon Yellow-billed Loon ob ob ob ob u c c r u c c r c c c r Grebes Pied-billed Grebe Horned Grebe Red-necked Grebe Eared Grebe Western Grebe mb ob ob ob ob o c c o u o c c o u o c c o u r r r r r r r r Fulmars, Petrels and Shearwaters Northern Fulmar o Sooty Shearwater o Short-tailed Shearwater o Storm-Petrels Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel Leach’s Storm-Petrel o o Pelicans Brown Pelican ob Cormorants Brandt’s Cormorant Double-crested Cormorant Pelagic Cormorant ob bo bo Bitterns, Herons and Egrets American Bittern Great Blue Heron Green

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