Ridgefield

National Wildlife Refuge - Washington

Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge is located in the westernmost part of Clark County, Washington. The refuge provides vital habitat for wintering waterfowl with an emphasis on the dusky Canada goose whose nesting areas in Alaska were severely impacted by the violent earthquake of 1964. Stately sandhill cranes, shorebirds, and a great variety of songbirds stop at the refuge during spring and fall migrations. Some bird species such as mallards, canada geese, great blue herons, pheasant, ruffed grouse, barn owl, great horned owl, bald eagles, ospreys and red-tailed hawks are year-round residents that nest on the refuge. Black-tailed deer and cougars are the largest mammals on the refuge. Smaller mammal species such as coyote, red fox, raccoon, skunk, porcupine, bobcat, beaver, mink, river otter, muskrat, badger and brush rabbits are occasionally seen.

maps

Map of Washington State Highways / Tourist Map. Published by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT).Washington State - Highway Map

Map of Washington State Highways / Tourist Map. Published by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT).

brochures

Brochure of Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Ridgefield - Brochure

Brochure of Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Map of Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Ridgefield - Map

Map of Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Map of the River 'S' Unit of Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Ridgefield - River 'S' Unit Map

Map of the River 'S' Unit of Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Wildlife at Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Ridgefield - Wildlife

Wildlife at Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Hunting at Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Ridgefield - Hunting

Hunting at Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Ridgefield NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/ridgefield https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ridgefield_National_Wildlife_Refuge Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge is located in the westernmost part of Clark County, Washington. The refuge provides vital habitat for wintering waterfowl with an emphasis on the dusky Canada goose whose nesting areas in Alaska were severely impacted by the violent earthquake of 1964. Stately sandhill cranes, shorebirds, and a great variety of songbirds stop at the refuge during spring and fall migrations. Some bird species such as mallards, canada geese, great blue herons, pheasant, ruffed grouse, barn owl, great horned owl, bald eagles, ospreys and red-tailed hawks are year-round residents that nest on the refuge. Black-tailed deer and cougars are the largest mammals on the refuge. Smaller mammal species such as coyote, red fox, raccoon, skunk, porcupine, bobcat, beaver, mink, river otter, muskrat, badger and brush rabbits are occasionally seen.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge The banks of the lower Columbia River in southwest Washington have been alive with activity for thousands of years. Ancient human civilizations thrived here and shared the land with an abundance of animal and plant life. Although the ancient people have long since departed their prehistoric dwellings, wildlife persists in an area with generations of oak trees and remnant river channels. This place is Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge. Sandhill cranes in flight over the refuge / ©Jim Cruce A River’s Generosity Creates a Paradise for Waterfowl… Dusky Canada geese ©Montana Waterfowl Foundation American bittern ©Vaughn Ruppert Opposite: River otters ©Jim Cruce Below: Virginia rail ©Wilson Cady The Columbia River has long been generous with its bountiful resources. It has sustained the lives of people, wildlife, and plants for millennia. Today, the river continues its tradition of giving by producing hydroelectric power and providing places for industry and recreation. Unfortunately, some of the demands on the river come at a high cost to fish, wildlife, and their habitats. Dikes, dams, development, disturbance, and pollution have taken their toll. Only a few natural areas maintained for wildlife remain along the river today. Along the lower reaches of the Columbia River lies Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge(NWR). The 5,218 acres of Refuge contain a lush mixture of seasonal, semi-permanent, and permanent wetlands, grasslands, riparian corridors, and forests of Douglas-fir and Oregon white oak. These habitats, combined with a mild, rainy winter climate, provide an ideal environment for migrating birds and wintering waterfowl. Each fall, the Refuge comes alive with thousands of ducks, geese, and swans. These birds depart their northern nesting areas and migrate down the Pacific Coast or over the Cascades to escape the harsh Alaskan and Canadian winters. On Ridgefield NWR, they find precious resting and feeding areas where they spend the winter months preparing to meet the demands of spring migration and the nesting season. Olympia 5 82 Washington Yakima 12 Astoria LocatorLongview Woodland Ridgefield NWR Portland …and also a Paradise for People The “Blue Goose,” designed by conservationist J.N. “Ding” Darling in 1934, is the symbol of the National Wildlife Refuge System. 97 Vancouver 84 Oregon Visitors to Ridgefield NWR may enjoy viewing a variety of wildlife within a few minutes of the PortlandVancouver metropolitan area. The Refuge landscape provides santuary throughout the seasons for waterfowl, shorebirds, raptors, river otter, black-tailed deer, coyotes, and other species of wildlife. The Refuge also offers a place for people to keep in touch with their “wild” neighbors. For many, this is a place to learn about and appreciate the splendor of the natural areas that once occurred in abundance along the lower Columbia River. Ridgefield NWR is one of over 540 refuges in the National Wildlife Refuge System managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The 94 million acre Refuge System is the only nationwide network of Federal lands managed specifically for the conservation of fish and wildlife. Refuges serve to protect our nation’s natural and cultural resources for people of all ages and for generations to come. Dusky Canada Geese: A Refuge to Call Their Own Western painted turtle hatchling ©Joe Engler/USFWS Background: Western Canada geese ©Jim Cruce Ridgefield NWR was established in 1965 to provide wintering habitat for the dusky subspecies of Canada goose. This large dark-breasted goose had recently undergone a crisis created by nature. A violent earthquake rocked southern Alaska in 1964 elevating the Copper River Delta by six feet. In a matter of minutes, the primary nesting area for dusky Canada geese was permanently changed. Over time, the marshy, coastal wetlands that had been nesting habitat for dusky Canada geese were invaded by willows and alders. The resulting shrub thickets provided perfect cover for hungry brown bears and coyotes allowing them to approach nesting geese without being noticed. The altered habitat and increased predation greatly reduced the geese’s success in hatching and raising their young. This resulted in a dramatic decline in the dusky Canada goose population. Coyote ©Jim Cruce Refuge volunteer ©USFWS Although the effects of the earthquake on the Copper River Delta could not be reversed, measures were taken by the Service to ensure dusky Canada geese would have secure wintering habitat. The dusky Canada goose winters along the lower Columbia River and in the Willamette Valley of Oregon. Establishment of Ridgefield NWR secured vital wintering habitat for geese. Service biologists work cooperatively with state wildlife agencies in the effort to monitor wintering goose populations. Other important species monitored on the Refuge include painted turtles, bald eagles, great blue herons,
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge CARTY UNIT Gee Creek Oaks To Wetlands Wildlife Trail La ke R ORE GON WAS HIN GTO N ive N (Open Daily Year-round) r Cathlapotle Plankhouse Refuge Office 28908 NW Main Ave. N. Main Ave. Carty Lake Pioneer To I-5 S. BACHELOR ISLAND UNIT SANCTUARY St. 501 9 th Av e. Information/ Visitor Contact Station Kiwa Hiking Trail (Open May 1 - Sep 30) Co Parking Prohibited Hiking Trail er Riv Wheelchair Accessible Observation Blind 4.2-mi Auto Tour Road ROTH UNIT Lake Rive r bia lum Refuge Office ll be p m Ca ough Sl ke La ell Lake Refuge/Unit Boundary R t es Campb Bachelor Slough Bower Slough Pets Auto Tour Route Artifact Collecting Observation Blind Bicycles Restrooms RIDGEPORT DAIRY UNIT Camping Off-road Driving Miles 0 0 Kilometers Post Office Lake Fires * Closed Due to Access Road Damage 1 1 Lower River Road *
Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge River ‘S’ Unit Refuge Office: 28908 NW Main Ave. Ridgefield, WA 501 Ridgefield Plantain Pond St Auto Tour Route S. 9th LEGEND t ad Ro Slo ug h N. Tree Lake Tree Lake Riv er N. Quigley Lake S. Mantrap Lake Bull Lake 4 3 Ba ch elo r 2 West Lake 1 5 Burlingt o n Teal Marsh Horse Lake S. Quigley Lake N. East Lake 6 No rt h ern Accessible Facilities Parking Lot Restroom Interpretive Markers La ke Mille t Lake s ur llh Hi N. Mantrap Lake Open May 1 to Sept. 30) 1 - Hiking Trail Dike Information/Visitor Contact Station Observation Blind Kiwa Hiking Trail (Kiwa t r ee (From Oct. 1 to Apr. 30 Visitors required to stay in vehicle along Auto Route) Long Lake Boardwalk Pintail Marsh Deep Lake Middle Lake S ant e Fe R ailr oa S. East Lake Ruddy Lake 7 14 8 d N 9 CanvasbackParking & Accessible Lake Facilities Available at South Lake the Observation Blind & Kiwa Trail 13 Sora Marsh Rest Lake 10 11 12 Schwartz Lake South Big Lake bia lum Co OlympiaJ 82 WASHINGTON 5 Yakima 12  FEET er Riv  METERS Astoria Longview 97 Woodland Ridgefield Vancouver Portland 84 OREGON
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge Wildlife Checklist “I slept but very little last night for the noise kept up during the whole of the night by the swans, geese...brant (and) ducks on a small sand island... they were immensley numerous and their noise horrid.” Capt. William Clark Lewis and Clark Journal Lower Columbia River November 5, 1805 The Pacific Flyway Welcome to Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge Cover photo cackling Canada geese © Jim Cruce Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, located on the lower Columbia River floodplain adjacent to Ridgefield, Washington, provides 5,150 acres of vital migration and wintering habitat for birds migrating through the region west of the Cascade Mountains in the Pacific Flyway. The mild, rainy winter climate, combined with important remnant wetlands along the Columbia River, create ideal resting and feeding areas for a variety of species, including ducks, geese, swans, sandhill cranes and provides a key wintering area for the dusky subspecies of Canada goose. A variety of other wildlife also lives in the diversity of habitats found on the refuge. Birds of Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge The grassland and wetland habitats of Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge are best known for the spectacular concentrations of migratory waterfowl they attract during the winter. Seven subspecies of Canada geese occur here. Both trumpeter and tundra swans return every winter accompanied by their gray colored immature offspring. In late winter, shorebirds flock together in search of food hiding in the mudflats. Early spring brings the passerines and songbirds. Bald eagles nest here and are often seen causing a ruckus among ducks and other potential prey. Other nesting birds include herons, owls, some species of ducks, songbirds and sparrows. The Oaks to Wetlands Trail of the Carty Unit passes through Oregon white oak and Douglas fir forests, lush understory vegetation and by numerous wetlands and meadows. A Chinook Indian village originating in ancient times once existed here. The people hunted the elk, deer and birds that roamed the land. Lewis and Clark visited the village, camped here and described this place and its people. The Carty Unit exists today as it did then. It is not protected by flood dikes, thus water levels are dependent upon the rise and fall of the Columbia River. Expect more water during the spring snowmelt and during winter rains. Wildlife Watching Tips You will be most successful at viewing wild animals in their natural habitats if you use binoculars or a spotting scope. This equipment will help you observe wildlife from a distance and minimize disturbance. Wild animals, especially waterfowl are easily disturbed by humans and may be forced to use vital energy reserves trying to escape from their feeding and roosting areas. For this reason, be aware of special refuge seasonal regulations on public use activities during the fall and winter seasons. Wildlife watching is best shortly after sunrise and close to sunset. This will enhance your chances of seeing both nighttime and daytime active animals. Unusual Sightings? If you see any unusual sighting such as a species observed out of its normal season, in large numbers, or a new species not listed, please report your information to the refuge biologist at the address and phone number listed on the back cover of this leaflet. This information is greatly appreciated and will aid in future updates to this list. In addition it will provide the biologist with information about species occurances and populations on the refuge. Ridgefield is truly an amazing showcase of birds of the Pacific Flyway. Birding experiences vary upon the season of the year as you will see by the list that follows. We hope you will enjoy the birds and your visit! Pied-billed grebe Season Symbols Season Abundance Symbols Sp - Spring (March through May) S - Summer (June and July) F - Fall (August through November) W - Winter (December through February) N - Notes * - Birds known to nest on the refuge ✔ - Endangered or Threatened c u o r ac - Common, certain to be seen in suitable habitat Uncommon, present but not certain to be seen Occasionally seen Rare, known to be present, but not every year Accidental Birds of Ridgefield NWR Common Name N Sp S F W Loons Red-throated loon r r o Pacific loon r r Common loon r r r Grebes Pied-billed grebe * c c c Horned grebe o o Red-necked grebe r Eared grebe r Western grebe o o c r r o Pelicans American white pelican r r Cormorants Double-crested cormorant c o u u Bitterns, Herons, Egrets and Ibis American bittern * c u u o Great blue heron * c c c c Great egret * u u u u Cattle egret r r Green heron o o o r Black-crowned night-heron o o r r White-faced ibis ac ac American Vultures Turkey vulture u u u r Greater white-fronted goose u r u Emperor goose r Snow goose o o Ross goo
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge Hunting Regulations 2020–2021 Welcome Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1965 along the Columbia River to “provide wintering habitat for the dusky subspecies of Canada goose.” The 5300-acre refuge contains wetlands, grasslands, riparian corridors, and forests. These habitats provide a home for native species, including wintering waterfowl. Waterfowl hunting is offered on approximately 760 acres in a spaced blind area on the River S Unit. (Refuge Office Closed to Public) Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge Complex 28908 N Main Ridgefield, WA 98642 U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service 360-887-4106 Ridgefieldhunt@fws.gov http://www.fws.gov/Refuge/Ridgefield September 2020 Safety Any injuries or accidents occurring on the Refuge must be reported immediately to the check station staff or to the Refuge Manager. Please, also promptly report any hazardous conditions requiring attention. Firearms Persons possessing, transporting, or carrying firearms on National Wildlife Refuge System lands must comply with all provisions of State and local law. Persons may only use (discharge) firearms in accordance with refuge regulations (50 CFR 27.42 and specific refuge regulations in 50 CFR Part 32.) Vehicles Licensed motor vehicles are permitted only on public use roads and as shown on the map. ATVs and UTVs are prohibited. Accessibility Information Equal opportunity to participate in and benefit from programs and activities of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is available to all individuals regardless of physical or mental ability. For more information please contact the U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Equal Opportunity, https://www.doi.gov/pmb/eeo/public-civil-rights. Hunting Regulations Hunting regulations are designed to provide safe recreational opportunities through wise use of renewable wildlife resources. Hunting is permitted in accordance with Federal regulations governing public use on National Wildlife Refuges as set forth in Title 50 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Hunting will be in accordance with applicable State of Washington regulations subject to the conditions stated below. Access/ Check-in Hunters may only access the Refuge two hours before legal sunrise until two hours after legal sunset or after the last hunter has left the hunt area, whichever is earliest. See calendar for details for hunt days. Only hunting parties with a reservation holder will be permitted to check-in for the morning draw at 1 hour and 45 minutes before legal shooting time. All standby hunting opportunities will begin at 10 am. Upon checkin, the hunter check station attendant will check your hunting license and duck stamp, and supply you with both a fee envelope and a Migratory Bird Harvest Report form. Once check-in is complete, you may proceed to your assigned blind. The Migratory Bird Hunt Report form is stamped as your receipt, and must be carried with you while hunting. Hunters must park in designated parking areas, as identified on the map. Dogs The use of a trained retriever is encouraged but not required to minimize waste of harvested waterfowl. Dogs must be kept on leash in parking lots and while hiking to/from blinds. Pet waste must be removed, as it is unhealthy for wildlife and water quality. This is a unit of the National Wildlife Refuge System, a network of lands and waters managed for the benefit of wildlife and people. Harvest Reporting/ Check out All hunters must check out at the hunter check station, complete a Migratory Bird Harvest Report and present all harvested birds for inspection. The check station operator will verify the identification of all harvested birds, as well as compliance with bag limits and other hunting regulations. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge Hunt Check Station & Reservation Lottery Reservation Lottery (optional) Reservations give hunters first blind picks during the morning check-in but are not required to hunt. Successful reservation applicants are randomly selected by a computer drawing. Reservations are not transferable and are valid until 1 3/4 hours before legal shooting time on the day of the reservation. Reservations lost due to an emergency, weather or safety issue imposed by the CDC/State related closure will not be reissued or refunded. Reservations for the entire season will be generated in one pre-season lottery and must be submitted electronically (Paper applications not accepted) by 3:30 pm on September 17, 2020 along with accompanying payment (postmark not accepted). Only one application per person is allowed. The application is online at: www. fws.gov/refuge/Ridgefield/visit/ waterfowl_hunting.html Changes for 2020-2021 Hunt Season: Due to the Coronavirus pandemic programmatic changes have been made that must be followed to maintain hunter, staff and community safety. See below for further details. General: Species open to hunting – duck, goos

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