Willapa

National Wildlife Refuge - Washington

Willapa National Wildlife Refuge is located on the shores of Willapa Bay in Washington. It comprises of sand dunes, sand beaches, mudflats, grasslands, saltwater and freshwater marshes, and coniferous forest. The refuge includes Long Island with stands of old growth Western red cedar and hemlock. The refuge preserves many of unique ecosystems including salt marshes, muddy tideflats, rain drenched old growth forests, and coastal dunes and beaches. Freshwater marshes and grasslands are found along the southern shore of Willapa Bay.

maps

Map of Washington State Highways / Tourist Map. Published by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT).Washington State - Highway Map

Map of Washington State Highways / Tourist Map. Published by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT).

brochures

Brochure of Willapa National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Willapa - Brochure

Brochure of Willapa National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Visitor Map of Willapa National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Willapa - Map

Visitor Map of Willapa National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Trail Maps of Long Island and East Hills Units of Willapa National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Willapa - Long Island and East Hills Units Map

Trail Maps of Long Island and East Hills Units of Willapa National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Shorebirds at Willapa National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Willapa - Shorebirds

Shorebirds at Willapa National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Willapa NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/willapa/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willapa_National_Wildlife_Refuge Willapa National Wildlife Refuge is located on the shores of Willapa Bay in Washington. It comprises of sand dunes, sand beaches, mudflats, grasslands, saltwater and freshwater marshes, and coniferous forest. The refuge includes Long Island with stands of old growth Western red cedar and hemlock. The refuge preserves many of unique ecosystems including salt marshes, muddy tideflats, rain drenched old growth forests, and coastal dunes and beaches. Freshwater marshes and grasslands are found along the southern shore of Willapa Bay.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Willapa National Wildlife Refuge Plants and animals from land, rivers, and ocean are all present at Willapa National Wildlife Refuge - and all are dependent on the delicate balance of the estuary. In this coastal environment, the incoming tides combine life-giving nourishment of the ocean with the nutrient-laden fresh waters of rivers and streams to create one of the most productive environments on the Pacific Coast. Willapa National Wildlife Refuge is located on Willapa Bay, one of the most pristine estuaries in the United States. Willapa Bay is the second largest estuary on the Pacific coast and includes over 260 square miles of water surface. The “Blue Goose” has become the symbol of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Willapa NWR was established in 1937 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to protect migrating and wintering populations of brant, waterfowl, shorebirds, and other migratory birds and their habitats. The Refuge was established at a time when many estuaries were rapidly being destroyed from the effects of diking, draining, dredging, sedimentation, and pollution. USFWS USFWS Preserving a Rich Natural Heritage The Refuge preserves a number of unique ecosystems including diverse salt marshes, muddy tideflats, rain‑ drenched old growth forests, and dynamic coastal dunes and beaches. Freshwater marshes and grasslands are found along the southern shore of the bay. Many different salmon species are found in the waters of Willapa Bay, including chum, chinook and coho. Visitors to Willapa NWR can enjoy viewing a wide variety of wildlife, from Roosevelt elk on Long Island, to tens of thousands of shorebirds crowding the beaches of Leadbetter Point. Willapa National Wildlife Refuge is one of over 560 refuges in the National Wildlife Refuge System, a nationwide network of lands managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service specifically for wildlife. The System is a living heritage, conserving wildlife and habitat for people today and for generations to come. Chum salmon © Shari Erickson Hawks Point 105 Toke Point 101 Range Point Raymond Bruceport Park Snag Islands Leadbetter Point Unit Bay Center Boat Ramp Y BA Grassy Island WDFW Boat Ramp PA WILLA Leadbetter Point State Park PACIF IC OCEAN 6 South Bend Oysterville miles 0 4 kilometers 0 4 Willapa NWR provides an excellent opportunity for people to experience wildlife in a dynamic natural setting. The Refuge consists of approximately 17,000 acres and is divided into several management units: Leadbetter Point Unit at the northern tip of Long Beach Peninsula; Long Island Unit in the middle part of the bay; East Hills Unit, consisting of Teal Slough, Headquarters, Greenhead Slough, and Bear River along the southeastern shore of Willapa Bay; and the South Bay Unit, consisting of Riekkola, Tarlatt, Porter’s Point and Lewis at the south end of the bay. Willapa Nahcotta Ocean Park 101 Klipsan Beach National Wildlife Refuge N Long Island Unit 103 Parking Area Hunting Area Restrooms Archery Hunting Area Boat Launch Campground Refuge Headquarters Lewis Long Beach Naselle Greenhead Slough Closed Area East Hills Unit H 4 101 Bear River U.S. 101 Alt Route Seaview Ilwaco 401 Cape Disappointment State Park Chinook 101 N GTO SHIN WA ON G E OR Hiking Trail Porter Point Tarlatt Riekkola Fort Columbia State Park Co lu m bi Riv er e ridg ria B Asto a N GTO SHIN WA GON ORE 30 Astoria Proclamation Boundary Hunting of migratory birds within the proclamation boundary is prohibited Refuge Headquarters Wildlife Viewing Area Teal Slough South Bay Unit Observation Blind Refuge Boundary Willapa Bay has been shaped by many forces of nature including wind, glaciers, earthquakes, floods, and tsunamis. The Long Beach Peninsula is a natural barrier, protecting the bay and its wildlife from storm winds and waves. Shorebirds © Courtesy of Dr. Madeline Kalbach An average of 110 inches of precipitation falls each year in the area, swelling streams that carry nutrient‑rich water and sediment into the bay. Chum, chinook, and coho salmon spawn in streams on the Refuge. The bay’s shallow water and mudflats support vast beds of eelgrass and shellfish. Eelgrass provides critical spawning habitat for fish and is the staple food of brant, a sea goose that migrates along the Pacific Coast between Alaskan nesting grounds and more southerly wintering grounds. Roosevelt elk graze in open fields year-round and use wooded areas for cover and shelter. USFWS The Nature of Water During the peak spring migration, the number of shorebirds present at Willapa Bay exceeds 100,000, making it one of the most important sites for shorebirds on the west coast of North America! Isolated sandbars near the mouth of the bay provide pupping grounds for harbor seals and rest sites for migratory birds. Seabirds, such as sooty shearwaters and brown pelicans, stream into the mouth of the bay from the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Willapa National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Services 2017 Pacific County, Washington Leadbetter Point Unit Proclamation Boundary (Closed to migratory bird hunting) Joe Johns Rd Refuge Boundary ! @ Ö ! y ! Bay Ave 101 £ ¤ Lewis 9 2 campsites ! 9 ! !! i _ 22 7 t h P l Copyright:© 2014 Esri Sand Spit 3 campsites 9 ! Sawlog 6 campsites Smoky Hollow 4 campsites! 9 103 d Sandridge Roa y ! Riekkola h 67 t Lewis i ! Bathroom Trails Refuge lands, tidelands, and water closed to all hunting. Clamming Refuge Closure Areas Closed to Public ! Greenhead Slough i Bear River 101 Closed to Public March 15September 30 Miles 0 0.5 1 World Shaded Relief 2 Hunting is permitted during authorized state seasons and only in designated areas of the refuge. For more information Kilometers please visit www.fws.gov/refuge/willapa Copyright:© 2014 Esri or call 360-484-3482. £ ¤ 0 é è 1 2 Fishing is permitted from the shores of Willapa Bay. Fishing is not allowed on refuge streams or interior sloughs. South Bay Unit Sandridge Road Parking Regulated goose hunt area. Refuge permit and fee required. East Hills Unit Pl Hunter Registration Kiosk _ ! Observation Blind Waterfowl hunting. Porter Point © !! ©© \Tarlatt! ! © © ! ! © ! © ! 85th Street ! ©! © Hunting Blind Deer and elk hunting. All state regulations apply. Refuge Headquarters Headquarters i ! Campground (Refuge permit required early archery elk hunt) Deer and elk hunting. *Firearm restriction* @! ! _! i! Ö 95th Street Boat Launch Archery Hunting for elk, deer, black bear, and grouse (ruffed and sooty) only. Refuge permit required. Teal Slough 9 ! Interpretive Sign Hunting Status i ! S o u t h B ay U n i t Long Beach North Potshot Potshot Pinnacle Rock 5 campsites Cranberry Road Pioneer Road ! \ i ! _ ! Long Island Unit 9 ! V U © ! Stanley Point Refuge Office **A pre-purchased WA State Discovery pass is required for parking at Leadbetter Point.** 101 Porter Point ( / 95th Street © ! ! © © ! Riekkola © ! © ! !Tarlatt \ 0 Miles 0.5 1 © ! 67th Place Map Date: 12June2017; File: WLP_hunt_map_2017 © ! ©! ! © Hunter Registration Kiosk i! ! _ Greenhead Slough i ! Bear River 85th Street Lewis Raymond South Bend Copyright:© 2014 Esri Pacific Ocean Pioneer Road i ! £ ¤ 101 Willapa Bay Æ6 · WASHINGTON . Willapa NWR Naselle ·4 Esri Æ Copyright:© 2014
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Willapa National Wildlife Refuge Long Island and East Hills Units Public Use Map Pacific County, Washington 124°0'0"W 123°55'0"W 46°30'0"N 46°30'0"N Lewis Campground < ! Sawlog Campground Sand Spit Campground < ! < ! Smokey Hollow Campground < ! Don Bonker Cedar Grove Trail Teal Slough Trail Willapa National Wildlife Refuge Office and Boat Launch 46°25'0"N Pinnacle Rock Campground < ! £ ¤ 101 Salmon Art and Cutthroat Climb Trail 124°0'0"W 123°55'0"W Produced by the Biological Resources Program Willapa NWRC - Ilwaco, Washington Land Status Current to 08/2011 Map Date: 08/14/2013 Base Image: USGS 1:24,000 DRG File: WLP_Long_Is_public_use_map_2013 0 0 46°25'0"N @ ! 0.5 0.5 1 1 Kilometers 2 Miles 2 1 in = 1 mile @ ! Refuge Headquarters < ! Campground Open to Public Shellfishing Willapa NWR Trails Proclaimation Bndy. Refuge Boundary UTM Zone 10 NAD 83
SHOREBIRDS WILLAPA AND THE LONGBEACH PENINSULA Shorebirds Unite us and Connect us What can we do to protect shorebirds? • When driving avoid foraging shorebirds • Leash dogs until you clear shorebird groups • Discourage dogs from chasing shorebirds • Avoid flying kites near nesting birds • Drive a little slower and keep lookout for shorebirds and plover chicks • Walk around birds resting in high dunes • Remove trash to reduce predation • Raise visitor awareness More information? • https://funbeach.com/beach-driving • https://www.whsrn.org/ • https://www.fws.gov/refuge/willapa/ wildlife_and_habitat/shorebirds.html • http://data.prbo.org/apps/pfss/ • http://www.conservewildlifenj.org/pr otecting/projects/shorebird/ Contact for anything on this brochure is vanessa_loverti@FWS.gov 503-505-4772 A local effort providing tips for protecting shorebirds and shorebird habitat SMALL SHOREBIRDS [5-8 in] MEDIUM SHOREBIRDS [8-12in] Photo Credit: USFWS SANDERLING Most common on beach Photo Credit: Dan Roby Photo Credit: Audubon WESTERN SANDPIPER Small downward turned bill Photo Credit: Audubon Large bird long downward bill Photo Credit; Thomas Rowley SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER Photo Credit; Thomas Rowley DUNLIN LARGE SHOREBIRDS [14-23in] RED KNOT Photo Credit; Thomas Rowley BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER LONG-BILLED CURLEW Photo Credit: Andreas Trepte WHIMBRIL Smaller downward curved bill Photo: Alchetron – all about birds MARBLED GODWIT Long Slightly upturned bill

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