"Mt. Hood at Steigerwald Lake NWR in WA" by Jeff Hollett , public domain

Steigerwald Lake

National Wildlife Refuge - Washington

Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge is located on the Columbia River, 10 miles (16 km) east of Vancouver, Washington. It consists of historic riverine flood plain habitat, semi-permanent wetlands, cottonwood-dominated riparian corridors, pastures, and remnant stands of Oregon white oak.

maps

Recreation map of the Western Area of Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Columbia River Gorge - Recreation Map West

Recreation map of the Western Area of Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Visitor map of Gifford Pinchot National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Gifford Pinchot - Visitor Map

Visitor map of Gifford Pinchot National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Map of Washington State Highways / Tourist Map. Published by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT).Washington State - Highway Map

Map of Washington State Highways / Tourist Map. Published by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT).

brochures

Brochure of Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Steigerwald Lake - Brochure

Brochure of Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Map of Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Steigerwald Lake - Map

Map of Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Wildlife at Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Steigerwald Lake - Wildlife

Wildlife at Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Steigerwald Lake NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/steigerwald_lake https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steigerwald_Lake_National_Wildlife_Refuge Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge is located on the Columbia River, 10 miles (16 km) east of Vancouver, Washington. It consists of historic riverine flood plain habitat, semi-permanent wetlands, cottonwood-dominated riparian corridors, pastures, and remnant stands of Oregon white oak.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Columbia River Gorge National Wildlife Refuges Steigerwald Lake NWR Franz Lake NWR Pierce NWR Soaring high above the volcanic ridges of the Cascades, a family of winged migrants spot a familiar resting place below. Soon the weary travelers will find refuge near the shores of the Columbia River, that constant force responsible for carving this impressive passage. Though human progress may ring in the distance, they are at home among the wild chorus that sings the story of these jewels of the Columbia River Gorge. Crown Point as seen from Steigerwald Lake NWR ©Dave Olson The Constancy of Change The forces of nature have brought great change to the Columbia River Gorge; at times slowly through the steady flow of the river, at other times in the form of cataclysmic events like the Ice Age Floods. People have also brought change to this area—altering the flow of water with dams and dikes, and clearing land for agriculture. This human influence created habitat loss, leading to the establishment of Steigerwald Lake, Franz Lake and Pierce National Wildlife Refuges. Located at the crossroads of the Cascade Mountains and the Columbia River, this area is uniquely significant to wildlife. Birds from the east side of the mountains mingle with those of the west in this near sea-level passage. When the second powerhouse was constructed at Bonneville Dam, lowland habitat was lost both up and downstream. A portion of these Refuge lands were established to mitigate for this loss—creating more feeding habitat for migrating and resident wildlife. WASHINGTON Once, natural processes of the river provided habitat by creating and replenishing wetlands and depositing sandbars colonized by willows and cottonwoods. Due to the demands of energy and agriculture these habitats vanished. Wetlands were drained, riparian forests were cleared, dikes were constructed, and dams were built. As a result, the river no longer performs its natural processes on the Refuges. The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service now protects these lands, often managing them with the same methods that depleted the original habitats to create a vibrant resource supporting a growing wildlife population. Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge is one of over 540 refuges in the National Wildlife Refuge System—a network of lands and waters set aside specifically for wildlife. Managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the System is a living heritage, conserving fish, wildlife and their habitats for future generations. Teeming with wildlife at the eastern edge of Camas and Washougal, Washington, the 1,049-acre Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge presents a fantastic opportunity to connect with nature through hiking and wildlife observation. Over 200 of the 300 bird species seen in Clark County have been observed on this relatively small refuge, making Steigerwald Lake an excellent birding destination. Bewick’s wren ©Roger Windemuth Habitat management is an active process at Steigerwald Lake. Refuge staff, with the support of volunteers, are actively restoring riparian plants along salmon-bearing Gibbons Creek. Other habitats of vital importance to the Refuge include seasonal wetlands, grasslands, and oak forested uplands. Osprey, nesting along the Columbia, come to the Refuge in search of a meal. ©Roger Windemuth Bufflehead overwinter on the Refuge ©Roger Windemuth The results of these management efforts can be measured in abundance. In addition to its diversity of birds, the Refuge is also home to over 20 species of mammals, 15 species of reptiles and amphibians, and a wide variety of insects, fish, and plants. With the opening of a new trail in 2009, the Refuge has also become a place where people can experience and learn about wildlife and the places they call home. Signs of Black-tailed deer can be seen along the trail Coyote search the grasslands for voles ©Roger Windemuth Enjoying the Refuge Steigerwald Lake NWR is a place where wildlife comes first. When visiting, always remember, you are a guest in their home. Refuge Hours The Refuge is open from dawn to dusk throughout the year. The closing time is posted on the entrance gate. Environmental Education Environmental education is an important part of ensuring the future of conservation. Educators who are interested in coming to the Refuge and connecting their students with nature are encouraged to call and learn about current opportunities. Gibbons Creek Wildlife Art Trail Along this 2.75-mile wildlife art trail you’ll encounter a variety of habitats and wildlife viewpoints. As you walk, look closer—natural and man-made art is waiting to be discovered. The trail is open year-round, with a seasonal spur closed from October 1 through April 30 to provide sanctuary for wintering waterfowl. The rest of Steigerwald Lake NWR is closed to the public. Please stay on the trail. ©Dave Olson Look for dowitchers, heads
Refuge Map Evergr een Hig hway Columbia River Gorge Overlook Ca 0 Steigerwald Lake pta Steigerwald Lake Overlook in W illi am Cla S rk Pa rk 0 d on pP u ca Miles Kilometers 1/2 1/2 Steigerwald Lake Gib bon s C Lake reek Redtail Redtail Lake Overlook Columbia River Overlook Fish Ladder Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge Columbia River Refuge Boundary Gibbons Creek Art Trail Open Year-Round Reed Island Seasonal Spur Closed Oct 1-April 30 to protect wildlife Pierce Franz Lake Columbia River Dike Trail NWR Bikes, horseback riding, jogging, and dogs on leash allowed. NWR Steigerwald Lake NWR Trailhead Willard Willard NFH Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area Vancouver Washougal Camas Franz Lake NWR Steigerwald Lake NWR Portland Troutdale Beacon Rock State Park Bonneville Dam Multnomah Falls Crown Point State Park Hood River Cascade Locks Bridge of the Gods Parking Spring White Creek NFH Salmon NFH Little White Salmon NFH Stevenson Pierce NWR Restrooms
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge Watchable Wildlife In order to see birds it is necessary to become part of the silence. - Robert Lynd Introduction Steigerwald Lake NWR A wide variety of birds await the patient observer at Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge. Located in the Columbia River Gorge, at the crossroads of the Cascade Mountain Range and the Columbia River, birds from the east can be found among those of the west at this near sea-level passage. Bird List Key c Seasonal Abundance Codes Over 200 of the 300 bird species seen in Clark County, Washington have been observed on this relatively small refuge, making Steigerwald Lake an excellent birding destination. A number of habitats support this diverse bird population, including riparian forest along Gibbons Creek, seasonal wetlands, grasslands and oak forested uplands. Enjoying Wildlife When looking at a bird, pay close attention to characteristics like color, size, shape, wing and head markings. Always observe first and then refer to your identification book, because the bird may move out of sight quickly. This is especially true of perching birds. Also, be sure to listen for their calls and sounds. Take note of the type of habitat in which you see the bird, and where in the habitat they are likely to be found—canopy, tree trunk, brushy areas, open water or on the ground. u - Uncommon – usually present but may not be seen or heard o - Occasional – seen or heard only a few times per season r - Rare – unlikely to be seen or heard a - Accidental - less than five records Sp - Spring – March through May S - Summer – June through July F - Fall – August through November The Gibbons Creek Wildlife Art Trail offers Refuge visitors the chance to experience and learn about wildlife and the places they call home. As a guest in their home, your visit will be most successful if you move slowly, talk softly, use binoculars and leave only footprints behind. The trail is open year-round from dawn until dusk. A seasonal spur is closed from October 1 – April 30 to provide sanctuary for wintering waterfowl. Observation Tips Seasons - Common – likely to be seen or heard W - Winter – December through February Marsh wren Birds of Steigerwald Lake NWR Common Name Loons Common Loon Grebes Pied-billed Grebe Horned Grebe Red-necked Grebe Eared Grebe Western Grebe Cormorants Double-crested Cormorant Bitterns, Herons and Egrets American Bittern Great Blue Heron Great Egret Cattle Egret Green Heron Black-crowned Night-Heron Sp S r c o W u c o c o u o a a o o u r u u u c r u c o r u r o r u c u a r a Ibises and Spoonbills White-faced Ibis a a New World Vultures Turkey Vulture c c Swans, Geese and Ducks Greater White-fronted Goose Snow Goose Ross’s Goose Brant Cackling Goose Canada Goose Mute Swan Trumpeter Swan Tundra Swan Wood Duck Gadwall Eurasian Wigeon American Wigeon Mallard Blue-winged Teal Cinnamon Teal F o o c u r a r r u c o r u c r c c c c u a r r c r c u o r a c c o r c c r c c u c u o c u o c u c Common Name Sp S F W Northern Shoveler Northern Pintail Green-winged Teal Canvasback Redhead Ring-necked Duck Tufted Duck Greater Scaup Lesser Scaup Surf Scoter Long-tailed Duck Bufflehead Common Goldeneye Barrow’s Goldeneye Hooded Merganser Common Merganser Red-breasted Merganser Ruddy Duck u o c r o c o r r r u o u r o o c c c o a c a u c Osprey, Kites, Hawks and Eagles Osprey White-tailed Kite Bald Eagle Northern Harrier Sharp-shinned Hawk Cooper’s Hawk Red-shouldered Hawk Swainson’s Hawk Red-tailed Hawk Ferruginous Hawk Rough-legged Hawk Golden Eagle Red-tailed hawk © Ken Morris o c c r r u o o r o u a a o r a o r r r r c c u c o a u c r a u c o r o a c a o c c a r c o a u o a r a c u r o c o a Common Name Falcons and Caracaras American Kestrel Merlin Gyrfalcon Peregrine Falcon Prairie Falcon Sp S o o r F W u u u a a o a o Gallinaceous Birds Ring-necked Pheasant California Quail r r r r r r r r Rails Virginia Rail Sora American Coot o o c o u u u r u r Cranes Sandhill Crane a Plovers Semipalmated Plover Killdeer u Stilts and Avocets Black-necked Stilt American Avocet a a Sandpipers and Phalaropes Greater Yellowlegs Lesser Yellowlegs u o Greater yellowlegs u r u u u u c o o Common Name Solitary Sandpiper Spotted Sandpiper Long-billed Curlew Sanderling Semipalmated Sandpiper Western Sandpiper Least Sandpiper Baird’s Sandpiper Pectoral Sandpiper Dunlin Short-billed Dowitcher Long-billed Dowitcher Wilson’s Snipe Wilson’s Phalarope Red-necked Phalarope Red Phalarope Skuas, Jaegers, Gulls and Terns Bonaparte’s Gull Mew Gull Ring-billed Gull California Gull Herring Gull Thayer’s Gull Glaucous-winged Gull Glaucous Gull Caspian Tern Sp S r r a u o o a u c r F a u r o r r r r r r o o u o r a u u r a a r r r o u u o r c u r o u o o r o o o o Pigeons and Doves Rock Pigeon Band-tailed Pigeon E

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