Historic Governors' Mansion

State Historic Site - Wyoming

The Historic Governors' Mansion State Historic Site is located at 300 E. 21st Street in Cheyenne. Rooms have been decorated to represent the 1905, 1937, 1955 and 1960s eras. The Historic Mansion is also a contributing building in the Rainsford Historic District.

maps

Map of Seasonal and Year-Round BLM Public Land User Limitations in the BLM Rawlins Field Office area in Wyoming. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Wyoming Public Land - Rawlins

Map of Seasonal and Year-Round BLM Public Land User Limitations in the BLM Rawlins Field Office area in Wyoming. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Park brochure of Historic Governors' Mansion State Historic Site (SHS) in Wyoming. Published by the Wyoming Department of State Parks and Cultural Resources.Historic Governors' Mansion - Brochure

Park brochure of Historic Governors' Mansion State Historic Site (SHS) in Wyoming. Published by the Wyoming Department of State Parks and Cultural Resources.

Walking Tour of the Historic Governors' Mansion Neighborhood. Published by the Wyoming Department of State Parks and Cultural Resources.Historic Governors' Mansion - Walking Tour

Walking Tour of the Historic Governors' Mansion Neighborhood. Published by the Wyoming Department of State Parks and Cultural Resources.

Historic Governors' Mansion SHS https://wyoparks.wyo.gov/index.php/places-to-go/historic-governors-mansion https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wyoming_Governor%27s_Mansion The Historic Governors' Mansion State Historic Site is located at 300 E. 21st Street in Cheyenne. Rooms have been decorated to represent the 1905, 1937, 1955 and 1960s eras. The Historic Mansion is also a contributing building in the Rainsford Historic District.
WYOPARKS.STATE.WY.US WYOPARKS.STATE.WY.US WYOPARKS.ORG THINGS TO DO AND SEE FEES FREE ADMISSION, Donations Accepted Self-Guided Tours Kids’ Activities Group Tour Available Upon Request 307-777-7878 Wyoming takes pride in the first residence provided for governors and their families. The home has been the setting for state dinners, first-family christenings, wedding receptions and birthday parties. PLEASE REMEMBER Please do not touch! Help us preserve our artifacts for future generations by not sitting on furniture or touching items as you tour the home. The mansion is full of many beautiful things. Most are very delicate and easily damaged by the oils and dust on your hands. By not handling the woodwork, wallcoverings and furnishings, you are helping us preserve these items for the future. Thank you! The Historic Governors’ Mansion interprets the history of the Mansion, the First Families of Wyoming and Mansion staff from 19051976. Visitors can embark upon self- guided tours of the home and see both the public and private areas of the First Executive Mansion built in Wyoming. Enjoy audio tours, children’s activities and interactive kiosks to guide you through the day-to-day life of the Mansion and its inhabitants. CALENDAR OF EVENTS A full calendar of events includes the Annual Egg Hunt and the popular Tinsel Through Time Holiday exhibit and activities. HISTORY Historic Governors’ Mansion State Historic Site is administered by the Division of State Parks, Historic Sites and Trails; Wyoming Department of State Parks and Cultural Resources. 6/18 Fourteen years after achieving statehood in 1890, the State of Wyoming built its first governor’s mansion in 1904. The mansion was intended to be a home of the people, and was never enclosed by a fence or had on-site security. From 1905 to 1976, the mansion was the residence of 19 Wyoming first families. Governor Bryant B. Brooks and his large family were the first occupants. The mansion was also home to the first female governor in the United States, Nellie Tayloe Ross. Mrs. Ross was elected to fulfill the remainder of her husband’s, Governor William B. Ross, term. The last family to occupy the mansion was also Wyoming’s first three-term governor, Ed Herschler, and his wife, Casey. The Mansion continues its second century as a valuable symbol of the state and its history. LOCATION AND HOURS The Historic Governors’ Mansion is located at 300 E. 21st Street in Cheyenne, Wyoming, a block and a half from the Wyoming State Museum and five blocks from the State Capitol Building. Summer Hours (June 1 – Sept. 30) Monday - Saturday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday: 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Winter Hours (Oct. 1 - May 31) Wednesday - Saturday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays by appointment ALL HOURS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE PLEASE CALL FOR SEASONAL CLOSURE DATES: OCT/NOV/JAN. SPECIAL EVENTS The Carriage House at the Mansion can be reserved for special events year round. This historic space is perfect for small meetings, bridal and baby showers and outdoor weddings in the summer. For reservations, call the Mansion at 307-777-7878. SELF-GUIDED TOUR First Floor embroidery. The table lamps have lambskin shades. Kitchen: (Restored to 1937) The kitchen and pantry FirstPorch Floor First Floor Ramp FIRST FLOOR Entrance Hall: Staff Dining/ Porch Sitting Room Kitchen Staff Dining/ Sitting Room Breakfast Room Ramp (Restored to Kitchen 1905) The Breakfast ceramic tile floor Room Governors’ Dining Den Room is original to the home. The three Governors’ Dining Den Room combination, brass ceiling Drawing fixtures are Room Entrance Library similar to Hall Drawing the originals Room Entrance installed during Library Hall construction. Portico The gas arm was lit as a back-up Portico system to provide light. During the past 100 years, numerous dignitaries and well-known public figures, including President Harry Truman, Vice President Richard Nixon, John D. Rockefeller and writer James Michener, were greeted and welcomed to the State of Wyoming in the entrance hall of the mansion. Library: (Restored to 1905) A Library by Wyoming authors was established at the Mansion in 1967 by First Lady Bobbi Hathaway. The collection was moved to the new Governor’s Residence in 1976. Drawing Room: (Restored to 1937) Governor John B. Kendrick in 1915 replaced the original fireplace with this beautiful oak paneled mantle and chimneypiece. Dining Room: (Restored to 1937) The set, purchased in 1937 at the Chicago Furniture Mart, includes a sideboard, chest of drawers, and a cabinet-on-stand. The leather upholstery on the chairs is original. During World War II, Governor and Mrs. Hunt would often invite homesick soldiers stationed at F.E. Warren Air Force to dinner. Governors’ Den: (Restored to the 1950s) This room was last redecorated during Milward Simpson’s term of office. Simpson wanted a room in the mansion to reflect Wyoming’s western heritage. Well-known Wyoming furniture maker, Tom Molesworth, made the furnitu
2121—2103 EVANS AVENUE 10 *To enjoy all of the Keefe Cottages, walk along this side of Evans Avenue north toward 22nd Street. Designed by J.P. Julien and built by M.P. Keefe, all of these homes were built between 1890 and 1894. J.P. Julien arrived in Cheyenne in 1867 and was the first architect in town. He designed the First Methodist Church in downtown Cheyenne. His most notable design was the gallows first used in the Tom Horn hanging and in hangings at the Rawlins Penitentiary. They were designed so that "no person or 'hangman' might feel responsible for the death of a fellow man." An Irish immigrant, M.P. Keefe arrived in Cheyenne in 1876 and began to influence the community through politics and leave his mark through buildings. He built the Knights of Pythias building, St. Mary's Catholic Church, the Idelman Mansion (now Schrader's Funeral home) and the Majestic Building. He also served as mayor for the city from 1903-1904. Local legend states that he built these homes for his seven daughters and most likely used brick from his own factory here in Cheyenne. *Walk back south to the corner of 21st Street and head towards the Mansion Cheyenne Daily Leader, July 1, 1890, Page 6 WYOMING STATE PARKS, HISTORIC SITES & TRAILS Around the Block Walking Tour of the Historic Governors’ Mansion 10 4 9 1 Neighborhood Now that you’ve explored the inside of the Historic Governors’ Mansion, let’s walk through the neighborhood and see what it looked like 100 years ago and learn about the people who lived here. 2 3 7 5 11 8 6 NO 11 301 EAST 21st STREET *Stop in front of the Historic Governors’ Mansion and turn south to look across the street In 1904 there were three houses across the street from the Mansion. All of them were bought by Irene Eaton in 1938 and torn down and replaced by this apartment complex. Ms. Eaton then sold the building in early 1940. Historic Governors’ Mansion State Historic Site is administered by the Division of State Parks, Historic Sties & Trails, Wyoming Department of State Parks and Cultural Resources. http://wyoparks.state.wy.us PLEASE BE RESPECTFUL AND CAREFUL Follow the squirrel tracks on your map and directions inside to each site. Match the number on the map to the same number next to its description. While exploring the neighborhood, please remain on the sidewalk and do not walk on other people’s property. Please do not take photos of these houses - people still live in them! Some of the sidewalks are uneven and cracked due to large tree roots growing, so please be careful. Most importantly—HAVE FUN! H RT HISTORY OF NEIGHBORHOOD 1 AND MANSION When the Historic Governors’ Mansion was built in 1904, several houses in this neighborhood were already here. This location was chosen because Wyoming citizens wanted the governor to be easily accessible to the people he represented. Many houses in this neighborhood have been preserved and brought back to their original appearance. Thanks to the efforts of concerned and active citizens, the houses around the Mansion have been saved for you to see today and for future generations to enjoy and explore. The Historic Governors’ Mansion sits in the Historic Rainsford District, named after George Rainsford. Mr. Rainsford was an architect who came to Cheyenne from New York to try horse ranching. He also designed homes for his friends, some of which are in this neighborhood. The houses in this neighborhood all share tree-lined streets, shaded sidewalks, and large front yards. 2115—2121 HOUSE AVENUE 2 These homes may have been moved from nearby Fort D.A. Russell (now F.E. Warren Air Force Base) to this location between 1890 and 1894. Andrew E. Roedel bought the properties in 1899 and they remained in the family as rental units until the late 1970s. A pharmacist by trade, Mr. Roedel and his family also started the Roedel Drug Store, which operated from 1899 to 2007. The Mansion has always had these houses as neighbors. *From this location, continue to the corner of House Ave and 22nd Street; stop and look both ways to cross House Avenue to the west c. 1960 — Courtesy of Wyoming State Archives, Department of State Parks and Cultural Resources 3 URBAN NATURE As you walk along this block enjoy the urban nature around you. Listen for the crows and pigeons; watch for the squirrels. Listen for the church bells and the train whistle, too! Yards or gardens in 1905 would have been similar to what you see today, though probably not as developed. As people moved here from the east, women brought seeds from their gardens with them to plant here. The stronger ones survived and blended with the natural flowers of the plains. The Cottonwood tree is Wyoming’s State Tree and is very abundant around town. The Plains Cottonwood can grow between 60 and 100 feet tall with a five or six foot diameter trunk and can live up to 100 years! Cottonwoods like a lot of water and are found mostly near rivers and streams, but if these trees are started in dry soil, they

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